Suchergebnisse für cornils

Hello! This is Ross Sutherland. I’m going to talk about my poem Infinite Lives. I thought I’d tell you the story of how and why I wrote it.

The poem was written in 2012 (published in my collection ‘Emergency Window’). It was inspired by this sentence:

“A poem tries to escape it’s own subject matter”

I don’t know who said it originally. I heard it from the poet Billy Collins.  We start off on line one of the poem, in one place. Then, by the end of the poem, we’ve moved somewhere else entirely. When the poet sat down and wrote that first line, they had no idea where they were going to end up! I like this description of poetry. It really speaks to the me personally and helps explain the reason that I write. I want the poem to surprise me- to move me somewhere I wasn’t expecting. Writing a poem is a voyage of discovery (I know that sounds cheesy). You just go on your nerve.

I often find myself standing in front of classrooms yelling, “Poets are fakers! They want to pretend that they have all the answers, but they don’t! They’re making it up as they go along!”

I wanted to give an exercise to my students to explain this process. Here’s what I said to them:

“Find a memory. Go deep into your past and find something. It can be anything. Write down all you can remember. Keep describing that memory, until you find an object *inside* that memory that makes you think of *another* memory. As soon as you think of that object, transport yourself through time to that new memory – now repeat the process! Repeat again and again, creating a chain of memories that has you jumping back and forth through your lifespan.”

Through this process, time becomes fluid- we’re jumping through time based on the tiniest things: the smell of petrol, the sound of a klaxon, a dog bite, etc, etc.

I tried out this exercise myself. Here’s my notes:

 

I remember the first time I watched Star Wars. (1980) It was on TV. I was at a friend’s house. It was Easter. I remember eating a Yorkie egg and the burning remains of the Death Star. Those two images are connected in my head- easter eggs and a burning spaceship!

Which reminds me of playing space invaders. (1983) I loved the video arcade so much that I would play it in my head, even when there was no one else around. I remember hallucinating Space Invaders on the wall of my grandma’s lounge. On holiday (usually a campsite in France), I would spend all my money on the arcades, then go back to the tent to play dominos with my family.

Which reminds me of the rough edge of the dominos. Another strong memory from childhood. I associate that texture so powerfully with my family. We never felt more of a single unit than when we were playing dominos. 

Which reminds me of the dashboard of the family car: same texture as a domino. But this is a much later memory (1996). By this time, I am 15, working as a salesman for Dixons- an electrical retailers. My job involved selling kettles and toasters to old ladies. I used to rest my head against the dashboard when my Dad drove me to work on a Sunday morning. I used to have fantasies about the car crashing. I would try to steer the car off the road with my mind, similar to how I used to play space invaders in my head. This was the start of a difficult period of my life – I would find myself imagining my death almost constantly. It became an unhealthy obsession.

Which reminds me of an actual car crash I was in, two years later. (1998)No one was injured. But I’ve never been a good passenger ever since. I fell out the door of a car that was going about 25/30 miles an hour. My body hit the pavement and slid down the road until it hit a postbox…

Which reminds me of that bit in Westerns, when the bartender throws a beer along the edge of bar. You know? The beer slides perfectly along the whole length of the bar and into the waiting hand of the thirsty cowboy. I watched those films when I was little, and I thought the trick was was done with special effects. Years later, I watched a Western on DVD – one of the extras on the DVD was a compilation of glasses smashing – all the times that the barman messed up the trick. I finally understood how it worked – all the mistakes are hidden from the viewer. We just see the one perfect take. 

***

Having finished this exercise, I looked back over the material I’d collected. I’d started with a memory of Easter, age 4, and ended up in the DVD extras of a Western. In that sense, I’d fulfilled the brief. I’d been drawn by my subconscious- I’d escaped my own subject matter.

However, there was definitely a theme going through my journey. Almost every memory had focussed on “crashes” – most of these crashes were simulated crashes- playing videogames in my head, the deathstar exploding, fantasising about my car crashing, etc. I was surprised to discover this. It had not been my intention to talk about this. This was a present day anxiety finding its way into my work.

I think about death a lot. I’m one of those people that constantly asks themselves, “what if?” What if I stepped off this train platform / high ledge / etc. I don’t feel suicidal. I’m just running simulations. But this behaviour seems to be troubling me on a subconscious level. The poem was telling me this.

This is why the final part of the poem becomes so important. The “OK I finally get it” moment is a memory of me (as a child) realising how cinema is made! We hide the bad takes, we only show the good. And this is perhaps a lesson I can take into my own life. We all have negative thoughts. We all simulate bad things in our heads. And all these simulations are like out-takes from a film- we needed to work through them to get to the “good” take. We try try try again, until we get it right.

I suppose this poem was my way of saying to myself, “Ross, if you think you’re crazy. You’re not alone.”

…And it’s hardly an original idea. Quite boring really. But it was a necessary thing for me to write and go through.

Confession time- I think this poem was damaged a bit in the edit. I worked with my editor at Penned in the Margins, on editing the poem down to the final version. It was a much longer piece that we condensed down. Together, we blurred the edges of each memory, made the poem feel more dream-like. The idea was to recreate the way that humans connect memories in  their head- synapses move fast, the connections come and go quickly. However, I think that the poem loses some of it’s sense in the process.

I really agree with this comment from Kristoffer Cornils:

“I don’t like to consider those two concepts – »reality« and »virtuality« – as opposed entities, but rather as complementary to each other, if not completely indistinguishable.”

It pains me that this did not come through in the poem. Cornils hits upon the point that is just beyond the reach of the poem. It’s an idea that I was striving towards, but the poem ends too soon. Fantasy and memory intertwine- we cannot separate one from the other, and our worldview is built from their synthesis.

 I would like to comment on Stefan Mesch’s reading, but I can only read it though Google Translate, which is pretty hard! (If there is a version in English, please post it below and I’ll add some comments).

It’s clear Mesch didn’t like it but it’s hard to respond further. Reading Mesch’s criticism through GT is a bit like hearing your neighbours insulting you through the wall. You find yourself straining extra hard to hear it, but all you can gather is a feeling!

Ah, in that sense. It’s a bit like reading poetry.

Anyway, whether you liked it or hated it, I’m happy to respond in the comments below :)

Ross Sutherland Jean-Claude van Damme

sutherland jcvd

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 7, zu “Jean-Claude van Damme”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: seit zwei Stunden suche ich 80er- und 90er-Trash, in dem die Freiheitsstatue beschädigt oder umkämpft wird. Kristoffer Cornils vermutet, dass Ross Sutherland hier eine Szene aus Roland Emmerichs “Universal Soldier” zitiert… aber ich glaube, er hat sich vergoogelt (“van Damme” + “Statue of Liberty” = Text über dieses Mahnmal in Manhattan). ich selbst denke bei Ross Sutherlands Pastiche zuerst an die mörderschlechte, unbedingt sehenswerte Intro-Sequenz des “G.I. Joe”-Trickfilms von 1987. 

.

“Terminator” (eher 2 als 1), “Stirb Langsam” (eher 3 als 1; auf keinen Fall 2), “Escape from New York” waren wichtige Actionfilme für mich Mitte der 90er, zwischen 12 und 14. Jean-Claude van Damme aber sah ich nur in “Street Fighter” (ein Kreis schließt sich) und, aktueller, in einem viralen Video (auch hier: unbedingt öffnen!), in dem er mich halb anekelt, halb amüsiert. im Frühling las ich eine lange Reportage über die verpfuschten “Street Fighter”-Dreharbeiten in Thailand… und seitdem seitdem sehe ich van Damme weniger als den prototypischen (Eurotrash-)Helden der Direct-to-Video-Filme der 80er und 90er… sondern als den prototypischen, gut gelaunten, hedonistischen (Eurotrash-)Videotheken-Besucher. Schmierig, aber charmant:
.

“Years later, Jean-Claude Van Damme admitted he had a serious drug problem while filming Street Fighter: The Movie. He also confessed to having an extramarital affair with co-star Kylie Minogue.
.

From the actor’s August 2012 interview with The Guardian:
.

“Yes,” says Van Damme, “Okay. Yes, yes, yes. It happened. I was in Thailand, we had an affair. Sweet kiss, beautiful lovemaking. It would be abnormal not to have had an affair, she’s so beautiful and she was there in front of me every day with a beautiful smile, simpatico, so charming, she wasn’t acting like a big star. I knew Thailand very well, so I showed her my Thailand. She’s a great lady.”‘

.

zweite Idee: heute also kann ich Jean-Claude van Damme mit etwas gutem Willen als schrägen Vogel lesen, naiven Horndog, Loveable Jock. vor 20 Jahren aber, in der Unterstufe, standen solche Helden, Sportskanonen, Strahlemänner auf der Gegenseite: ein Schlumpf wie Schlaubi kriegt regelmäßig eins auf Maul, und in einem van-Damme-, Chuck-Norris-, Steven-Seagal- oder Bud-Spencer-Film hätte ich nur Opfer, Freak oder Widerling sein dürfen, Kinder wie ich werden Scar statt Simba, Jaffar statt Aladdin, Mel Gibson lässt in “Braveheart” einen Schwulen aus dem Fenster werfen… mit 12 versteht ein Kinderpublikum, welche Menschen in welcher Geschichte erwünscht / willkommen sind.

.

wer hätte ich sein dürfen… im Erzählraum eines van-Damme-Films? höchstens der steife, blasse, tuntig-oder-sonst-irgendwie-sexuell-vermurkste Bösewicht? oder sein hoffnungsloser Sohn?

.

dritte Idee: Ross Sutherlands Gedicht trifft bei mir einen Nerv. und funktioniert – auch über die bloße Grundidee hinaus – hervorragend: Atomsprengköpfe, eine Wand aus Fernsehschirmen, Honduras, Rom, Washington, Peru, geheime Bösewicht-Tattoos, böse Agenten mit bös verbrauchter Haut (“fahl”, wie Konstantin Ames übersetzt? oder eher teigig, gelbstichig? sind nicht die meisten solcher Handlanger nicht-weiß?), eine Privatinsel, prächtige Uniformen, viel zu rotes Blut… all diese Bilder und Motive sind so perfekt klischiert und abgegriffen, ich sehe den Film vor mir, in all seiner Pracht, gedreht zwischen 1987 und 93.

.

besonders schön: Tattoos auf der Arschbacke? van Damme, der die Wachleute völlig nackt auszieht? warum sind solche Filme oft offen homophob – und bauen dann solche Kracher ein?

.

vierte Idee: mir gefällt die Lesart, der Kunstgriff, Ross Sutherlands Idee, dass das Kind eines erfolglosen, vernichtend geschlagenen Bösewichts den Triumph Jean-Claude van Dammes auf Video sehen kann, egal, ob auf Überwachungs-Tapes aus dem geheimen Hauptquartier oder eben als tatsächlicher Hollywood-Trashfilm (weil der Vater nur einen Bösewicht spielt? weil der Vater ein realer Terrorist war, dessen Geschichte in einem Jean-Claude-van-Damme-Projekt nacherzählt wurde? weil ein profanes Kind seinen profanen Vater wieder erkennt – in der Sorte Verlierer und Terror-Strippenzieher, die Video-Helden wie Jean-Claude van Damme jedes Mal besiegen?) egal: Ross Sutherlands Gedicht funktioniert auf all diesen Ebenen. mehr noch: es funktioniert besonders gut, weil es all diese Ebenen, Lesarten zulässt.

.

fünfte Idee: Fernsehen vs. das reale Leben. sich selbst auf Video sehen, sich selbst in Video-Figuren spiegeln, die eigene Geschichte in Popkultur erzählt bekommen, platte Helden, platte Feinde, platte Hollywood-Triumphe als Selbstbestätigung Amerikas, die Frage, ob der Bildschirm “die Wahrheit” zeigt und die grelle, künstliche Inszenierung “mehr Wahrheit” festhalten kann als das graue, tägliche Leben… das alles sind recht langweilig bekannte Gemeinschaftskunde- und Medienpädagogik-Fragen, und ich bin unsicher, ob Ross Sutherland viel Kluges, Neues beizutragen hat. trotzdem – auch, wenn die Fragen bekannt und die Klischeebilder abgegriffen sind: “Jean-Claude van Damme” hat mich von allen sieben hier veröffentlichten Arbeiten Ross Sutherlands am meisten überzeugt. gefällt mir!

.

gern gelesen: unbedingt, ja! ich wünschte, ich würde Jean-Claude van Damme besser kennen und könnte beurteilen, ob der Text zu ihm passt… oder ob das selbe Gedicht auch “Dolph Lundgren” hätte heißen können.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “There are reports of a life-sign inside the perimeter.” das “there are” wirkt clunky, unbeholfen. wer übermittelt dem Vater diese Nachricht?

.

später / danach:

.

“Runaways” erzählt von sechs Jugendlichen aus dem Marvel-Universum, die verstehen, dass ihre Eltern Superschurken sind. ich las letzten Herbst die ersten sechs von 52 Ausgaben… aber war nicht besonders überzeugt / interessiert.

.

ein Übersetzungs-Tadel: ich glaube, “Dad puts a bullet through his general’s eye” soll heißen: “Papa verpasst / schießt seinem General eine Kugel zwischen die Augen”, nicht “Papa schiebt eine Kugel durch sein Generalsauge.”

.

Musik-Assoziationen? ich denke an Bon Jovis platt-sympathische 90er-Jahre-Medienkritik “Real Life”: ein Song, der ähnliche Fragen stellt.

.

und: fast eine Woche lang dachte ich, die letzte Ziele wäre “it’s not OK to lose”. hätte mir besser gefallen – und den Erzähler interessanter gemacht.

.

weiter mit: meinem Abschluss-Statement, auf Englisch. erscheint am Dienstag, 23. September.

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

ross sutherland experiment

ross sutherland experiment 2

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 6, zu “Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: das ist zu lang. und als Video schöner / sympathischer:

.

Ross Sutherland: Experiment to determine the Existence of Love (Youtube)

.

zweite Idee: ich lese dieses Gedicht als schnelle, eitle, spielerische und bewusst ausschweifende Gedanken- und Ideenburg, ehrgeizig, bunt, kleinteilig… aber beliebig und nicht sehr stabil. so (Link).

.

dritte Idee: alle Worte der deutschen Übersetzung alphabetisch sortiert, mit diesem Programm:

.

*rogueelements* 1 2 22 3 4 5 6 ab Alkohol Alle Alle alle als an an an Angst-Pufferzone anhaltend Ankreuzkästchenstimuli Ansagen Anstalten Anwendung Anwesenden Apparat Attrappe auf auf auf Aufriss auftauchen Auge ausgelöst ausgemusterte Ausrichtung Aussprache Auto Bad bedenklicher bedeutender Bein berühren bilden bin birgt Blickwinkel bloß blutet blutrote Brille Bräunungsstreifen Busfahrschein Bürgersteige Charlie da Dann Das das das das das das Das dass dass Daten Daten davon dazu deinem dem dem den den Der der der der der der Der der der der der der Der Der des Diagnose dicke die Die die die die die die Die die die die die die Die die Die die dieses Diskussion diskutieren Doppelstöckige drollige durch durch durchgeknallter eben ehe eher ein ein Ein ein Ein ein Ein ein eine einen einer einer eines einfach eingerechnet einzelnen Element Endstadium entworfen Entwurf er er Ergebnisse Ergebnisse Ernährung erröten erscheinen erst erste erwarteten erwiesen Es evident Existenz Experiment Experiment Experiment falls falsche fangen Fehleinschätzung fest Flussdiagramme flüchtige folgen fortgeschrittene funktioniert Funktionsvorgänge für für fürs Ganze geborstene gebracht gegen gehängt Geister gelöscht gemacht gerade gerichtet gescheitertes Geschwisterargwohn Glasauge glatthäutiges gleicht gleichwertig hebt hervor Herz Herzfraktal hier hinter Humber Hypothese hätte höchstwahrscheinlich ich Ich ich ihr ihrem im in in In indes Infolgedessen ins ins ist ist ist Jalapeno Jazz jedem jeder jeder jenseits John JPEGs kann Kein kein kein keine Kellners Kerzenwachs klinische Knöchel kommen Kommentar Kontrolldaten Kontrolle kratzende Kühlschränke L Laborergebnissen Lakshmi Laryngophone Leib lese letzten Leute Liebe Liebe Liebe Linie Luftfeuchte Mann meine Meinung Merke messgeschieberten Methode mindestens Minuten Minuten mit mit mit mit mit Mitternacht Mond Mundwasser Muss Nachbartisch Nacht Nachweis Nehmen neu Neugier nicht nicht Null Nur offensichtliche Organe paar Parabelkurve Parker Pfeile Poster prescht qua Reaktionsfähigkeit reitet Salm Salons Schaubild scheitert schlage schlechter Schlussfolgerung schneller Schnitt schnitten schob schreiben Schummrige schwarzes Schwein Schwein Seele sein selbst Selbstmordgedanken Serotoninreserven sich sich Sicherheitsvorkehrungen Sicht sie sie sind sind sind singt Skala so so Sodann Sodann sollen sollte Spaghetticode Spiegel Spiel Spiel Spirale stapeln Statistenrolle steigt Stifte subatomaren suche Säugling Süße Tag Tag Tausenden Testphase Theorie tief Tippex Toilettenschmierereien treffliche treiben tu Uhr Um und und Und und und und und uns unsere unsere unsere unserm unter unter unterblieben untilgbar unzulänglich Venn Verband Verbindungen verblichenes verblüffende verbunden verglichen Verminderter verseuchter vertrauenswürdig von von von vor vorerst Voruntersuchungen vorwiegend waren wartende Weg weg Weise werden werden werden widerspiegeln wie wie wie wie wie wieder Winter wir wir wir wir wir wir Wir Wirbel wird wird wissen Wissenschaft wohl würde würde würden zehn zehn zeigt Zeit zu zugeschrieben zum zur zur zurücktreibt zusammenstießen Zustand zwei zwei Zweifelsohne überleben überzeugenden überzeugt – „Yesterday“

.

vierte Idee: Humber? gegoogelt: Flussdelta in Nordengland. a faded poster of Lakshmi? gegoogelt: die hinduistische Göttin des Glücks. funny jpegs? ich weiß nicht, warum Ross Sutherland keine funny .gifs nimmt. John Venn? auch jemand, der 1000 funny Internetbilder macht. Laryngophon? gegoogelt: Kehlkopfmikrofon.

.

und: ich war überrascht, dass “not a good day for [dieses], but not a bad day for [jenes]” kein feste Wendung ist. sounds very British.

.

alle sechs Abschnitte des Gedichts haben andere Zeilenschemata. die Stelle, die für mich am besten funktioniert:

.

The heart’s fractal. The clinical vision.

The exploded body. The bloodless incision.

.

fünfte Idee: vieles hängt hier durch, hat keine Spannung, läufts ins Leere, verliert sich, bleibt unentschieden. lieblose (weil erstbeste) Bilder wie “a quick sketch of the soul”, “the spaghetti programming of the heart”, “crepuscular statements”, “the flowcharts stack up like decommissioned fridges”, “the night resembles a parabola curve”, “the thick, blood-red line surfaces like an insane, contaminated salmon”. unsaubere Perspektiven (“my sweetness”, “your calipered eye”, aber: “the way she lifts her leg into the waiting car”). und:

.

Alle Anwesenden waren einer Meinung,

dass das Schwein eher hätte ins Spiel gebracht werden sollen.

.

da stimme ich zu: das Baby auf dem schwarzen Schwein, die Saloon-Kulisse, der schlecht gespielte Kellner mit dem Glasauge… da wirds dann schnell zur Farce. das kommt zu spät und halbherzig.

.

gerne gelesen? als Video hält es zwei Minuten meiner Aufmerksamkeit. die Printversion macht mich müde.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “my sweetness”, weil es dem Text die Spannung nimmt und viel zu früh signalisiert: hier treffen sich nicht zwei Liebende, auf Augenhöhe. hier wird gespielt, gequatscht, die Frau bleibt ein Objekt / Untersuchungs-Utensil.

.

später / danach:

“Big Brother” hat zwei große Probleme mit Begriffen, seit beinahe 15 Jahren: die Produzenten und die “Big Brother”-Stimme werden wütend, wenn Kandidaten sich als Teilnehmer eines “Projekts” bezeichnen. “Big Brother”, stellen sie klar ist kein Projekt. am wenigsten: ein Projekt, getragen von den Bewohnern. egal, wie es sich für sie, im Container, anfühlt.

Psychologen und Wissenschaftler werden wütend, wenn “Big Brother” “Experiment” genannt wird. denn Experimente brauchen eine Grundfrage: etwas soll be- oder widerlegt werden. ich fühle mich bei Lektüre von “Experiment to determine the Existence of Love” wie ein Kandidat, im falschen Container abgestellt: die Fragestellung passt nicht zum Text. die Vorgänge, Handlungen, Themen passen nicht zur Fragestellung. die Bildwelten und der Ton bleiben ironisch-lässig-windschiefe Spielereien. alles ist fadenscheinig, unfertig. half-assed.

.

Konstantin Ames vermutet, der Text bleibt half-assed, um sich gegen die typischen Kritikmuster und -Anforderungen des Creative Writing zu stellen: the pig should have been introduced earlier? ein “Fuck you” an die Schreibschulen.

.

Konstantin Ames übersetzt “a minimum of two strong drinks” mit “mindestens zwei Doppelstöckige” (toll. nie gehört!)

.

…und beschreibt Segment Nr. 5 das Auf und Ab einer Erektion? gehts da um Penisse, in Wirklichkeit?

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherland, “Jean-Claude van Damme”

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?)

ross sutherland second opinion

ross sutherland secod opinion 2

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 5, zu “A Second Opinion”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: stell dir vor, Ross Sutherland plant ein Rodeo. doch er reitet keine Pferde, sondern Metaphern, und falls sich eine Metapher bäumt, ihn abzuschütteln droht, erzwingt er einen Richtungswechsel, damit sie sich vergaloppiert. so lange, bis die Metapher umfällt, kollabiert, beim Pferdeschlachter endet. aus jeder dritten… wird Lasagne!

.

ein schiefes Bild? nein. mehr: “Metaphorgotten” nennt meine liebste Website für angewandte Erzählforschung, TVtropes.org, Metaphern, die sich so schwungvoll lange am Leben halten, dass sie… im Altersheim noch auf den Tischen tanzen: Vergleiche, bewusst absurd verselbstständigt. Sinnbilder, die sich so weit von ihrem ursprünglichen Bezug entfernen, dass sie unterwegs zu Rätselbildern werden.

.

Metaphern also, die kurz Zigaretten holen gehen. dabei ihr Gedächtnis verlieren. nach Kassel ziehen, sich die Haare tönen und fünf Jahre später… eine Tabakhandlung öffnen. verspielt. vieldeutig. absurd.

.

zweite Idee: “Eine zweite Meinung” ist über weite Strecken herzig, sympathisch und langweilig. denn Lyrik lebt von offenen und widersprüchlichen Bedeutungen, Lücken, Entweder-Oders: hat eine Zeile zu viele mögliche Lesarten, wird sie beliebig. stehen alle Worte nur im Wortsinn brav am richtigen Platz, bleibt es banal. ich kann weite Teile von Ross Sutherlands Gedichts wie einen Alltags- und Gebrauchstext lesen: mal wieder ein Ich. mal wieder ein Du. dieses Mal in einer drolligen Welt, in der Röntgenbilder auch das Gefühls- und Innenleben abbilden.

.

oder (Möglichkeit 2): mit einem drollig-durchgeknallten Ich-Erzähler, der so tut, als ob.

.

oder (3) mit einem nicht-so-drollig verrückten Ich-Erzähler, der im Wahn spricht.

.

oder (4) in einer Welt wie unserer, in der zwei unglückliche Menschen in Metaphern die Zukunft ihrer Liebe verhandeln. ohne aber, dabei tatsächlich an “Gefühls-Röntgenbilder” zu glauben.

.

egal: verstehen lässt sich das Hin und Her zwischen einem aufgewühlten Ich (“I told you what was in my heart.”) und einem “naturally” skeptischen Du (“You told me to prove it”) auf all diesen Ebenen mühelos, und welches die “korrekte” Ebene ist (und wer das festlegt: Ross Sutherland?), muss / kann – das ist das große Glück, die große Chance von Lyrik – nicht entschieden werden. aber: vier solcher simpler Lesarten heißt nur: simpel mal vier. das ist noch nicht, was ich mir wünsche, wenn ich die “offenen und widersprüchlichen Bedeutungen, Lücken, Entweder-Oders” guter Lyrik lobe.

.

dritte Idee: denn trotz dieser vier Ebenen ist alles recht eindeutig erzählt, egal, ob nun Traum- oder Wahnwelt, Magie, Spinnerei oder bloß grauer Alltag dahinter stecken. Konstantin Ames’ Kommentar erklärt, wie literarisch bekannt / verbraucht die einzelnen Motive auf dem Röntgenbild auf ihn wirken. auch mir fehlt über weite Teile des Texts Raffinesse. bis dann die – tollen – “Metaphorgotten”-Rätselbilder kommen:

.

ich kann mir zusammen reimen, warum ein Stück menschlichen Innenlebens mit einem “collapsing pier” verglichen wird. aber was genau “bedeuten” die Stare?

.

“ein leerer Kleiderschrank”? gekauft! “ein toter Fuchs”? leuchtet mir ein. aber warum überlappen sich Kleiderschrank und Fuchs? hier wird es mehrdeutig. absurd und spannend: eine Röntgenaufnahme eines Brustkorbs wird vor ein Fenster gehalten und Nachbarn schauen darauf wie auf ein exhumiertes Grab, und das alles – das Innenleben des Erzählers = ein Bild seines Brustkorbs = ein exhumiertes Grab – sieht aus wie / erinnert an / kommt dem Erzähler vor wie “ein Skelett, das im Schornstein fest steckt”.

.

mein Innenleben ist eine Röntgenaufnahme ist ein exhumiertes Grab ist ein Skelett, das im Schornstein fest steckt. großartig!

.

vierte Idee: am Ende wird die Röntgenaufnahme (also: das Innenleben = das exhumierte Grab = das Skelett im Schornstein?) mit einem Septemberabend (…oder dem Bild eines Septemberabends) gleich gesetzt, der milde wirkt, doch dem man besser nur im Mantel entgegen treten sollte. “Ich habe darauf vertraut, dass du deinen Mantel mit dir nimmst” “on your way out” schiebt einen realen Ort, die Wohnung und das Wetter vor den Fenstern, gegen einen bildlichen: Geht das Du in die Welt des Röntgenbilds hinein… oder aus dem Apartment hinaus?

.

“Wenn du einen Platz in meinem Herzen willst, zieh dich warm an!” oder doch “Du bist schon halb zur Tür / aus unserer Beziehung raus: Und draußen, allein im echten Leben, ist es so kühl wie in meiner Brust. Erkälte dich nicht, wenn du gleich gehst und mich alleine lässt!”

.

fünfte Idee: “Occasionally you wonder if [Ross Sutherland] might be a parody of a poet and the joke is on us”, schreibt Tim Clare (Link). das ist hier, bei “A Second Opinion”, stärker als in allen sechs anderen Texten als Kompliment zu lesen: “Eine zweite Meinung” ist witzig, ohne albern zu sein. pointiert, aber nicht auf billige Pointen aus. ein süffiger, leichter, eindrücklicher Text. verständlich. aber – durch die Metaphern-Matryoshkas - geheimnisvoll statt platt.

.

gerne gelesen? ja. ich kann verstehen, dass es unter den “comment”-Kommentatoren das bisher beliebteste Ross-Sutherland-Gedicht ist.

.

schlechtestes Wort: zu viele amerikanische (Anfänger-)Kurzgeschichten, schrieb ein Creative-Writing-Professor oder New Yorker-Redakteur mal, enden mit dem Wort “home”. für mich setzt “on your way out” hier einen ähnlichen, etwas abgenutzten Effekt.

.

später / danach:

.

dass Ärzte oft eine zweite Meinung einholen, macht Sinn. dass Partner aber herumzweifeln, gar nicht wissen, was sie sehen und wie sie es bewerten sollen, am Ende sogar die Nachbarn um Kommentare bitten… greift gut, als böse, resignierte Metapher: ich habe dir mein Herz ausgeschüttet. aber du erkennst nichts. kannst mich nicht lesen, interpretieren, erkennen. und richtest dich nach den Meinungen der erstbesten Gaffer.

.

keine Song-Assoziation, dieses Mal. aber eine Idee, um eigene Metaphorgotten-Rätselbildketten zu schreiben: eine Aufzählung wie in R. Kellys “The World’s Greatest” wird spannender und komplizierter, sobald alle Vergleiche aufeinander Bezug nehmen statt immer nur auf das selbe Erzähler-Ich. “I am a mountain / I am a tall tree / Oh, I am a swift wind / Sweepin’ the country”? lieber “Ich bin ein Berg, groß wie ein Baum. Ein Baum, schnell wie ein Wind” usw.

.

mich enttäuscht, dass weder “Rorschach Ultrasound” noch “Rorschach X-Ray” gute Ergebnisse in der Google-Bildersuche bringen: beide medizinischen Techniken machen ein Innenleben sichtbar. aber sind für Laien schwer zu lesen.

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »Experiment to determine the Existence of Love«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?)

Ross Sutherland Richard Branson

90210-surfboard ross sutherland

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 4, zu “Richard Branson”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: ich schrieb nie eigene Gedichte. keine Lyrik aus 13 Jahren Unterricht hat mich erreicht / begeistert / überzeugt. ich kaufe (und verschenke) 200 Bücher jedes Jahr, doch habe noch nie einen einzigen Gedichtband bezahlt (halt: doch. aber kaum gelesen), ich habe keine Lieblings-Lyriker*innen und selbst Menschen, deren Lyrik ich oft mag (z.B. Monika RinckAndre Rudolph, aktuell besonders Malte Abraham) haben viel mehr Texte, die mich kalt lassen als solche, die mich begeistern. ich liebe Romane. Comics. Serien. viele Filme. aber Lyrik? schwyrik.

.

2007 habe ich für BELLA triste über 200 Seiten Texte-über-Lyrik lektoriert, und dann ein Jahr lang immer neue poetologische Antworten gesucht, gesammelt und herausgegeben: wer Gedichte schreibt, wählt jedes Wort sehr überlegt. und deshalb können Lyriker*innen oft um Welten präziser, klüger über ihre Ansprüche, Sprache und Arbeit-mit-Sprache sprechen als alle anderen Künstler*innen: als Leser, als Journalist, als Literaturkritiker und Autor lerne ich SO viel, wenn Menschen über Lyrik sprechen. das lohnt sich jedes Mal!

.

zweite Idee: “Richard Branson” macht mir Mühe. setzt mich unter Druck. mehr als alle anderen Ross-Sutherland-Gedichte bisher:

.

ich kann (das wäre mir am liebsten) 18 kurze Gedichtzeilen lesen und bloggen, was diese Zeilen mit mir machen: was hängen bleibt. stört. reizt. gefällt. ins Auge sticht. oder mir misslungen scheint. es gibt ein Ich und ein “my love”, “cold hungover days” in Cambridge, eine weiße Sonne, unsympathische (?) Coworker und sieben Shreks, die in der Patsche hängen und weg laufen. das Ich bringt es nicht übers Herz, die Wahrheit zu sagen, das Du rückt (mütterlich? klammernd? herablassend?) die Krawatte zurecht, “ziehst sie fest und ich werde etwas älter”, und alles wirkt zu spät, verkniffen, vergeblich, verheimlicht und verpfuscht: “du denkst, dass du nur lange genug auf die Nudeln starren musst, um auf die Kombination des Safes zu kommen”.

.

um den resignierten, traurigen Zweikampf dieses Paares besser zu verstehen, hilft mir ein Blick auf einzelne Wendungen: “trapped in the era”, “it’s impossible”, “[the money] will end up spent”, “I don’t have the heart”, “I am small and glassy”. 18 Zeilen Text, die fünf solcher “das geht nicht gut aus. alle sind müde!”-Formulierungen enthalten. keine Frage: die Worte stehen da bewusst. absichtlich. das sind Effekte, an denen Autor*innen lange feilen: beim ersten Lesen ahne, spüre, fühle ich eine erste Stimmung. das Gedicht ist “traurig, irgendwie” – reime ich mir zusammen.

.

aber gehe ich wirklich noch mal kritisch, gründlicher durch alle Sätze,fällt auf, wie viel Mühe sich Lyrik mit solchen Sprach-Signalen gibt, um um Atmosphären, Stimmungen zu bauen: Ross Sutherlands 18 kurze Zeilen sind “irgendwie traurig”? das ist, als stünde ich einer Wohnung und denke “schick!” um dann zu merken: da stehen ja auch fünf Pianos. Statuen. Vasen voller Blumen! der Innenarchitekt hat in JEDE Ecke irgendwas gestellt, das signalisieren soll: “Oha. Edel!” so ähnlich wie die Frau, die 1990 im “Beverly Hills, 90210″-Pilotfilm durchs Bild läuft: vor der Armani-Boutique. im teuren Kostüm. mit Shopping Bags. und (Kalifornien!) einem Surfboard.

.

dritte Idee: die Codes für Stimmung und Gefühle, die Ross Sutherland hier setzt, kann ich (und jeder sonst) problemlos knacken. doch will ich “Richard Branson” tiefer verstehen, brauche ich schon wieder Google: ich bin sehr froh, dass Kuratorin Simone Kornappel mir etwas Arbeit abnimmt und erklärende Links in den Text streut. für eine gute Stunde surfe ich hin und her, lese ihre Texte, lerne dazu und puzzle mir folgende komplizierte-charmante Cambridge-Anekdote zusammen (ohne zu wissen, ob das noch irgendwas mit Ross Sutherlands Gedicht zu tun hat).

.

“okay, wait: so THIS lady“, schreibe ich auf Facebook, “made some Pulsar discovery in 1968 that got her colleagues a Nobel Prize …and led to THIS image…  that ‘appeared in the Cambridge Encyclopedia of Astronomy in 1977, which is where Joy Division drummer Stephen Morris saw the design.‘”

.

vierte Idee: wahrscheinlich ist das nur die Spitze des Bedeutungseisbergs – und ich müsste viel mehr über Cambridge, Rothko, Richard Branson und seine Platten- und Flugzeugfirma Virgin, Polarlicht und die Währung Südafrikas verstehen, um Ross Sutherlands Gedicht gerecht zu werden.

.

aber hätte Ross Sutherland diesen Aufwand verdient? ich bin mir sicher, in “Richard Branson” sind, wie in allen anderen Ross-Sutherland-Gedichten, Unmengen kleiner Scherze, Verweise, Anspielungen vergraben. doch ich bezweifle, dass die Bedeutungs-Nuggets, die ich da ausgraben könnte – für mich persönlich – spannend genug bleiben, um nach drei Stunden Beschäftigung mit dem Gedicht jede Zeile noch einmal tiefer, gründlicher umzugraben will: Google? verrat mir alles über Richard Bransons Projekte am Polarkreis. welcher Rothko-Print ist “klein und glasig”? und so weiter.

.

fünfte Idee: wäre ich mit Virgin, Richard Branson, Joy Division aufgewachsen, hätte ich Interesse an Rothko oder Cambridge (oder “Shrek”), ich würde tiefer graben. vielleicht versteht jeder Brite, warum Ross Sutherlands Gedicht “Richard Branson” heißt. Vielleicht würde ein deutscher Zwilling von Ross Sutherland sein Gedicht über eine scheiternde, schal gewordene Beziehung “Carsten Maschmeyer” nennen, oder “Rainer Calmund”.

.

gerne gelesen? nein. und ungern kommentiert: ohne Branson-Bezug fühle ich mich unqualifiziert, über “Richard Branson” zu schreiben.

.

schlechtestes Wort: nenn einen Künstler. den erstbesten! “Rothko.”

.

später / danach:

ein Freund von mir bewundert Feldherren, Taktiker, gemeine Strippenzieher. und… Apple. wenn er Steve Jobs beschreibt, verschwimmt seine Bewunderung zu einem seltsamen psychologischen Helden-Brei. in einer meiner Lieblingsszenen aus “Mad Men” sollen Hundehalter über den Charakter ihres Hundes sprechen. doch sofort wird klar: niemand beschreibt den Hund. jeder Hundehalter erzählt, wie er selbst gerne wäre. ein Wunschtraum, projiziert auf die Tiere. dass sich Ross Sutherland mit Richard Branson eine fleischgewordene Midlife-Crisis sucht, langweilt und nervt mich: Branson, Zangief, Jean-Claude van Damme… wo liegt der Reiz all dieser alten Herren?

.

nicht mal ein halbwegs passender Song fällt mir hier ein: vielleicht die Counting Crows? auch dort hadert oft ein trauriges Ich mit einem fernen Du.

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »A Second Opinion«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

kinder-magic-farewell-presents (1)

ross sutherland infinite lives

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 3, zu “Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again)”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: Kinderperspektiven langweilen mich. weil Kinder wenig schaffen, wissen, planen, das meiste verpatzen – und ihre Geschichte oft passiv und beschränkt erleben. viele Autor*innen wollen eine “ist das nicht putzig, magisch, zauberhaft und drollig?”-Stimmung erzwingen. doch Kinderhelden gehen mir auf die Nerven: mein Kindsein war schleppend, wirkungslos und dumm, und wer über das Glück des Kindseins schreiben will und nur den immer gleichen abgegriffenen Kinder-Kitschkram findet (“Das Sofa war eine Insel! Der Garten ein Dschungel! Mein Bett eine kuschelige Höhle! Unser Sommer wollte niemals enden!”), verliert meinen Respekt: Texte sind, wie alles andere, in 9 von 10 Fällen Schrott. doch Kindertexte leider: in 98 von 100 Fällen. dünnes Eis, Ross Sutherland.

.

zweite Idee: das ist mein dritter Ross-Sutherland-Text. und der erste, der so britisch (schottisch?) erzählt, dass ich mir direkt Google zu Hilfe hole:

“try try try again” stammt vom britischen Pädagogen William Hickson.

.

sind “lounges” und “living rooms” das selbe?

.
haben Yorkie Easter Eggs immer diese Bagger- und Baustellen-Verpackung? ist das ein Schoko-Osterei für Jungs?

.
Dixons ist eine Elektronik- und Haushaltswaren-Kette: “Saturn” in Britisch? aber es gibt keine Barmänner bei Dixons, oder? keinen Werbespot oder Dixons-Film (und dessen Outtakes), in dem eine Bar vorkommt?

.

dritte Idee: viele kleine Effekte, Akzente im Text gefallen mir: wer steuert das leichte Fahrzeug (oder: Raumschiff?) über den Kaminsims? nicht “me”, nicht “my hand”, sondern “my mind”, denn diese Lenkmanöver werden im (Kinder-)Kopf geboren. der Erzähler weiß und betont das: Space Battles im Wohnzimmer sind Kopfsache!

.

das selbe Kind, die selbe Kinderfantasie lässt “a billion ships” verbrennen und macht einem Yorkie-Ei den selben kurzen Prozess wie die “Star Wars”-Rebellen dem Todesstern. mich überzeugt auch die Fantasie, dass das Familienauto vom Weg abkommt, das Kind auf die Straße geschleudert wird und dann, Kopf voran, über eine Kreuzung rutscht / schlittert wie ein feuchtes Bier über den Tresen: für Kinder ist der Tod denkbarer, simpler, wenig tabuisiert. und wer alt genug für “Star Wars” ist, hat genug Autounfälle im Film gesehen. leichtfertig übers schnelle Sterben reden? machen Kinder oft. passt gut! gefällt mir sehr.

.

zu dieser Leseweise passt auch der Titel: wer “unendlich viele Leben” hat in einem Videospiel, kann rumspinnen, alles ausprobieren, sich Zeit lassen. toben. Quatsch machen. wie ein Kind! am schönsten / besten aber gefällt mir eine Kleinigkeit: die Eltern spielen im Urlaub zusammen ein Spiel, in dem man Steine aneinanderfügen muss und hoffen, dass sie passen. eine schöne Metapher für: “Meine Eltern lieben sich, und haben versucht, zusammen zu passen”…?

.

vierte Idee: müsste ich als Lektor mit “Infinite Lives” arbeiten, hätte ich eine Menge kleiner sprachlicher Kritikpunkte an Ross Sutherland: das lyrische Ich spielt nicht im eigenen Wohnzimmer, sondern bei irgend einem “Du”, das eine Großmutter hat. doch beide Figuren, Großmutter und Du, spielen sofort keine weitere Rolle. ich verstehe nicht, was mit dem Pkw-Armaturenbrett passiert: bauen es die Eltern beim Domino-Spielen in Frankreich immer wieder nach / um (“reconstructing” = umbauen), oder baut das Ich als Kind im Kopf immer neue Spielwelten auf diesem Armaturenbrett (“reconstructing” = in der Vorstellung neu aufbauen), bevor es aus dem Auto geschleudert wird? Kinder sitzen im Auto meist hinten: das Armaturenbrett ist ihrem Blickfeld recht fern.

.

auch, was die Barkeeper tun, kann ich mir nicht erklären: Das Ich glaubt, sie seien “Simulanten” / “Fakers”, während (?) es zusieht, wie sie ein Bier “die Theke entlang schubsen”? wann sehen Kinder Wirte? und dass diese Wirte doch keine Fakers sind, wird dem Erzähler klar, als er die gelöschten und verpfuschten Szenen durchkuckt, die Outtakes? wo sieht er diese Szenen? wer zeigt sie ihm? was ist dort zu sehen: wie Barkeeper daran scheitern, ein Bier über den Tresen zu schubsen? das Bier herunterfällt? das “Wieder und wieder durchprobieren, bis es klappt”-Motiv dieser Strophe passt zum Titel. doch ich weiß nicht, welche echte, konkrete Bar-Szene im Leben eines Kindes ich mir hier vorstellen soll, und welche “Outtakes” denkbar wären. gefällt mir nicht.

.

fünfte Idee: zum ersten Mal will ich auch Übersetzer Konstantin Ames an vielen Stellen widersprechen: “Infinite Lives” wären in der Videospiel-Logik besser “unendlich / ewig VIELE” Leben, nicht (ein) “ewiges Leben”. “um eine Lounge dreidimensional zu erfassen” ist mir zu technisch und schwammig: vielleicht besser “um alle drei Dimensionen eines Wohnzimmer zu verstehen”? statt “Nebeln” würde ich “Sternennebel” übersetzen und besser “Kaminsims” statt “-verkleidung”. [Edit: Konstantin Ames erinnert mich, dass er "Ewige Leben" übersetzt hat, im Singular: Das passt also. Ich habe schlampig gelesen!]

am wichtigsten: das Kind stürzt aus dem Auto und rutscht über die Kreuzung. da ist mir “segeln” als Verb zu sanft: der Kopf soll bitte “schlittern”, “klatschen”, “schäumen”. Hirnmasse! Blut! so nass wie Bierglas oder -flasche über den Tresen! das volle Kinderfantasie-Horrorprogramm.

.

gerne gelesen? sehr gerne, ja. nur kommt es mir unfertig vor, schlecht überlegt, an vielen Stellen fadenscheinig. Mr. Sutherland, was haben Sie sich dabei gedacht? ich glaube nicht, dass Ross Sutherland hier die besten Worte fand, um zu zeigen, was er zeigen wollte.

.

schlechtestes Wort: die “glittering skies” über Frankreich langweilen mich; und ich google seit zehn Minuten, was die “last words of the Death Star” gewesen sein sollen (“Standy, standby”? Oder Großmuff Tarkins “You may fire when ready”?). der sympathisch-flapsig-abrupte Abschluss, “OK I finally get it” gefällt mir sehr… nur kapiere ich selbst den Heureka-Moment des Gedichts (oder mindestens: die Outtake-Bartender-Bier-Theken-Situation) kein Bisschen. und deshalb ärgert mich das “alles klar!”, “OK, endlich hab ichs raus!” am Ende eines Textes, den ich nicht raus habe. und der vielleicht einfach zu schlecht / unklar geschrieben ist, als dass ein Leser es raus kriegen könnte…?

.

später / danach:

.

ich weiß nicht, warum man als Science-Fiction-begeistertes Kind ausgerechnet bei der Fahrt Richtung Elektromarkt (!) Todesfantasien hat.

.

ich freue mich, dass “try, try, try again” bei William Hickson vermutlich eher stoisch und ermahnend gemeint war: “Übung macht den Meister”, “Immer wieder von vorne anfangen!”, “Arbeit, Arbeit, Arbeit”… doch in der Videospiel-Welt ganz risikoarm, leichtfertig benutzt wird, als Versprechen: “Einfach von vorne! Keine Konsequenzen! Nichts kann schief gehen!”

.

Konstantin Ames fragt nach den Traumata und ECHTEN Unfällen, die eine Kindheit enden lassen, und kommentiert: “Eine durchaus mögliche Lesart ist die einer herbeigewünschten Katastrophe, die dann tatsächlich eingetreten ist; ein schrecklicher Autounfall, die für die Sprechinstanz beinahe tödlich endete, auch das abrupte Ende eines Kindheit; ein Trauma, dass auch der Suff nicht beheben konnte.”

.

Kristoffer Cornils fragt ähnlich: “Irgendwo lauert immer »some great crash yet to come«, vielleicht wird er sogar herbeigesehnt. Um mal auszuprobieren, ob es wirklich Infinite Lives, unendlich Leben, in diesem einen gibt. Kurz speichern, was riskieren, dabei draufgehen, resetten und entspannt von vorn anfangen. Easy, oder?”

.

Ross Sutherland veranstaltete 2009 einen “upbeat” Comedy- und Literaturabend namens “Infinite Lives”: “Last year, ESA (the Entertainment Software Agency) revealed that the average age of the most frequent game player is 33 years old. The children who began buying video games for their Atari 2600 in 1982 are still gripped 25 years later, somehow incapable of putting down the game controller and doing anything constructive, like putting up a shelf. No longer the preserve of childhood, video games have become a global phenomenon rippling though popular culture, influencing film, music, art, and even philosophy. Realising they are the same age as Pacman, three authors come together to produce an evening of entertainment dedicated to the secret language of computer games.”

.

Protest gegen Produkte wie das “It’s not for Girls”-Yorkie-Egg sortiert sich u.a. unter dem Twitter-Hashtag #ichkaufdasnicht

.

das schönste Lampenschirm-Großmutter-Wohnzimmer-Kaminsims-Foto aus Großbritannien, das ich kenne, ist hier.

.

mein britischer Lieblings-Kindheits-Kitschsong ist “The Summerhouse” von The Divine Comedy.

.

gelungene Kinderfiguren und -perspektiven? z.B. in Tove Janssons “Sommerbuch”, Ágota Kristófs “Das große Heft”, Carson McCullers’ “Frankie” und Harper Lees “Wer die Nachtigall stört”

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »Richard Branson«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

zangief 2 ross sutherland

zangief ross sutherland.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 2, zu “Zangief”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: Gott. Zangief. so viele Figuren hätte ich als Kind gerne persönlich gekannt (eine Liste meiner Kindheits-Helden ist HIER, eine Liste der Videospiele, die für mich wichtig waren HIER): ich hätte von Dagobert Duck, Papa Schlumpf oder Donatello von den “Turtles” gelernt. Mrs. Brisby oder die Cosbys hätten mich gemocht… und würde ich morgen im “Street Fighter”-Universum aufwachen, ich denke, Chun-Li oder Dhalsim, notfalls Blanka, E. Honda, M. Bison würden mit mir Kaffee trinken: DAS sind die Street Fighter, zu denen ich Anschlusspunkte sehe, die mich auf irgend einem Level interessieren, mir wenigstens als Konzept, Idee sympathisch sind. Zangief macht mir Angst. Zangief macht mich platt. Zangief gehörte ab 1992 (ich war acht oder neun) in die selbe Ecke, in der auch Pippi Langstrumpf lauert, Roseanne oder Bart Simpson: Wären Zangief und ich Teil der selben Realität… ich wäre erledigt. Zangief würde mich ZERSTÖREN.

.

haarig. verschwitzt. distanzlos. der tollwütige Blick. die engen Speedos. Bart und Frisur. und sein Spezial-Move, bei dem er den Kopf (!) des Gegners in den Boden rammt… als Heldencomic-Leser kenne ich eine MENGE schlechter, liebloser oder rassistischer Kämpfer- und Haudrauf-Figuren aus Russland. doch Zangief ist die widerlichste, brachialste Schablone für solche Vorurteile: mir gefällt, dass Ross Sutherland mit Rand- und Nebenfiguren meiner Kindheit literarisch arbeitet. aber wirklich: muss es Zangief sein?

.

zweite Idee: “Black Island”? gibt es eine vielleicht russische Insel, die… oha: “eine Insel des Kurilen-Archipels. Sie gehört zu Russland, wird aber von Japan als Teil der Unterpräfektur NemuroHokkaidō beansprucht.” Zangief ist die Karikatur eines russischen, chauvinistischen Unterdrückers, erfunden von japanischen Entwicklern. Konstantin Ames denkt das weiter: “Die Frage, die das Gedicht stellt, lautet: Warum sollte ein patriotischer Russe mit einem Bären ringen, der doch sein Land symbolisiert, und den er töten müsste, um den Kampf zu überleben? Wie würde er sich hinterher fühlen? Die Antwort darauf: Es wäre eine Tragödie.”

leider ist die Spielanleitung von Nintendo besser geschrieben, bildstärker, kulturell interessanter und macht mich nachdenklicher als das, was Ross Sutherland dann mit leierndem Rhythmus und Schwurbel-Kitsch-Klischeebildern hinzufügt. gefällt mir nicht.

.

dritte Idee: vielleicht langweilt mich “Zangief”, weil hier linear ein einziger simpler Ablauf beschrieben wird: Gedichte stellen Ideen, Worte, Fragen und Bilder gegeneinander, die in 1000 Spannungen und Widersprüchen stehen: nirgends reibt sich so viel offene, nicht abschließend erklär-, entscheidbare Bedeutung auf engstem Raum. mir missfällt die simple, superdick aufgetragene Mann-gegen-Tier-Geschichte, weil sie mich nicht zum Nachdenken bringt oder überrascht.

Ross Sutherland beschreibt die Szene distanziert – und hämisch: Mann und Bär (und also: ganz Russland?) sind “Amputierte”, der “Pelz stinkt nach Scheiße”, die Sinne sind “benebelt”, sogar das Brechen des Genicks klingt “wenig überzeugend”. Konstantin Ames übersetzt “Partner” als “Gespiele” und macht die Szene damit noch schmieriger, läppischer, hermetisch. die Adjektive? “leer”, “schmal”, “dünn”, “wenig überzeugt”: ein dürftiger, trauriger Kampf.

.

vierte Idee: Ross Sutherlands “nude III” warf für mich spannende Fragen auf. “Zangief” bleibt zu fadenscheinig, und ich frage ungeduldig und genervt: warum sieht der tote Bär als Bärenleiche auf dem Eis (?), aus wie “eine Flächenkarte von Russland”? unter dem Eis ist “rötlicher Schlick” (nein: auf dem Eis klebt Blut)? “he bleeds until he sees those stars again”: kann man auf der Insel (wegen den Bäumen?) keine Sterne sehen, sondern nur am Boot? geht es, wie Kristoffer Cornils vorschlägt, um kommunistische Sterne oder amerikanische Stars and Stripes? verstehe ich mehr, wenn ich über das Sternbild des Bären recherchiere? mir ist das alles zu vage. oder zu platt. missfällt mir.

.

letzte Idee: Zangief hat Pelz auf den SCHIENBEINEN. und: nur da. der Rest seiner Beine ist haarlos.

.

gerne gelesen? nein. eine unnahbare, platte und unsympathische Figur wird in einer Sprache beschrieben, die mir falsch, lieblos und aufgesetzt erscheint. “Street Fighter” handelt von Zweikämpfen. die ganze Spielreihe fragt seit über 20 Jahren neu, was passiert, wenn ZWEI Figuren, meist aus verschiedenen Ländern, aufeinander treffen. vielleicht fehlt Ross Sutherland hier vor allem ein würdiges Gegengewicht: der tote, traurige Bär auf dieser schwarzen Insel voll Eis ist kein interessanter / interessant beschriebener Gegner. oder “Gespiele”.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “a waltz, a final dance” / “ein Walzer, ein letzter Tanz”: muss JE-DER Zweikampf auf den Tod immer mit einem TANZ verglichen werden? JE-DES Mal? von einem guten Lyriker erwarte ich mehr.

.


zangief 3

.

später / danach:
.

“the claw lacerations masked by ginseng” passt nicht ins Reimschema. ich stolpere bei jedem Lesen.

.

“Zangief loves his country. But he loves to stomp on his opponents even more”: ich denke an die totalitäre Welt (und ein konkretes Zitat: “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stomping on a human face — forever.”) aus George Orwells (tollem, zurecht geliebten) “1984″ und frage mich, ob die amerikanischen Super-Nintendo-Bedienungsanleitungs-Autoren oder die japanischen Capcom-Programmierer Ende der 80er ABSICHTLICH den (totalitären) Russen zum (totalitären) Stampfer machten.

.

…und wurde Zangief von Mr. Ts Rolle in “Rocky 3″ inspiriert?

.

“a man who wrestles bears for fun” = “ein Mann, der aus Übermut mit Bären ringt”? lieber hätte ich die Orginal-Übersetzung der deutschen Spielanleitung gelesen, von ca. 1991.

.

“narrow skull” = “die schmale Rummel”? Kompliment an Übersetzer Konstantin Ames. ein Bärenschädel wird “Rummel” genannt?

.

ich verstehe, dass Zangief ein Schönheitsideal trifft, vor allem bei schwulen “Bears”. er erinnert mich an japanische Bara-Manga und ich freue mich, dass ihn Fans auf Tumblr oft liebenswerter, tapsiger, Winnie-Puh-hafter darstellen als in den offiziellen Spielen. aber: ich verstehe, was Typen wie DIESEN Mann attraktiv macht. vor Zangief selbst habe ich weiterhin… NUR Angst.

.

Ross Sutherland hat über alle 12 “Street Fighter II”-Figuren Gedichte geschrieben, jeden Text von Illustrator*innen gestalten lassen und sie als eBook veröffentlicht. erst, als ich diese eBook-Ankündigung lese, merke ich, dass da “Sonnet” steht, nicht einfach “Gedicht”. erklärt das die Spalten, Zeilenumbrüche, den Rhythmus? hat Ross Sutherland ein “korrektes” Zangief-Sonett geschrieben?

.

Zangiefs “prototypical name”, verrät das “Street Fighter”-Wiki, “was Vodka Gobalsky.” na dann!

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again)«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

bleichweiß grau ockerfarben sepia dämmrig, Stefan Mesch zu Ross Sutherland

 

bleichweiß grau ockerfarben sepia dämmrig 2

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 1, zu “nude III”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: “bleichweiß”, “grau”, “ockerfarben”, “sepia”… und “dämmrig”. mir gefällt, wie man in fünf Worten eine ganze Farbpalette, Lichtstimmung durch einen Text streuen kann: hier funktionieren die Farben wie Gewürze und sie beeinflussen, färben jedes Bild und jedes Wort. nur die “ockerfarbenen Freundinnen” missfallen mir. weil Ocker so ein erdig-unklar-nichtssagender Farbton ist. wollte Sutherland etwas sagen wie: “Die Freundinnen sind graue Mäuse und alle irgendwie gleich“? oder waren sie im Solarium? oder sind sie dunkelhäutig?

so oder so: die Frauen hätten mehr Mühe, einen genaueren Blick verdient.

.

zweite Idee: ein Dutzend offener Fragen. mir gefällt das! gehen Kinder in die “Schule der Gebrochenen Hälse”, um sich den Hals brechen zu lassen? oder läuft das wie in einer “Rückenschule”: Leute lassen sich dort behandeln? wozu hat Bethlehem ein Kniffel-Institut? welchem See soll der Stöpsel gezogen werden?

.

am wichtigsten: WO spielt dieses Gedicht? an einer Universität, die “weltbekannt” dafür (oder: “famos” darin?)  ist, ihre Farbe zu wechseln? hin und her zwischen “bleichweiß” und “grau”? und draußen, auf der Straße vor der Uni, verbreiten die Laternen Sepia-Licht? und vielleicht hat der Himmel die FARBE von “Warteschleifenmusik”? klingt alles sehr verwaschen. traurig.

.

dritte Idee: vielleicht geht es Ross Sutherland um Basics, Standards, Ursprünge / das Erste, Einfache, Primitive… und auf der Gegenseite: das, was danach kommt: “Zivilisation”. Kultur. Errungenschaften. Vergeistigung. Moral.

.

“Reptilian Brain” ist der Teil des Gehirns, den höhere Lebewesen mit Echsen gemeinsam haben: das einfachste Betriebssystem, das unsere wichtigsten, aber primitivsten Grundfunktionen lenkt. Ross Sutherland schreibt über eine Uni und eine “Legende” (warum “Legende”?), “wonach die höheren Aufgaben einer Universität um ein altes Reptiliengehirn angesiedelt sind”. was sind das für universitäre Aufgaben? gehört in-der-Bibliothek-”Festsitzen”(!)-und-kaum-aufstehen-Können dazu?

.

im Gedicht kommen viele Menschen vor: Hockeyspieler, die Freundinnen “knallen”. Freundinnen, die von Hockeyspielern geknallt werden. “Junge Gemüter” in der Bibliothek. Leute im Imbisswagen, die abends ihre Abrechnung machen (und also: sich ums Geld kümmern. nicht darum, Leuten noch Essen anzubieten). “Das letzte Mitglied einer Improgruppe”, das uralten Heavy Metal hört, und – sicher kein Teil der Uni und ihrer “höheren Aufgaben” – “Azubikrankenschwestern”, die gut gelaunt die Arme “schlenkern”. mir gefällt die Grundfrage: was bringen Unis? was ist Zivilisation? oder auch: wenn du abends über einen Uni-Campus gehst und nachsiehst, wer sich dort bewegt: wie viel “Zivilisation” und “Höheres” siehst du?

.

vierte Idee: ich mag Zivilisation. ich mag Unis. ich mag die Gegenwart. viele “früher war alles besser!”-Menschen schreiben “früher war alles besser!”-TEXTE, indem sie wütend, müde oder gelangweilt aufzählen, welche Neuerungen sie selbst für unnötig halten, oder für ein Zeichen von “Dekadenz”.

.

Ross Sutherland zählt hier Dinge / Zivilisations-”Errungenschaften” auf, über die viele Menschen sagen würden “DAS braucht kein Mensch! DARAN kann man doch sehen, wie weit es schon gekommen ist: schöne neue Welt! WAS für ein Mist!” ein “Kniffelinsitut” (wer bezahlt so etwas? der Steuerzahler?), “passwortgeschützte Kurzgeschichten” (die armen Geschichten: jetzt werden sie versteckt und in Computern gefangen gehalten? wem nützt eine Geschichte, die von Computerprogrammen bewacht wird?), “junge Gemüter”, die “tief in der Bibliothek festsitzen” (die Jugend von heute! SO wird das nichts: Sesselfurzer, Theoretiker, Waschlappen!), ein “Imbisswagen, der geschlossen hat” (Hamburger machen dick! Untergang des Abendlandes!), die “Warteschleifenmusik des Himmels” (keine Musik ist verhasster als Warteschleifenmusik, und nichts ist sinnloser und entfremdeter, als in einer Warteschleife festzuhängen).

.

mir missfällt, dass diese Bilder vage “gegenwartskritisch” sind… und auf eine ganz langweilige, alte, konservative und uninteressante Art und Weise bekannt. brutale Hockeyspieler? passive Bücherwürmer? die EINZIGE etwas vielschichtigere, halb überraschende Figur im Text ist das Improgruppen-Mitglied, das Iron Maiden hört. schade.

.

letzte Idee: “Keller voller passwortschützter Kurzgeschichten” ist… blöd. ein unklares, schiefes Bild: was sind das für “Geschichten”? die Sexgeschichten der Hockeyspieler? mir missfällt das Original sogar noch mehr, denn dort heißt es “Basements hum with password-protected short stories”, die Keller BRUMMEN, SUMMEN, so LAUT ist der KRACH, den diese geheimnisvollen Geschichten da unten machen. huhu. bedeutungsschwanger.

.

gerne gelesen? ja. mir gefallen viele einzelne Bilder, Stimmungen im Text, mir gefällt, dass er so viel Welt abbilden will, so viele Figuren hat. und mir gefällt der Humor, der in Worten wie “Kniffelinsitut” auftaucht. insgesamt aber habe ich das Gefühl, hier wird – recht platt – Zivilisationskritik geübt und Unis sollen irgendwie “entlarvt” werden, als traurige, einsame, hässliche, sinnlose Orte.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “Legende”. Hirnforscher wissen SO viel – da muss man nicht von “Legenden”, Hörensagen, Märchen, Glaubensfragen sprechen. das Gehirn wird erforscht. und Unis, Lehrpläne usw. werden geplant, ganz rational und offen. das Wort “Legende” wirkt hier auf mich… wie ein naives Verneblungs-Zauberwort. fehl am Platz.

.

später / danach:
.

auch “nude”, der Gedichttitel, könnte eine Farbe sein. aber welche?

.

wo sind “nude I” und “nude II”? Konstantin Ames hat recherchiert: “Das Gedicht gehört zum Eröffnungsteil eines zwölfteiligen Zyklus (http://www.rosssutherland.co.uk/main/book/twelve-nudes).”

.

“slam” (jemanden gegen etwas drücken, rummsen) und “Knallen” (poppen?), das ist ein großer Unterschied: bei “slam” denke ich an Hockeyspieler, die ihre Freundinnen ruppig-leidenschaftlich gegen den Umkleidespind stoßen. bei “Knallen” denke ich an Vergewaltigungen oder mindestens: lieblosen, schlechten Sex.

.

Farben, Grundstimmung und das Thema (“Wir beobachten die Menschen, Händler, Einwohner einer Stadt an einem grauen Abend”) haben mich an diesen kanadischen Song erinnert: “One Great City” von den Weakerthans.

.

Kristoffer Cornils nennt das “Sepia der Straßenbeleuchtung” “instagrammig”. Foto-Filter. Social-Media-Kitsch-Effekte. stimmt! vielleicht beschreibt das Gedicht eine Welt, die so aussieht. vielleicht aber (böse, hämische Vermutung) MAG Ross Sutherland solche Kitsch-Filter selbst und will mit seinen Farbbeschreibungen die eigenen Gedichte im selben Stil einfärben. ich werde drauf achten, wie gefärbt / inszeniert / Instagram-kitschig seine anderen Texte sind.

.

Kristoffer Cornils schreibt: “‘[O]chre girlfriends’, die von Hockeyteams misshandelt werden”. ich dachte “nur” an ruppiges Petting. Kristoffer Cornils an Misshandlung. oder ganze Gruppen-Vergewaltigungen? ich wünschte, Ross Sutherland hätte sich in der Beschreibung der Hockeyspieler und ihrer Freundinnen mehr Mühe gemacht: dann müssten wir nicht spekulieren, WIE schlecht es diesen Freundinnen geht, und WIE gefährlich oder böse diese Hockeyspieler sind.

.

und: Kristoffer Cornils war in Tokio. großartig! ich sebst bin seit 2009 einmal im Jahr für je drei Monate in Toronto. aber: warum Ross Sutherland dort eine “School of Broken Necks” ansiedelt, kann ich mir nicht erklären.

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »Zangief«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

Schwarze Schweine, verliebte Schuhe und Google als Aushilfs-Dichter: Ross Sutherland bei ¿Comment!

 

Ross Sutherlands Texte kamen gut an auf dem Blog. Sein Gedicht, „Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again)“ war einer der beliebtesten Beiträge überhaupt. Die Schüler erinnerten sich an die (konsolenreiche) Kindheit und diskutierten den Zusammenhang von Realität, Videospielen und Fantasie. Ross parodierte das eigene Gedicht und eine Schülerin ließ alle Ebenen in einem Gemälde zusammenfließen. Gezeichnet wurden auch schwarze Schweine und der Krieger Zangief im Kampf mit dem Bären – der Bär war aber nun deutlich im Vorteil. Simone Kornappel ließ Google Translator umdichten und kommentierte mit Hyperlinks. Die sorgten bei Profileser Kristoffer Cornils für soviel Verwirrung, dass er eine Debatte über Urheberrechte und Autorschaft begann, Stefan Mesch stellte derweil 99 Fragen an die Lyrik.

Die Schüler stritten besonders über „A second opinion“: Sind Liebesgedichte wirklich notwendig, fragten einige entnervt. Die Profileser kritisierten Ross’ Metaphorik als zu flach. „I just fell in love with this“, zeigten sich andere begeistert. Es entstanden eine Fotostrecke, ein Happy End und eine gesungene Britney Spears Version. Ein Video über verliebte Schuhe, ein letzter Brief vom inhaftierten Van Damme an seinen Sohn und ein Flarf-poem von gleich sechs Autoren sind nur einige der vielen Beiträge, die Schüler zu Ross posteten.

“After all, it’s all about having a dialogue, isn’t it? Let’s have it at eye level”, forderte Profileser Cornils zu Beginn des Projekts– mit der Diskussion zu Ross‘ Texten sollte er eigentlich zufrieden sein.

von Martina Koesling

QRcode-Material

Audio

google translation invinite lives

google translation nude

google translation richard branson

zwei Meinungen google translation

 

Dienstag, 18. November 2014, 19:00 Uhr, Eintritt frei
¿Comment! – Lesung und Installation mit Ross Sutherland, Konstantin Ames,Catherine Hales und Simone Kornappel  

 

Gedichte des schottischen Lyrikers und Kommentare seiner Leser, darunter Stefan Mesch, Kristoffer Cornils, Konstantin Ames sowie von Schülern der John F. Kennedy School, des Hildegard-Wegschneider Gymnasiums und des Paulsen Gymnasiums

Zweisprachige Lesung (deutsch/englisch)
Die Lettétage dankt allen Förderern und Partnern!

 

Lettrétage, Mehringdamm 61, Nähe U7/U6 Mehringdamm

 

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

 

Ross Sutherland wurde 1979 in Edinburgh geboren und arbeitet als Autor und Performer, Filmemacher und Dozent in Creative Writing. Er kombiniert live seine literarischen Texte mit Stand-Up-Elementen und Visuellem.

Sutherland veröffentlichte vier Gedichtbände, alle beim Londoner Independent Verlag Penned in the Margins:
„Things To Do Before You Leave Town“ (2009), „Twelve Nudes“ (2010), „Hyakuretsu Kyaku“ (2011) und „Emergency Window“ (2012).

 

Website von Ross Sutherland
foto_kornappel-(c) Ken Yamamoto

Kuratorin Simone Kornappel, 1978 in Bonn geboren, ist Mitherausgeberin der „Randnummer Literaturhefte“. Ihr Debütband „raumanzug“ ist derzeit in Arbeit und erscheint demnächst bei Luxbooks, Wiesbaden.

Kuratorisches Statement:

Jemand berichtet, ist aufmerksam. Ein Ich, das die anfallenden Unfallstellen genau untersucht, kommentiert. Dazu ein Hin und Her hinter den Kulissen. Absagen an. Einladungen zu. „preparation(s) for some crash yet to come”.

 

 

Zur Performance
hall of [variation von sachverhalt und falschen pfründen, vom bäumen der allee, e e e, durchgängig
zitierbar] wem?

 

In ihrer Inszenierung hebt Simone Kornappel darauf ab, die Verschränkung von literarischem Text (Schreiben) und Leserkommentaren (Lesen) widerzuspiegeln sowie die Mechanismen der digitalen in die analoge Welt zu übertragen. Die Texte werden wie Räume durchschritten, der Raum wie ein Text gelesen. Kornappel arbeitet daher in der Lettrétage mit verschiedenen Medien und Raumelementen wie einer live durchgeführten Twitter-Session, Audioaufnahmen von beteiligten Schülern und mit Kommentaren bedruckten Post-it‘s und Papierknäueln.

 

Gedichte von Ross Sutherland (e/dt)

Kommentare zu den Gedichten Ross Sutherlands

 

Video zum Gedicht My shoes are in love

1 2