Suchergebnisse für ames

 

 

Dienstag, 18. November 2014, 19:00 Uhr, Eintritt frei
¿Comment! – Lesung & Installation mit Ross Sutherland und Konstantin Ames, Catherine Hales und Simone Kornappel

 

Gedichte des schottischen Lyrikers und Kommentare seiner Leser, darunter Stefan Mesch, Kristoffer Cornils, Konstantin Ames sowie von Schülern der John F. Kennedy School, des Hildegard-Wegschneider Gymnasiums und des Paulsen Gymnasiums

Zweisprachige Lesung (deutsch/englisch)
Die Lettétage dankt allen Förderern und Partnern!

 

Lettrétage, Mehringdamm 61, Nähe U7/U6 Mehringdamm

 

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

 

Ross Sutherland wurde 1979 in Edinburgh geboren und arbeitet als Autor und Performer, Filmemacher und Dozent in Creative Writing. Er kombiniert live seine literarischen Texte mit Stand-Up-Elementen und Visuellem.

Sutherland veröffentlichte vier Gedichtbände, alle beim Londoner Independent Verlag Penned in the Margins:
„Things To Do Before You Leave Town“ (2009), „Twelve Nudes“ (2010), „Hyakuretsu Kyaku“ (2011) und „Emergency Window“ (2012).

 

Website von Ross Sutherland

     

     

     
foto_kornappel-(c) Ken Yamamoto

Kuratorin Simone Kornappel, 1978 in Bonn geboren, ist Mitherausgeberin der „Randnummer Literaturhefte“. Ihr Debütband „raumanzug“ ist derzeit in Arbeit und erscheint demnächst bei Luxbooks, Wiesbaden.

Kuratorisches Statement:

Jemand berichtet, ist aufmerksam. Ein Ich, das die anfallenden Unfallstellen genau untersucht, kommentiert. Dazu ein Hin und Her hinter den Kulissen. Absagen an. Einladungen zu. „preparation(s) for some crash yet to come”.

 

 

Zur Performance
hall of [variation von sachverhalt und falschen pfründen, vom bäumen der allee, e e e, durchgängig
zitierbar] wem?

 

In ihrer Inszenierung hebt Simone Kornappel darauf ab, die Verschränkung von literarischem Text (Schreiben) und Leserkommentaren (Lesen) widerzuspiegeln sowie die Mechanismen der digitalen in die analoge Welt zu übertragen. Die Texte werden wie Räume durchschritten, der Raum wie ein Text gelesen. Kornappel arbeitet daher in der Lettrétage mit verschiedenen Medien und Raumelementen wie einer live durchgeführten Twitter-Session, Audioaufnahmen von beteiligten Schülern und mit Kommentaren bedruckten Post-it‘s und Papierknäueln.

 

Gedichte von Ross Sutherland (e/dt)

Kommentare zu den Gedichten Ross Sutherlands

 

von Katharina Deloglu

 

Video zum Gedicht My shoes are in love

100 Fragen an die Lyrik, Stefan Mesch

In September of 2014, Literaturhaus Lettrétage invited me to write about 7 poems of British author Ross Sutherland for “comment – lesenistschreiben”, a Berlin-based project that encouraged students and whole school courses to react to contemporary writers.

.

Once I was done with my initial 7 statements, Literaturhaus Lettrétage solicited another, final text:

.

Over three weeks in September and October, my assignment grew into this essay.

.

It is written for (German) high school students and it has some links to Ross Sutherland and the “comment” project.

.

Still: You don’t need to know anything about Ross or the project to enjoy my text. I worked with similar lists in the past (link 1, link 2, link 3), and if you want to syndicate this text and / or publish a German translation of it – please get in touch: smesch@gmx.net   

.

.


“Dogs are so tricky!” Does poetry matter?

.

Stefan Mesch

.
01_I don’t know any people who read poetry… that aren’t poets themselves.

.

02_Have you ever spent money on a poetry collection?

.

03_Did you ever copy, photograph or forward a poem? They’re easy to pirate / collect / archive / spread around. Why aren’t we doing that – all the time?

.

04_Why aren’t there poems in Happy Meals? On street corners? In every issue of Der Spiegel? Poetry doesn’t take much space: Why isn’t it more present in public life?

.

05_What’s the use of studying poems in school?

.

06_What’s the use of learning poems by heart?

.

07_Would you rather read 10 poems by 10 people… or 10 poems by one poet? What’s the difference between reading the first poem by Ross Sutherland and the 7th? Does reading the 7th make you want to read another 7? Or buy one of his poetry collections?

.

08_Would you rather meet someone who wrote poems – or someone who read them? Would you rather be known as a poet… or as a reader of poems?

.

09_Where can you go to find new poetry? Where can you get specific, personal recommendations? What prizes, festivals, literary magazines, experts, curators, critics, websites and poetry publishers do you know… and trust / like?

.

10_Why isn’t there a Netflix- or last.fm-like poetry recommendation streaming service that helps you curate a personal poetry stream?

.

11_Why isn’t there a social cataloging site that lets you rate poems? And if there was: What would end up as their best-rated, most popular one? Plucky, affirmative, hopeful poems like Hermann Hesse’s „Stufen“? Christian / religious wisdom? Love poems? Limericks and comedy? Nostalgic rhymes for children?

.

12_Imagine you wanted to learn about Japan. Or Poland. Would you learn more by reading 100 Japanese (or Polish) poems – or 100 pages of a novel? By looking at 100 adverts? Or 30 music videos? 100 pieces of photojournalism? What different things could you learn from each format?

.

13_The more you know about a culture and a language, the better you’ll be able to understand the nuances of their poems. That being said: Would you rather read poems written by your cousin – or by someone with a completely different home, culture, background?

.

14_If you had never heard of Ross Sutherland: Would you have noticed that these poems were written by a man? A young person? A Brit? A white person?

.

15_As a German: When you read Ross Sutherland, are you reading “a poem” or “something British”? What stands out: Ross’ British-ness or Ross’ poems-as-poetry?

.

16_Name three famous poets… who are still alive.

.

17_Name one famous poet still alive… who is famous for his or her poetry: no novelists or playwrights or Bob Dylans who publish poetry on the side!

.

18_Close your eyes. Imagine a male poet. Imagine a female poet. Who is younger? Funnier? Sexier? Smarter? More widely-read? Angrier? Dorkier? More confident? More serious? More respected?

.

19_If poems are nowhere in our culture – why bother with them in the curriculum? Shouldn’t we study video games, instead?

.

20_Are poems “nowhere in our culture”? If not: Where ARE they, actually?

.

21_My poet friends seem angrier, more political and disenfranchised than my novelist friends. Maybe because they are used to getting the short end of the stick? Less recognition? Less money? Less respect?

.

22_Why are novels more popular than poems, and why are the media more eager to praise and feature novelists? Has it always been that way, historically? Is there a way this could change?

.

23_Are movies “more inviting” than novels? Are novels “easier” than poems? Why is poetry considered such a “difficult” and “problematic” format?

.

24_Are “difficult” and “problematic” the same thing?

.

25_Imagine a poetry reading at Literaturhaus Lettrétage: What would need to happen for you to buy a ticket? (Bilingual would be good. Verses on a projector would be good. Some sort of discussion and Q&A would be great! Also: guests with different positions and backgrounds. Diversity!)

.

26_Poet Sabine Scho asks: Why do people enjoy dissing poetry?

.

27_I’d counter: Why does poetry leave nearly everyone cold?

.

28_It’s time-consuming to pick a favorite movie director, because sampling even one director’s work will take you 90+ minutes. It’s easy to buy a collection like „Lyrik von jetzt“ and start finding favorites. What are you waiting for?

.

29_Are poems less present because they are hard to market and commodify? 10 years ago, “personal” cell phone ring tones were a gold mine. Could something similar happen to poems? A digital poetry gift service? A WhatsApp subscription store? Are poems on the fringe because no one has found a way to make quick money from them yet?

.

30_But then: Hardly anyone makes money from webcomics, either. And THEY have a huge online presence and millions of passionate fans.

.

31_This webcomic audience is pretty young, though: many tweens, teenagers and college students. Do poets reach these audiences? Is poetry TRYING to reach these audiences? Are there poems on Instagram? Poets on Vine? Are there tumblr-famous Young Adult poets I’ve never heard of?

.

32_Sabine Scho loves that, because poetry is little-read, she can get crap past the radar: “There is no place you can go wilder, get ruder than in a poem. Their punk potential is enormous! To me, that is enough.” How can poets “go wild”? How would you “go wild” in a poem?

.

33_Traditionally, poetry has often been a way to voice dissent and be political. Would poems be more popular if states forbid and outlawed them?

.

34_If you had an urgent live-or-die message that had to reach many readers, would you sit down and write a poem? I can see how poetry is essential in regimes where no one can talk openly. But today? Here and now? Can’t we all be blunt? Write down what we really mean?

.

35_Where’s the fun in NOT being blunt?

.

36_How can poetry disrupt / object / challenge?

.

37_Are there people who pirate poems? Should poems be free? Are there copyright fights over poetry? I know that there are fierce legal battles over every word Karl Valentin ever published: His heirs and copyright holders sued many, many people. If you help spread Karl Valentin’s work, chances are good that you will be sued. (Rightly so?)

.

38_Are poems elitist? Are poems too complicated? Are poems like posh, sneaky parties in a room that takes 10 keys (and 20 years of education) to unlock? Does poetry get dissed because it’s not inclusive enough? IS poetry inclusive enough?

.

39_German readers can compare Ross Sutherland’s original poems to their German “Nachdichtungen”. Personally, I felt that the original poems sounded harsher, more abrupt or less sentimental than their German “Nachdichtungen”. Why? Because to Germans, English often sounds like the “edgier”, less sentimental language?

.

40_How does translation change a poem’s tone and atmosphere? As a poet, would you be okay with these tonal changes to your texts? As a reader, do you prefer all original versions to their German “Nachdichtung”?

.

41_Would you rather be talented enough to write excellent poems… or have the talent to understand other people’s poetry?

.

42_Imagine a magician that sells talent: What should be his price range for a „If I write poems, they will turn out great“ talent? Which other talents would be near that range? What would you sacrifice or invest to create great poetry yourself?

.

43_Few people have the money and the resources to finish a movie. Few people have the time and energy to finish a novel. A lot of people can try and write some poems: Why do most of them stop in their 20s?

.

44_A publisher friend once lamented that if all people who had written poems as teenagers would be buying new poems today, poetry would be mainstream. Do people love writing poems more than they love reading them?

.

45_How would you pick your own poem’s images and topics? Would you research? How? What do you think has been the kernel of most poetry: an idea? A feeling? An impulse? I feel like Ross Sutherland wants to amuse and surprise / astonish.

.

46_Do you think classic poems, the ones you read in school, were „more universal“, „aged better“?

.

47_On Amazon and rating sites like Goodreads, poetry collections get very high scores: People give more stars to nonfiction, experimental books, “difficult formats” than to novels. But if these “difficult formats” are so much fun – why is hardly anyone reading them? Is there prestige in posting high ratings for “difficult” books? Do you feel rewarded when you read “difficult” poems? If you told everyone in your life that you loved poetry: Who would react? How?

.

48_Imagine you could be known by every school kid for the next 100 years for one poem that will be taught everywhere: What would your poem be about?

.

49_What’s the best age to read Ross Sutherland’s poems? Does it help to be male? Does it help to be British? Does it help to be born in 1979, be white, know video games etc.? Do his poems have a target audience?

.

50_”Why is poetry seen as a problem child? You won’t get rich from dogwalking either – and still, no one says: ‘Dogs are so tricky! There’s something wrong with dogs.’” (Sabine Scho)

.

51_How can we be sure that Ross is a true, “professional” poet? What sets him apart from a hobby poet? Is that a valid distinction – is it important?

.

52_In an interview, Ross recommends the “big poetry clubs” of Great Britain. “Nights such as Book Slam, OneTaste and Homework in London, Hammer and Tongue in Brighton, Big Word in Edinburgh.” Do places like that exist in Germany? Where can you go to discover young poets? Is there a difference between “poet” and “poetry slam contestant”?

.

53_There is a lot of humor in Ross’ poems. I love that – because if you pay for comedy, you want to laugh. Throughout a comedic performance, you might ask: “Is this funny enough? Am I getting what I came for?”. Ross can afford to be more elegant, relaxed – because his humor comes as an extra, an unexpected bonus: It’s not the “main attraction”. Are Ross’ texts funny because it’s not their main goal to be funny?

.

54_What is their main goal? Do they achieve it?

.

55_Is this a question that should be asked? Can it be answered by readers?

.

56_I wish that lots of poetry had links and footnotes – like the ones Simone Kornappel used to complicate and remix Ross’ “Richard Branson” poem.

.

57_Poets might reply: “But poetry has links already! The title ‘Richard Branson’ makes you think of Richard Branson! Katharina Schultens’ ‘gorgos portofolio’ poems recall the gorgons of Greek myth. There are huge semi-hidden references in nearly every poem: Try to uncover these connections yourself! You want ‘hyperlink literature’? Poems are hyper-hyperlinked!”

.

58_My reservation here is that I can easily recognize a reference like “Zangief” because I grew up playing “Street Fighter II”. I have huge problems with a reference like “Hyperion” because I’m not a scholar of ancient Greece – or an upper-class school boy at a humanistic private school in Vienna, ca. 1880. What is the difference between poems named “Menelaus” and “Lindsay Lohan”? Can I love one – but feel bored and excluded by the other?

.

59_If Katharina Schultens wrote a “Gorgos Portfolio” NOVEL, I’d buy it. Because novels taught and reassured me that most background facts I’ll need to know in order to enjoy them are right there on the pages – like toys that come with batteries included. Poems often seem like reactions, comments, references and replies: meta-narration, second-degree writing, texts that needs other text, frustrating on its own. Beiträge zweiter Ordnung.

.

60_When I started reading Ross Sutherland’s poetry, I didn’t know about his goals or personal history, his self-image or the standards to which he holds his work. In my analysis, I approached his poems as carefully constructed, deliberately literary texts; delicate strings of words where every nuance matters. How else could poetry be approached? Are we more careful and nervous around poems? Are we too careful? Frightened?

.

61_I’m much less respectful with (…or intimidated by) songs: Once I hear music, I feel confident enough to say „These are smart lyrics. These are trite lyrics!“ To me, this comes easier because music brings so many extra layers of information – especially online: the instruments, the album artwork, musicians and their stage personae, the videos and live performances. I feel competent around songs. They are easy to scrutinize. Poems, on the other hand, often seem distant, hermetic, guarded, solipsistic or opaque. They make me turn away and shrug: “Why bother? Who am I to criticize?”

.

62_Do you want to know what Ross looks like? If he sleeps with men or with women? If he wins awards? Had a happy childhood? If he’s a not-very-rich poet – or a starving one? Does all this help you understand (and appreciate) his work?

.

63_Do you want to know Ross’ intentions? Each poem’s backstory and making-of? His insecurities, personal verdicts and the walkthroughs, user’s guides, interpretations and cheat codes he has been handing out to explain his work?

.

64_Should poems “work on their own” – or is that kind of extra information half the fun? Do you wish each poem came with a text about the author’s intentions? Or does that show that Ross’ poems are too meek to stand for themselves?

.

65_Why should poetry “stand for itself”? A lot of poets are excellent at writing about their work: Much better than most novelists (…or singers). I love reading poetry-related essays, analysis and discourse in places like Lyrikkritik.de or BELLA triste. In fact, I love these poetry essays much more than I love most poetry!

.

66_Compared to journalists and novelists, poets often seem more social, open, more professional and eager-to-network: They are doing performances and discussions, translations and curating work, they write essays and give workshops. Is it because they HAVE to – in order to make a living? Because a community as small as the poetry scene needs strong bonds and a carefully maintained system of give-and-take? Or is their work as poets giving them skills to branch out, connect, experiment, adapt?

.

67_Name five things you value in a poem. Here are mine:

1. ambivalence

2. ambition

3. emotion

4. curiosity

5. imagery that, for a while, won’t leave my head

.

68_Is it okay if they aren’t there? Some of them? All of them?

.

69_Can a poem be too short? Too long? Are two words a poem? One? To me, Ross’ “Experiment to determine the Existence of Love” felt too long – but more because it wasn’t strong / complex enough to hold my interest through all these stanzas.

.

70_Is there something a poem shouldn’t be? Didactic? Ignorant? Racist? Branded / commercial? Boring?

.

71_I can imagine a dangerous book, a dangerous movie. But I have trouble picturing a dangerous poem – besides ones that reproduce or make light of intolerance: propaganda, hateful or cruel slogans.

.

72_That being said: I feel like Ross’ poems are extremely harmless.

.

73_Music has rhythms. Paintings have color schemes. But modern poetry mostly did away with rhymes. Are rhymes too banal? Playful? Were they essential to poetry before? Until when? What is essential to today’s poetry?

.

74_What makes a text qualify as a poem?

.

75_Poetry collections are rather thin. Poems are rather short. Neither have to be: There are reasons that most feature films are long enough to warrant a trip to the cinema. That most paintings are smaller than a garage. That most albums take less than 80 minutes to play. But is there a reason that most poems fit on one or two pages?

.

76_I’d love to see poems use pictures, not words. But I guess that would be too… expensive? Hard to stage? Anyone all over the world can write „a sad, pale pink shirt on a frozen riverbank“. But it would take lots of resources to find the ideal shirt – and place it on the ideal riverbank. Still: If there are graphic novels – why aren’t there graphic poems? Sequential images, structured and layered like written poetry?

.

77_Because no matter how clear and simple a poet’s words – it’s hard to make people see the “correct” pale pink shirt: Is it frustrating to describe a shirt and have your readers picture 1000 different ones?

.

78_I lost a lot of faith in Ross-the-Poet when I saw his poetry films on Youtube: They seemed much simpler, flatter, easy to dismiss – like student projects finished in a rush because everyone involved wanted to go and play air hockey instead. Our standards are rising: It’s often excruciating to manage Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, to blog and be camera-ready and professional if you’re a single artist / freelancer. Still: Ross’ videos looked so haphazard and careless that I wondered how much care this same person invested in their poetry. (Is this a fair question, though? How many poets should we judge by their Youtube accounts?)

.

79_”The poems are the bricks, the performance is the mortar”, Ross writes about his career on stage: “Poetry comes alive for me in those situations. To see my poems dead on the page… they look a little lost.” Do you agree? How “dead” and “lost” are Ross’ poems?

.

80_What are we missing if we discuss Ross’ work as nothing but text? Imagine that someone stole Madonna’s song lyrics and posted them online, without any context or musical cues: If we talk about these words but stay ignorant about their performer, the stage, their delivery… how much can we really understand?

.

81_And what if I’m wrong: What if Ross Sutherland’s biggest goal IS the laughter? The applause? What if he writes poetry to make college-aged crowds in bars cheer and laugh? Would that still be “poetry”? Why wouldn’t it?

.

82_I expect poets to place each word with care (…but then: maybe I’m too conventional: it must be okay for poets to be rash, silly and careless, too!). Still – I love texts, essays, novels, translations, tweets by poets because they pick better, more thought- and colorful words than anyone else – and I wonder if this is becoming more important for many non-poets, too: How? Where? What can poets teach us?

.

83_All German children spend 9+ years in school. They have more than 9,000 hours of classes. How many of these classes should be about poetry? Poetry writing? Poetry history? Poetry analysis?

.

84_I don’t remember if, in 13 years of Deutschunterricht, we ever saw a poem by a non-German author. Even today, I could not name 5 to 10 French, Spanish or Italian poets. We had no Milton in school. No Dante. Plath, cummings, Dickinson and Blake only showed up in my A-Level English class / Englisch-LK.

.

85_Because poets know so well how to craft colorful, intelligent, suprising and precise sentences… what kind of jobs or university courses could profit from a poetry-writing class or workshop? Who could learn? And what? Teachers? Copywriters? Journalists? Anyone talking or writing?

.

86_Once I google „Why is poetry important“, I get these points and ideas:

language awareness

critical analysis

creativity and enthusiasm

and, in ALL German results: “to talk about the feelings that you can’t express otherwise”

.

87_You meet an interesting person. Now… you might want to take a portrait. Do an interview. Write a novel! Once you hear a song, you might want to sing your own version. I understand how people say: “I saw something. It challenged me – and made me want to create a play, a movie, a game, an essay, an intervention.” But what needs to happen to make a poet say: „Oh! I want to take this stimulus… and describe it in ambivalent language in an ambivalent way“…? Poems seems like a more indirect, long-winded, complicated way to react to the world than most other artistic responses.

.

88_Because despite all well-picked words, poetry often seeks ambivalence: Words can mean two or three exclusive things. There can be friction and frightening gaps. Where else is that kind of paradox, unclear language possible – and encouraged?

.

89_If there’s not one single correct interpretation to a poem… why bother interpreting at all? If anything can mean two or three different things… why go play detective? With most poems, we will never find out the murderer’s motif. Or the poet’s “intention”…

.

90_Fantasy literature is much more popular in rural areas: The German publisher of “Lord of the Rings” said that most of their fan mail came from remote German villages. If fantasy is a “country thing” – is science fiction a “city thing”? What about poetry: Are the classic poems (Nature! Romance! Weather!) more popular with rural people? Is modern poetry a “city thing” – colder, fractured and dense?

.

91_15 years ago, when German journalist Else Buschheuer started writing about her love for “Sex and the City”, a lot of horrible women approached her and cheered “Yes! I love that show, too! We have so much in common”. Buschheuer says that she has never felt “in worse company” than after she championed “Sex and the City”. Do you know someone who loves poetry? What are they like? Would you enjoy their company? Become “one of them”?

.

92_Do you think Ross Sutherland loves poetry? I studied Creative Writing – but many students around me didn’t love books and read very little. What they loved was being a writer. The heroism. The rebellion. The scrappy underdog allure.

.

93_I really don’t know anyone who LOVES poems the way many of my friends LOVE novels: Only publishers of poetry… who say that poetry is important. And many poets writing about their poetry friends. But everyone has skin in the game – and everyone seems more passionate about the “importance of poetry” than they are about actual, living poets: “poetry” is beloved. Actual, living poets, though? They are treated like rare birds. Or whales. You want them to survive. But you don’t want them to stay on your couch.

.

94_As a reader and literature critic, I often roll my eyes when I discuss publishing: like many readers and critics, I think that there are too many bad or overhyped books – while the good ones are hard to find. On pages like Lyrikzeitung.com, most poets sound equally exhausted about poetry – but while I feel that there is too much [overhyped fiction], most poets feel overlooked. Stefan: „Don’t we spend too much time talking about books that might not be worth that attention?” Poets: „Poetry needs more attention! Now!” I feel like most poets love „all of poetry“ while I definitely don’t love „all of literature“. My aim is selection. Their aim is… promotion? Protection? Survival?

[In German, “Selektion” is a phrase that has strong Nazi implications. If you’re a critic, please don’t talk about “Selektion”.]

.

95_How would this discussion, the whole perception of poetry, change if poems became popular again? If there was money for poets and publishers and more people interested in reading and listening to poetry? Would the poems change? Would the discussions change? Would happiness increase?

.

96_How can you support poetry? How can you help make poems more visible?

.

97_Many authors write down new and little-used words. What would happen if you kept a file and updated it for a full year? How would it change you? Would it be worth your time?

.

98_Why would Ross partake in the “comment”-project? Would you enjoy reading hundreds of comments, responses, critiques and conflicting ideas about your work?

.

99_I can imagine Ross saying „Wow. There were three German scholar guys [Kristoffer Cornils, Konstantin Ames and me: the Profileser] who immediately started googling shit like ‘School of Broken Necks’ like THAT was the most important aspect of my poetry.” I think that Ross would enjoy a more relaxed, less scholarly approach to his work. Any ideas?

.

100_Are poems inspiring? Movies and TV shows make me empathize with difficult characters. Video games inspire me to work hard – or explore. Novels inspire me to shape a story, connect the dots and focus on bigger pictures. Poems, if anything, inspire me to reflect the way I have been using words.

Because every one of these little fuckers… matters. So much.

[deutsche Nachdichtung: weiter unten]

 

I have helmed enough spaceships in my time

to understand a lounge in three dimensions.

 

My mind can pilot a lightweight craft

through the hazards of your mantelpiece. I can hide

 

in the nebula of your Grandmother’s curtains,

sky-dock on the lampshade. A Yorkie Easter egg crumbles

 

in my hands like the last words of the Death Star.

Burner of a billion ships, I hold my head high

 

under the glittering skies of French campsites,

return to find my parents playing dominos by lamplight,

 

reconstructing the car dashboard, over and over,

all of us in preparation for some great crash yet to come:
the one I pray for every time we drive to Dixons,

the car whipping round, my body falling out the door,

 

like, laters! Head slipping across the intersection

like a foamy beer thrown along a bar. I used to watch

 

those bartenders and think that they were fakers.

But now I have watched the out-takes and

 

OK I finally get it.
 
© Ross Sutherland


 

Ewige Leben (noch und noch und nochmal versuchen)

Ich habe zu meiner Zeit genug Raumschiffe gesteuert,

um eine Lounge dreidimensional zu erfassen.

 

Mit bloßer Gedankenkraft kann ich ein leichtes Fahrzeug

durch die Unbilden deiner Kaminverkleidung pilotieren. Kann mich

 

in den Nebeln der Vorhänge deiner Großmutter verstecken,

der Hafen in den Wolken ist der Lampenschirm. Ein Yorkie-Osterei zerbröselt

 

in meinen Händen genauso wie die letzte Meldung des Todessterns.

Ich, Brenner von Milliarden Schiffen, recke stolz mein Haupt

 

unter den gleißenden Himmeln französischer Campingplätze,

kehre zurück, um meine Eltern beim Dominospiel bei Lampenlicht anzutreffen,

 

Umbau, immer und immer wieder, des PkW-Armaturenbretts,

wir alle waren irgendeines echten Unfalls, der unmittelbar bevorstand, gewärtig:

 

Desjenigen, um den ich immer inständig bitte, wenn wir zu Dixonsfahren,

das Auto rast, mein Körper fliegt durch die Tür,

 

oder so, bis dann! Kopf segelt die Kreuzung entlang,

wie ein schaumiges Bier, das eine Theke entlang geschubst wird. Früher

 

schaute ich solchen Kneipiers zu und denke, dass sie Simulanten waren.  

Aber ich hab nun die herausgeschnittenen Sequenzen gesehen und

 

OK, endlich hab ich’s raus.


© Deutsche Nachdichtung: Konstantin Ames

© Edward Burtynsky
© Edward Burtynsky

© Edward Burtynsky

und irgendwann ist mir passiert, was mir meistens passiert, wie man vielleicht bemerken kann, ich schweife ab so dann und wann, und denke über etwas ganz anderes nach. über mein eigenes lesen zum beispiel. ich lese parasitär. weil ich immer schon mitschreibe, aus angst, dass ich nicht mehr kommuniziere, glaube ich. ich sehe ob ich mich einklinken kann in eine sprache, eine sicht, eine welt, einen ort, vor allem wahrscheinlich in die sprache, und wenn, dann beute ich diese sprache aus, gnadenlos, ich glaube aus einer ikonoklastischen überzeugung heraus, um mich vor dieser sprache irgendwie zu schützen, um sie zu entwerten auch, das ist ein recht gewaltvoller vorgang stelle ich gerade fest.

 

ikonoklasmus der sprache – kein auslöschen, verbrennen, durchstreichen eher eine imitation einer sprache. sie von ihrem hohen ton herabreißen. sie dadurch verspotten. sie noch viel lauter sprechen lassen.

 

Au moindre saxophone, le grand déguisement.

ich fange an in dieser sprache zu denken und in dieser sprache dann auch eine weile zu schreiben, es ist wie ein rhythmus, der sich über alles drüberlegt, wie ein lieblingsalbum, das man ein jahr lang rauf und runter und dann gehts plötzlich nicht mehr und man weiß gar nicht, ich weiß gar nicht, warum, bis ich etwas anderes zu lesen bekomme und dann die sprache wechsle, andere klangfarben schätze, bis ich sie nicht mehr aushalte, und weil ich recht viel gleichzeitig lese meistens und sachen auch oft nicht zu ende, wodurch ich dann nie wirklich verstehe, worauf eine sprache hinausläuft, vermischen sich die sprachen oft recht wirr und ich versuche dann eher zu vermitteln zwischen ihnen, zwischen den verschiedenen kontinenten dieser unzähligen sprachen. und überlege mir dann immer, wer da jetzt eigentlich genau, also welcher ton, welches instrument, welche geschichte, welche färbung, welcher hintergrund, welche melodie und wie man das mit dem übrigen ensemble zusammenpacken kann.

ich lese tram 83 mittlerweile auf französisch

wie ein beatnik gedicht

Il avait suffisamment
analysé la gamine
et l’avait même
imaginée
sur son grabat
malgré la pénombre.
Il l’attira contre son corps,
demanda son nom,
«appelle-moi Requiem»,
promena ses doigts
sur les mamelles
de la jeune créature,
une autre phrase:

«Tes cuisses, la prestance
d’une bouteille
de vodka …» avant de disparaître
dans la masse,
visqueuse,
glauque,
gluante,
lugubre…

Il fallait
une
consigne. Indiquer
un
lieu où ils pourraient causer à tête reposée.
La jeune femme insistant,
il soupira,
se mordit les
lèvres et balbutia:
«Rendez-vous au Tram 83».

unter uns: ich kann kaum französisch. trotzdem lese ich das französische original und versuche zu entziffern, was da gesagt wird.

ich lese einfach drüber weg, viel zu schnell und verstehe ein paar einzelne bruchstücke und und tue dann so als bräuchte ich nicht mehr:

La même légende, comme xx xxxx ne xxxxxxxx pas, prétendait que la construction xx xxxxxx xx xxx avait fait de xxxxxxx morts xxxxxxx aux maladies tropicales, aux xxxxxx techniques, aux xxxxxxxx conditions de travail xxxxxxx par l’administration coloniale, bref, on connaît le scénario.

manchmal verstehe ich alles, ohne zu wissen was da steht:

Nuit de la débauche, nuit de la beuverie, nuit de la mendicité, nuit de l’éjaculation précoce, nuit de la syphilis et autres maladies sexuellement transmissibles, nuit de la prostitution, nuit de la débrouille, nuit de la danse et de la danse, nuit qui engendre des choses qui n’existent qu’entre un excès de bière et l’intention de vider sa poche qui exhale les minerais de sang, cette bouse juchée au rang des matières premières, au commencement était la pierre…

© Bluegrass Dive Club

© Bluegrass Dive Club

ständig ändert sich die zeit

beim lesen bin ich mir sicher, wir befinden uns in den fünfziger/sechziger jahren, kurz vor dem vermeintlichen ende des kolonialistischen zeitalters. schon nach dem ersten absatz bin ich mir sicher, ich bin nicht unter seemännern aber irgendwie in küstennähe, bei jean genet, ich bin kurz vor dem wechel zur postkolonialisierung, als die öffentliche haltung endlich umschlug und ein bewusstsein der ungerechtigkeit einsetzte. ich bin bei einer erschöpften, missbrauchten, ausgebeuteten natur, die nichts mehr hergibt und immer noch beackert wird. linien laufen ineinander zwischen beat poesie, ausbeutung, klimawandel und kolonialisierung und mir gefällt die darstellung von frauen nicht, das wollte ich gesagt haben, aber ich denke mir, das muss so sein, du hast sicher wieder etwas übersehen, da, schau einmal genau hin, du schaust in diese welt hinein nur durch einen menschen, der selbst überfordert ist, von zeit, raum und ort und seine überforderung versuchst du wieder runterzubrechen auf deine fiktion einer geregelten wahrnehmung, die du immer nur abends, zur post-bürgerlichen stunde im blauen flimmern am rechner zustandebringst, also irgendwie, glaube ich, dass ich mich wieder geirrt habe, wie ich immer vermute, beim lesen, dass ich mich irgendwo geirrt habe, irgendetwas überlesen habe, ich habe wieder nicht aufgepasst und irgendwas vergessen, wieder nicht genau genug gelesen, das wurde mir immer schon erklärt, dass ich recht schlampig lese, hieß es immer, ich lese schlampig, ich wusste nie so genau was das heißt, als kind hatte ich dann immer das gefühl, oder dann später auch immer noch als jugendlicher, wenn sich immer alles ändert, ständig ändert sich die zeit, auf jeden fall hatte ich immer das gefühl, dass ich schmutzig sei, weil ich schlampig lese, dass meine hände schlampig umblättern, ich habe irgendwie versucht zu verstehen, was schlampig lesen heißen kann, irgendwer wird mir gleich sagen, dass ich etwas übersehen habe, aber da steht doch, oder hier heißt es doch, und ich werde dann nachgegeben haben und werde die verknüpfung trotzdem gemacht haben.

ständig ändert sich der ort

eine klippe, die tram 83 ist nicht größer als ein tramwagen der wiener linien, aber darin spielen eine große jazz band, es tanzen mindestens hundert menschen, die bar alleine sprengt schon den tramwagen, es ist außerdem ein diner, aber ein fake, einer, der in frankreich steht, der an einer nebligen klippe mitten in zentralafrika steht, kein meer weit und breit aber eine klippe und viel nebel und ein wald und sonst ist da eigentlich nicht viel. es ist dunkel und ich bin mir sicher, dass ich wieder irgendwas vergessen habe, dass ich wieder irgendwas übersehen habe, ich gehe noch einmal zurück, nous marchions dans les ténèbres de l’histoire, sicher habe ich wieder irgendwas übersehen, irgendeinen hinweis, les jazzmen se retirèrent sur un morceau de Gillespie, A Night in Tunisia, irgendwo, ich gehe über die bar nochmal, höre nochmal genau hin, lasse mir noch einmal alles erzählen, ici, le Nouveau-Mexique, chacun pour soi, la merde pour tous, ich mache die tür der tram 83 auf und zu, quietscht sie? ist es eine einflügelige tür, zu einem wohnwagen, sieht jetzt von hier aus alles aus wie in einem david lynch film, blue velvet, hat die tür ein bulls eye? ist es eine metallene tür? ich sehe immer ein bulls eye, wenn ich tram 83 sage, dann nocheinmal das verbotsschild, nocheinmal die gespräche, die prostituierten im rentenalter, die pfingstkirchenpfarrer, die nachtklubärzte, die liebhaber von pornofilmen, un couple authentique, postcolonial, s’assit à côté d’eux, nocheinmal die hühnerhofphiliosophen, die organhändler, die soldaten-witwen, die siamesischen zwillinge schaue ich mir zweimal an, die wegelagerer, die aufständischen dissidenten, die altwarenhändler, die erzschürfer, die druiden oder schamanen, noch einmal die soldaten ohne gelegenheit zu vergewaltigen, noch einmal die gewohnheitstrinker und die minenarbeiter, die milizionäre und die marabus, noch einmal lasse ich sie zu wort kommen, weil ich mich verlaufen habe, ich dachte wir seien ganz woanders, in einer ganz anderen zeit, Monsieur est Belge?

© thomas köck

index

Ich hatte auf neue autopoetische Funktionen von Karen Suender gewartet! Nun sind sie in herbstlich korrektem Fond erschienen und pusten zur Imitation auf: gebe ich ‘Paprika Armada’ bei google-Images ein, bahnt sich eine Flotte Papierschiffe ihre hölzerne Bahn -  und spült mich doch zurück zu jenem papiernen  Schiff, das sich im September im ersten Eindruck der Gedichte Prigents auf die Wasser eines tiefblauen trompe-l’œil begab.

Die papiernen Schiffe  erbringen aber auch  die message, dass demnächst noch Fracht aus outre-mer kommt: Die Interpretationen einiger Gedichte Prigents  durch Mayra Santos-Febres (Puerto Rico) und James Noël (Haiti) werden gerade ediert!

Did you ever happen to be in a football stadium? And if so, have you experienced that distinctive feeling of everybody in that arena supporting their team? During the World Cup this year, we were ones again brought a little closer to that feeling of patriotism, of belonging all together in a sense.
But, let’s stick to the facts, apart from events like the WC, the Olympic Games or others which are connected to sports mainly, patriotism isn’t that spread in Germany. But why?
When we speak in terms of globalization, one thinks of the gathering of countless different races in one country for example. This means that there are many different individuals and many different cultures. Isn’t it wonderful that, especially during big sporting events, all those individuals are united by patriotism? Even if it is not their fatherland, which they support, at least they support the country they live in.
This so-called “party-patriotism“ is very dangerous. We would like to give a current example of this years world cup in Brazil. During the game between Germany and Ghana, when Germany was one behind, some supporters of the German national team published racist comments on social networks. Probably these people aren’t racist at all, but under this special atmosphere, they could not accept seeing their team lose.
In our opinion this example clearly shows how easy one can be attracted to become closed, hostile or even aggressive towards other countries. As a consequence you can say that there is only a thin line between PATRIOTISM and NATIONALISM.

Actually Germans do have some things to be proud of, some of the world’s greatest minds, like Goethe, Schiller, Lessing, Tucholsky, Luther, Beethoven, Bach, Willy Brandt and many others are of German origin.
Yet, in the first and second world war, Germany, driven by nationalism, wanted to conquer the rest of Europe and committed crimes way beyond our imagination, like the Holocaust.
Especially the second world war, which Germany lost, lead to a total loos of reputation in the European community (which actually of course didn’t exist yet, but however was present in a way amongst the allied forces). Germany had to surrender on the 8th of May 1945.
Ever since that day, it is has become impossible to love our country and to be proud of it’s achievements and it’s past. Although some people say that the peaceful revolution of 1989/1990 in eastern Germany and eventually the resulting fall of the Berlin Wall again gave us a reason to be proud, we disagree with them. Not wanting to doubt the bravery and compassion the people had to tare down the endless seeming barriers between our world and their world, you have to see that these events couldn’t have happened if Hitler and the Nazis weren’t there and they hadn’t lost the war. It is impossible to ignore certain elements of history just because something astonishing happened a few years later on that base. We’re of the opinion that history can only be seen as one thing, one complex structure that is connected in so many endless ways. That makes it very difficult to be patriotic, because every country has it’s dark periods.
We think patriotism is behind the times. We’re living through the greatest age of global inter-racial, inter-ethnic understanding, which is known as globalization. We all live in one world and yet we seem to be separated invisible borders that only exist on maps.
But people rather tend to not understand this. If they had understood it, would there still be wars going on all across the globe? We doubt it. Admittedly we don’t understand this ourselves, although we’ve just written it down.

 

Christopher Peter and Joris van Uffelen

Hildegard-Wegscheider-Gymnasium, Berlin







walton ford_the sensorium

 

Ich mag ja diesen Text. Er ist wunderbar grotesk. Wie sollte man auch oft anders zum Rechtssystem stehen. Der in diesem Text Angeklagten scheint den Prozess der ihm hier gemacht wird als eine Art Scharade zu empfinden. Das Urteil über ihn wird seiner Ansicht nach lediglich durch die Müdigkeit der Geschworenen gefällt. Dabei wirkt es grotesk, dass der Angeklagte nicht mit ihrem Sprecher tauschen möchte, welcher die unangenehme Aufgabe hat, das Urteil über ihn verkünden zu müssen, muss er doch mit lebenslänglich rechnen. Während der Sprecher bei der Verkündigung mit sich ringen muss – ihm der Schreck im Gesicht steht – lässt sich keine emotionale Regung bei dem Angeklagten feststellen, auch nicht durch die Gewissheit dass bereits hinter verschlossenen Türen über sein Schicksal entschieden wurde.Während er vom gesamten Gerichtssaal beobachtet wird, scheint er doch nicht der Protagonist, sondern der eigentliche Beobachter zu sein. Ist es doch meist die einzige Fluchtmöglichkeit, selbst zum Beobachter zu werden, wenn alle Augenpaare auf dich gerichtet sind. Auf diese Weise verschafft man sich die Distanz um sein Überleben zu sichern oder sich schlichtweg nur nicht angesprochen zu fühlen. Unbeteiligte Betrachter haben auch vor Gericht das Recht zu schweigen, weiter zu beobachten, zu observieren um sich im äußersten Fall ihre Meinung im Stillen zu bilden, falls sie denn dem Drang einer Positionierung nachgeben wollen.

Tocotronic – Aus meiner Festung

 

- Um hier noch den Pflichtanteil literarischer Allgemeinbildung mit herein zu bringen: Na, woher kennen wir denn so absurde Gerichtsverhandlungen? Ja, richtig: Kafka. Der Prozess. – Hat ja jeder schon einmal gelesen, weil muss ja. Ansonsten kann man auch einfach so tun. Das war auch so ein groteskes Ding: “»Richtiges Auffassen einer Sache und Mißverstehn der gleichen Sache schließen einander nicht vollständig aus.«” (Habe ich natürlich aus Wikiquote kopiert.)

 

….Ich sah Rosetten von Gehirn auf den Gehsteig spritzen. Die Straße quasi Kathedrale. Die großen Orgeln gingen los.

 

Als Leser möchte man dem Angeklagten noch nichts anhängen. Böser Wille und keiner zur Kooperation? Hm, keine Ahnung, weiß ich doch nicht. Die Fakten die hier aufgezählt werden, sind aber wunderbar bildlich und so voller Stimmung. Sollte ich diese Straftat allein nach diesen Fakten beurteilen, würde ich wahrscheinlich sagen, dass ich mir das so ganz gut vorstellen kann, so stimmungs- und bildmäßig. Wie Arthouse-Splatter – falls dieses Genre überhaupt existiert? Ich habe gegoogelt. Sowas wie “blood+cathedral”. Ich habe das hier gefunden, so eine Art Gaming-Version:

 

blood_knights_screenshot_signature_lift_draw_blood_cathedral

Blood Knights is an Action RPG following the “age-old conflict between vampires and humans” as it escalates into open war. It combines spectacular battles with RPG elements – in single player or co-op.

Und auf der gleichen Seite wo es anscheinend um Underground-Gaming geht, habe ich auch weiteren nützlichen Input gefunden. Diesmal zum Thema “Blood splatter”. Könnte ja noch hilfreich sein:

The spatter of blood appears in video games for a number of reasons. It could be the aftermath of a bloody shootout between terrorist and a SWAT unit or the result of a devastating uppercut in a championship boxing match.

 

Genug davon, aber als Kunsthistoriker feiert man ja solche Stellen besonders derbe ab. Im Großen und Ganzen war das Morden also ein Fest fürs Auge. Was da gefeiert wurde, würde ich gern wissen, aber  das erliest man sich vielleicht noch im Folgenden. Der Begriff “Rosette” stammt übrigens aus dem Lateinisch-Französischem und bezeichnet ein rundes Ornament in Blütenform. Und eine “Kathedrale” bezeichnet eine Bischofskirche. Glaubt man jedoch Peter Sarstedt, kann man den Begriff Kathedrale aber auch in die Sprachwelt der eigenen Befindlichkeiten integrieren:

Soundtrack gibts auch:

Peter Sarstedt – I am a cathedral 

 

I am balanced well, you see,
I am a Cathedral locked in stain glass windows,
I am a Cathedral dimly lit.

 

 

….. weiter in der Assoziationskette:

Verrückt sind nur die anderen. Ihr Urteilsvermögen ist ausgeschaltet. Ist der Sprecher der Geschworenen mehr Opfer des Urteils – so ist der Anwalt der das Verrücktsein des Angeklagten bestätigt, das Ausgeschaltetsein dessen Urteilsvermögens, der Ausgeschaltete. Auch der Sachverständige wird vom Angeklagten kaum für Voll genommen. Wie absurd.

….

Der Verurteilte berichtet gegen Ende des Textes über den Komfort der Betten, die ihm zugewiesen wurden. Die Gesellschaft entscheidet per Gerichtsbeschluss über Bett und Schlafqualität. Wie man sich bettet oder die anderen dich betten, so ruhst du also auch – so heißt es ja auch schon seit Urzeiten. Einem verurteilten Mörder wird ein anderes Bett zugewiesen als einem Unzurechnungsfähigen. Die Unbescholtenen schlafen ja auch angeblich einen besseren Schlaf als die mit Dreck am Stecken. Da das Rechtssystem unberechenbar ist und vielleicht auch seinen Spaß daran hat, darf der Mensch auch gern mal das Bett wechseln, falls er denn nicht schon von selbst auf die Idee gekommen ist.

 

 

Hello this is Ross Sutherland, the author of Jean Claude Van Damme. I’m here to talk a little more about it.

It’s quite satisfying writing these notes! I’m enjoying it a lot. Usually, if I was performing these poems onstage, I would give an introduction that would cover quite a lot of this information.

Agh, but maybe that means that the poems themselves are incomplete! If you need notes to enjoy it, then that looks like a failure of the poem itself! The poem should have found a way to *include* the notes!

This is extremely difficult. Because writing poems is only part of the craft. The poems are the bricks, the performance is the mortar. Whenever I am thinking about poems, I’m thinking about them as part of a live performance, which comes with notes, asides, anecdotes, etc. Poetry comes alive for me in those situations.  To see my poems dead on the page… they look a little lost.

I wrote JCVD when I was a teenager. Maybe 16 or 17 years old. That was just a first draft, and I have reworked this poem many many times over! But the end has always been exactly the same. I knew what I wanted to say. I wanted to write a poem that helped me apologise to my dad.

I used to demonise my dad. Things happened in our family and I held him responsible. I made him the villain. When I discovered that my dad was taking drugs, I wanted to lay every blame at his feet. It took time to forgive him, to realise that every parent is human. We all make mistakes.

I wanted to write about this in poetry, but didn’t feel comfortable telling such a personal story onstage. In fact, I’ve never been comfortable talking about myself in my art. My new theatre show, Standby For Tape-Back-Up, is the first time I’ve really ever talked about myself honestly and personally onstage. And even then, I’m STILL using a cypher of pop culture. It’s a security blanket, I guess. It’s also a way to lower people’s guard- to discover a mutual safe territory, before attempting to poke beneath the surface.

I remember when Raul Julia died. His last acting role was as the villain M Bison in Street Fighter the Movie (it’s a terrible film). I found myself wondering what it was like to be Raul Julia’s child. I imagined a shelf, containing all of his father’s films, including Street Fighter The Movie at the end. In Julia’s last onscreen minute, he gets kicked into a wall of televisions by Jean Claude Van Damme (who chirps, “you’re off the air- permanently”). How could Raul Julia’s child bear to watch such a moment?

Over time, these two stories merged: Raul Julia as M Bison as my father. This was my inroad into discussing my own life. How father/son relationships can become a pantomime. How we learn to forgive those that seem unforgiveable. How real life and fiction are intertwined, and how we can use this to find solace.

Re: the poem’s title. Why call it Jean Claude Van Damme?  What does Van Damme symbolise in this extended metaphor? It’s not me fighting my dad, that’s for sure. I’m just watching the action on TV. Van Damme is the unstoppable force that’s coming for all of us. He’s the reason we have to make our amends before it’s too late.

I rewrote this poem over and over again, until finally publishing it in 2009 in my first collection. It’s probably the oldest poem in the book, and again, it’s another key to understanding all the writing I’ve done since. I use pop culture as a mechanism to deal with the most upsetting parts of my life. But pop culture is nothing more than a set of rules that we all know- a structure upon which to pitch our own ideas. Take away our shared language of culture and these notes would get way way longer.

Stefan Mesch had made some comments about my writing being kitsch, and I don’t have any problems with that term really. I really can’t respond any further because the article is in german and I’m reading it through Google Translate! Happy to talk about this more if it arises.

Sometimes this use of pop culture can make my poems feel childish. But then again, poetry is a very childish thing for me – it’s a place to experiment, to break rules and make others, to play games, to act without fear of judgement. When I forget that childishness, writing becomes impossibly hard.

Any thoughts you have on the poem, please add them below and I’ll try to respond. When it comes to poetry, I’m not much of an academic, but I’ll try my best! Art is a conversation, above all. Even if you didn’t like it, tell me why you didn’t like it, and I’ll try to respond.

Hello! This is Ross Sutherland. I’m going to talk about my poem Infinite Lives. I thought I’d tell you the story of how and why I wrote it.

The poem was written in 2012 (published in my collection ‘Emergency Window’). It was inspired by this sentence:

“A poem tries to escape it’s own subject matter”

I don’t know who said it originally. I heard it from the poet Billy Collins.  We start off on line one of the poem, in one place. Then, by the end of the poem, we’ve moved somewhere else entirely. When the poet sat down and wrote that first line, they had no idea where they were going to end up! I like this description of poetry. It really speaks to the me personally and helps explain the reason that I write. I want the poem to surprise me- to move me somewhere I wasn’t expecting. Writing a poem is a voyage of discovery (I know that sounds cheesy). You just go on your nerve.

I often find myself standing in front of classrooms yelling, “Poets are fakers! They want to pretend that they have all the answers, but they don’t! They’re making it up as they go along!”

I wanted to give an exercise to my students to explain this process. Here’s what I said to them:

“Find a memory. Go deep into your past and find something. It can be anything. Write down all you can remember. Keep describing that memory, until you find an object *inside* that memory that makes you think of *another* memory. As soon as you think of that object, transport yourself through time to that new memory – now repeat the process! Repeat again and again, creating a chain of memories that has you jumping back and forth through your lifespan.”

Through this process, time becomes fluid- we’re jumping through time based on the tiniest things: the smell of petrol, the sound of a klaxon, a dog bite, etc, etc.

I tried out this exercise myself. Here’s my notes:

 

I remember the first time I watched Star Wars. (1980) It was on TV. I was at a friend’s house. It was Easter. I remember eating a Yorkie egg and the burning remains of the Death Star. Those two images are connected in my head- easter eggs and a burning spaceship!

Which reminds me of playing space invaders. (1983) I loved the video arcade so much that I would play it in my head, even when there was no one else around. I remember hallucinating Space Invaders on the wall of my grandma’s lounge. On holiday (usually a campsite in France), I would spend all my money on the arcades, then go back to the tent to play dominos with my family.

Which reminds me of the rough edge of the dominos. Another strong memory from childhood. I associate that texture so powerfully with my family. We never felt more of a single unit than when we were playing dominos. 

Which reminds me of the dashboard of the family car: same texture as a domino. But this is a much later memory (1996). By this time, I am 15, working as a salesman for Dixons- an electrical retailers. My job involved selling kettles and toasters to old ladies. I used to rest my head against the dashboard when my Dad drove me to work on a Sunday morning. I used to have fantasies about the car crashing. I would try to steer the car off the road with my mind, similar to how I used to play space invaders in my head. This was the start of a difficult period of my life – I would find myself imagining my death almost constantly. It became an unhealthy obsession.

Which reminds me of an actual car crash I was in, two years later. (1998)No one was injured. But I’ve never been a good passenger ever since. I fell out the door of a car that was going about 25/30 miles an hour. My body hit the pavement and slid down the road until it hit a postbox…

Which reminds me of that bit in Westerns, when the bartender throws a beer along the edge of bar. You know? The beer slides perfectly along the whole length of the bar and into the waiting hand of the thirsty cowboy. I watched those films when I was little, and I thought the trick was was done with special effects. Years later, I watched a Western on DVD – one of the extras on the DVD was a compilation of glasses smashing – all the times that the barman messed up the trick. I finally understood how it worked – all the mistakes are hidden from the viewer. We just see the one perfect take. 

***

Having finished this exercise, I looked back over the material I’d collected. I’d started with a memory of Easter, age 4, and ended up in the DVD extras of a Western. In that sense, I’d fulfilled the brief. I’d been drawn by my subconscious- I’d escaped my own subject matter.

However, there was definitely a theme going through my journey. Almost every memory had focussed on “crashes” – most of these crashes were simulated crashes- playing videogames in my head, the deathstar exploding, fantasising about my car crashing, etc. I was surprised to discover this. It had not been my intention to talk about this. This was a present day anxiety finding its way into my work.

I think about death a lot. I’m one of those people that constantly asks themselves, “what if?” What if I stepped off this train platform / high ledge / etc. I don’t feel suicidal. I’m just running simulations. But this behaviour seems to be troubling me on a subconscious level. The poem was telling me this.

This is why the final part of the poem becomes so important. The “OK I finally get it” moment is a memory of me (as a child) realising how cinema is made! We hide the bad takes, we only show the good. And this is perhaps a lesson I can take into my own life. We all have negative thoughts. We all simulate bad things in our heads. And all these simulations are like out-takes from a film- we needed to work through them to get to the “good” take. We try try try again, until we get it right.

I suppose this poem was my way of saying to myself, “Ross, if you think you’re crazy. You’re not alone.”

…And it’s hardly an original idea. Quite boring really. But it was a necessary thing for me to write and go through.

Confession time- I think this poem was damaged a bit in the edit. I worked with my editor at Penned in the Margins, on editing the poem down to the final version. It was a much longer piece that we condensed down. Together, we blurred the edges of each memory, made the poem feel more dream-like. The idea was to recreate the way that humans connect memories in  their head- synapses move fast, the connections come and go quickly. However, I think that the poem loses some of it’s sense in the process.

I really agree with this comment from Kristoffer Cornils:

“I don’t like to consider those two concepts – »reality« and »virtuality« – as opposed entities, but rather as complementary to each other, if not completely indistinguishable.”

It pains me that this did not come through in the poem. Cornils hits upon the point that is just beyond the reach of the poem. It’s an idea that I was striving towards, but the poem ends too soon. Fantasy and memory intertwine- we cannot separate one from the other, and our worldview is built from their synthesis.

 I would like to comment on Stefan Mesch’s reading, but I can only read it though Google Translate, which is pretty hard! (If there is a version in English, please post it below and I’ll add some comments).

It’s clear Mesch didn’t like it but it’s hard to respond further. Reading Mesch’s criticism through GT is a bit like hearing your neighbours insulting you through the wall. You find yourself straining extra hard to hear it, but all you can gather is a feeling!

Ah, in that sense. It’s a bit like reading poetry.

Anyway, whether you liked it or hated it, I’m happy to respond in the comments below :)

erwiderung

Auf Konstantin Ames Vorrede zu irgendwas antwortet Stefan Mesch auf Facebook.

c kristoffer cornils

c kristoffer cornils

_

As a so called digital native, I grew up discussing a lot. Ever since I’ve first went online with a dial-up modem to chat with strangers on AOL, I’ve enjoyed being able to have a dialogue with like-minded people at any time I wanted to. Over the time the net has changed. After AOL lost its appeal, I signed up to message boards, then social networks. My attitude changed, too. I don’t go on the internet anymore hoping to find people with whom I agree. A dialogue with people who think just like you is fruitless, isn’t it?

_

I write a lot of reviews and articles on music and literature. Naturally, people often disagree with me and verbalise their disagreement in various ways. I like that. I don’t want to be that person who tells you what to think – I just want to throw my opinion in the ring, contribute to a greater discourse. Provide one voice where there are many others, thus expanding my horizons through other people’s perspectives.

_

Hence ¿Comment! seemed like the perfect project to me. Not only was I able to work with more than just words, but also pictures, music, etc., but I would automatically enter a dialogue of sorts. With Ross Sutherland’s poetry, the commentary provided by Stefan Mesch and Ross’s translator, Konstantin Ames, and on top of that everyone else assigned to or interested in joining the discussion on this blog or other social media like Facebook.

_

There remained one problem, though: As great as it is to have a multilingual – German, English, French – dialogue, a lot of that gets lost in translation. Ross even reached out to me on Twitter asking if I could clarify some of the points I made because Google Translate couldn’t make much sense of it. Which is probably my fault because I like to toy around with words too much, thus making any attempt to auto-translate my writings a futile task. When Katharina Deloglu asked me to provide a brief summary of my short essays on Ross’s poems, it made a lot of sense to me. After all, he should be able to join the dialogue just like everyone else, shouldn’t he?

_

Having said all this, it should be obvious why I started out with Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again). In my essay, I reflect upon my own childhood, how it was shaped by the various media (comics, books, TV, video games) I consumed growing up and how they changed my perception of reality or, to be more precise, the concept of reality. Ross and I were born only a few years apart, but it seems to me like the differences in our perception of what is real and virtual are quite different. I don’t like to consider those two concepts – »reality« and »virtuality« – as opposed entities, but rather as complementary to each other, if not completely indistinguishable. I mean, just take a look at your smartwatch: It is 2014, isn’t it? However, the last lines of Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again) make me think that Ross tries to warn us of the »real-life« ramifications of looking at things through the lense of »virtuality«. It actually reminded me of those times when my mum scolded me for reading too much or watching TV endlessly instead of going outside to play, i.e. spend time in the »real world«. To me, that seemed rather conservative.

_

Recommended listening/watching:

_

_

Choosing Zangief  next made perfect sense to me. Again I was able to put the »me« in »media«: I spend Chtulu knows how many days of my childhood years mashing the buttons of an SNES joypad. I usually lost. Partly due to the lack of any actual skills and maybe because I preferred the female characters in Street Fight. They are by default weaker than the dudes you could choose from. Thus, I took the opportunity to connect Ross’s decision with an ongoing debate in the gaming community, linking it to the latent sexism in the game industry and how those games perpetuate sexist stereotypes. My idea was that, while Ross’s poem is neither sexist nor deals directly with sexism, his choice of character – a visibly potent, powerful and hypermasculine male – indirectly contributes to that perpetuation of stereotypes. I then tried to deconstruct the myth of the alpha male as depicted by the game by pointing out its homoerotic implications. In Zangief, the Russian street fighter battles a bear – »bear« is conincidentally a term used by the gay community to describe homosexual men who pretty much look exactly like Zangief. That was a freebie.

_

The bear, however, has yet another connotation: It’s a symbol for Russia – which is where Zangief comes from according to the game manual provided by Nintendo. Street Fighter is not only inherently sexist, but also incredibly racist. Ross’s poem seemed like a perfect satire of this, because it takes all the stereotypes so far that they ultimately seem utterly absurd. Job well done, I thought. Until I started thinking about its political implications in the particular (geo-)political situation we are experiencing right now. When covering the current crisis in Ukraine, the media and people on the internet make use of a lot of stereotypes – both negative and positive – to describe and depict Russia. Point in case: It took me about five seconds to find a photoshopped image of Vladimir Putin riding a bear. Go figure. In the end, that gives Ross’s poem even more power. However, it’s an ambiguous kind of power: Is Ross providing a tongue-in-cheek critique on the way Russia is portrayed – or does he himself contribute to that by perpetuating those stereotypes?

_

Disclaimer: I have since learned that Zangief is actually part of a cycle of poems, each one devoted to another character from the Street Fighter universe. Yes, that includes the female ones. Thus my criticism is partly, if not completely invalid. It is also worth noting that Ross wrote the poem long before the ongoing debate about sexism in games (although the topic itself isn’t exactly brand new) or the conflict involving Russia and Ukraine (although Putin’s rise to even more power also can’t be considered a novelty). My decision to connect the text to those two issues regardless of the time difference between it was written and where in we are now is based on my belief that any piece of art from any time in history can and should be applied to any other time in history.

_

Recommended watching:

_

_

The idea that forms the foundation of A Second Opinion, i.e. taking a metaphor way too literally, has always been a common trope in literature. I used some examples, notably Heiner Müller’s aptly titled Herzstück (Heart Piece), to locate Ross’s poem in this particular tradition. Obviously, it pales in comparision to the dry humour of Müller. But that’s besides the point. A Second Opinion is yet another literary discussion of how words, i.e. what literature is made of, can fail (us). It touches on the eternal paradox of literature as a form of communication (and of course communication itself, as it is always also literary as it heavily relies on metaphors, metonymies, etc.) that somehow provides a meaning by simultaneously concealing it. Bottom line: Language is tricky as hell and if you throw love into the ring, too, things will inevitably (that word will have a comeback later in similar context) lead to communicative and emotional chaos.

_

Recommended watching:

_

_

With my essay on Jean-Claude van Damme, I took another chance to dive into my childhood memories. JCvD used to adorn the cover of a magazine I used to read when I was aged seven or eight. Limit was aimed at young boys like me, offering a glimpse in the world of people who, on the screen at least, were the heroes of our world(s). One of the pillars of pop culture as a whole is its inherent promise of being able to identify with heroes like that. Back in the days, I was just like JCvD: Made from steel, yet flexible and agile. Sassy and cool as fuck. That, of course, hadn’t much to do with my »reality« (if you haven’t realised it before: the discussion of real vs. virtual is a reoccuring theme of Ross’s poetry). Thus, I took the chance to interpret the poem with a psychoanalytic approach. Rule number one of the psychoanalysis club besides talking very carefully about the psychoanalysis club: If there’s a father, you want to kill him. Either literally or figuratively. The last few lines of the poem – Ross sure likes to deliver his punchlines and twists at the very end of a text – show the father, a figure of identification just like JCvD was like to me in my childhood, as a defeated and powerless person. By consoling him, the son (I doubt it is a daughter we are dealing with here) triumphs over his hero.

_

Recommended reading:

_

a-freudian-slip-is-when-you-say-one-thing-but-mean-your-mother

_

And hey, guess whom I am talking about in my comment on Ross’s Nude III! Yup, that’s right: Me again. The idea of »identical buildings« is very a powerful one as we surround ourselves with mass-produced objects all the time, architecture included. When I was first standing on the beach of Odaiba, the artificial island in the bay of Tokyo in 2010, metres away from what appeared to be the Lady Liberty (originally located outside of New York) and the Golden Gate Bridge (to be found on the other side of the USA, in San Francisco) at the horizon, I realised how immensly alienating it can be to see familiar objects (although, mind you, I’ve never actually stood before those two!) in a strange surrounding, i.e. a different cultural context. The effect Nude III had on me was similar: Here, everything and everyone seemed so familiar to me that I instantly sensed a feeling of alienation. The characters are stereotypical and blank to a point where they don’t seem human to me, even though they give me plenty to identify with. Which made me think: Is Ross maybe trying to tell us that people all over the world (or the privileged Western part of the world, to be more precise), regardless of them experiencing the same things in similar environments in mass-produced »identical buildings«, are still individuals? That cultural differences weren’t completely nullified by capitalism and its devil’s advocate, pop culture? If so, that would be completely banal. But aren’t most things that appear to be banal also true and important?

_

I definitely liked this one the most.

_

Recommended listening, part 1:

_

_

Recommended listening, part 2:

_

_

I was in for a big fat surprise when I published my essay on Richard Branson. Turns out the hyperlinks had originally not been part of the poem, but were later added by curator Simone Kornappel. Considering that I based my entire interpretation on those hyperlinks, it’s safe to say that I was bummed out, right? Nope, absolutely not. On the contrary: I was utterly delighted. In my essay, I completely ignored what Ross had written, but focused on the formal aspects of the poems. At the same time, the insertion of those hyperlinks offers an aid of interpreting the poem while introducing new ideas to it, thus making an interpretation a bit harder than if the poem came without them. After I’d used the theory of intertextuality to write about A Second Opinion, I witnessed its creative application to a poem.

_

The links referred me to the man who gave the poem its title – a music industry mogul -, poor, overlooked scientist Jocelyn Bell Burnell – who was never credited for the exciting discoveries she’d made because, guess what, she wasn’t born with a dick – and articles about the artwork of Joy Division’s masterpiece Unknown Pleasures. How are those topics, which are connected to the poem, connected to each other?, I asked myself. Simple: Bell Burnell discovered the pulsars which are depicted on the cover of Unknown Pleasures. And guess what, she didn’t get any credit for that, too. Because that is just how not only pop culture, but art itself works. »Talent borrows, genius steals«, Oscar Wilde is believed to have said once, elegantly summing up a cultural method which – although the basis of all creation – is frowned upon and systematically criminalised. Criminalised by people like Richard Branson, who in his time as CEO of Virgin has sued the fuck out of a lot of internet users who disseminated music released by his corporation on the internet without paying for it.

_

There’s an obvious connection between the aforementioned method of intertextuality – referring to, or: borrowing and stealing other ideas – and capitalism which the French philosopher Roland Barthes had already written about decades before sample-based music (a lot of which made Richard Branson a very, very rich man, by the way), the internet or filesharing were on the horizon. He proclaimed the Death of the Author, meaning that the person who creates something is never fully in control of what s_he does. Which, conincidentally happened to Ross who was – figuratively speaking – killed by Simone when she inserted all those hyperlinks in his poem. Which raised an interesting question: Had I really just commented on a poem written by Ross – or one written by Simone? Furthermore: Can we really say that the essay I wrote is genuinely my work? I did use an awful lot of ideas some other people had before me, didn’t I?

_

Recommended listening:

_

_

After that, there was only one poem left: Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love. Seriously, again? Yup, again the subject was love and again I identified it as a literary trope. A brief search for the word »love« in my »Music« folder came up with almost 1.500 music files out of 83.00 files in total (I’m a music journalist and a collector, after all). That’s a lot. So why not fight fire with fire, trope with trope? I posted some links to songs which, as I saw it, reflect what happens in the individual chapters of Ross’s poem. Additionally, I put a frame around that by adding Haddaway’s What Is Love? (which, by the way, was the first CD I’ve ever bought and probably listened to while skipping through Limit) and Tina Turner’s What’s Love Got To Do With It in order to to highlight its both Hegelian and circular structure. When linking to those music videos, I used the word »inevitable« without much thinking. A bit later, it dawned on me why I’d used that particular word: There’s a line in a song by The Ergs called Pray For Rain - »I just can’t wait for the day when inevitably / You say I’m not the guy you thought you knew when we have ‘The Talk’ / And you’ll regrettably inform me that you’re taking a walk« – which perfectly captures what is called the »Minneparadox« in German medieval poetry and provides the foundation for most literature on the subject of love: The impossibility or failure of a relationship (for whatever reasons) is what makes those sweet sad sappy love songs possible and successful pieces of art in the first place. Kudos to my subconscious for that. If you’re reading this (I know you do): I owe you one, pal.

_

Recommended listenting (over and over again because it’s terribly catchy and downright awesome):

_

_

Okay now. That was a lot already. But wait, there’s more.

_

I then wrote a final statement trying to explain my overall approach. Another thing I like about ¿Comment! is its transparency: Unlike an article, essay or review I publish in a printed magazine, readers can directly react to it and I have to take a stand, explain myself or justify my methods (if I don’t, I’d come across as a snob, right?). As this project explores the possibilities of promoting literature to a younger crowd, I felt like I should point out some notions and prejudices that have always bothered me when I was in school, still bother me on my occasional visists to university or when discussing literary criticism:

_

a) If it is considered to be important, it has to be good.

_

It’s okay not to like whatever it is that you were assigned to analyse, interpret, etc. In school, you are confronted almost exclusively with literature that is widely considered to be canonical. Canonisation itself is highly problematic, especially because it gives (young, inexperienced) readers the impression that they have to like something because someone has at some point decided it’s culturally relevant. Similarily, ¿Comment! also presents to you four authors (whom, coincidentally and unfortunately, all happen to be male) who have been pre-selected by people who, frankly put, know their shit when it comes to literature. Their writing has to be good, right? Nope, not necessarily. If you don’t like it, that’s perfectly fine.

_

b) If you don’t like it, it’s not worth your time.

_

Dealing with stuff that doesn’t resonate with you seems like a trite and unrewarding task, but it hasn’t got to be. It can actually be very rewarding. Spending time trying to make sense of a text that doesn’t appeal to you is much like having a conversation with someone who disagrees with you: Maybe they’ll win you over. Maybe by finding a way to articulate what exactly it is that you don’t like about it, you might improve your intellectual methods. Maybe you learn something about the opinions you’ve formed and how you present them and, thus, yourself. I’ve dealt with an abundance of literature and music that didn’t seem worth my time to me. But I think I’ve progressed a lot as a student, critic or art aficionado, maybe even as a person, by giving it a shot over and over again.

_

c) Some people’s opinions are more relevant than yours.

_

Even though I’m listed as a »Profileser« (»professional reader«), I don’t claim any kind of authority. If you think I’m a dick and you completely disagree with absolutely everything I’ve written here, go ahead and just tell me. Maybe I’ll feel offended, sure. Still, I’d be more offended knowing that people don’t want to disagree with me because they think that I am somehow above them. Disagreeing with me might make me re-evaluate my opinion or choice of words. Which is not necessarily a bad thing. I’ve said it before: I grew up discussing all the time. I’m used to it. I even appreciate it. Hell, I fully endorse it. After all, it’s all about having a dialogue, isn’t it? Let’s have it at eye level.

_

By Kristoffer Cornils

Ross Sutherland Jean-Claude van Damme

sutherland jcvd

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 7, zu “Jean-Claude van Damme”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: seit zwei Stunden suche ich 80er- und 90er-Trash, in dem die Freiheitsstatue beschädigt oder umkämpft wird. Kristoffer Cornils vermutet, dass Ross Sutherland hier eine Szene aus Roland Emmerichs “Universal Soldier” zitiert… aber ich glaube, er hat sich vergoogelt (“van Damme” + “Statue of Liberty” = Text über dieses Mahnmal in Manhattan). ich selbst denke bei Ross Sutherlands Pastiche zuerst an die mörderschlechte, unbedingt sehenswerte Intro-Sequenz des “G.I. Joe”-Trickfilms von 1987. 

.

“Terminator” (eher 2 als 1), “Stirb Langsam” (eher 3 als 1; auf keinen Fall 2), “Escape from New York” waren wichtige Actionfilme für mich Mitte der 90er, zwischen 12 und 14. Jean-Claude van Damme aber sah ich nur in “Street Fighter” (ein Kreis schließt sich) und, aktueller, in einem viralen Video (auch hier: unbedingt öffnen!), in dem er mich halb anekelt, halb amüsiert. im Frühling las ich eine lange Reportage über die verpfuschten “Street Fighter”-Dreharbeiten in Thailand… und seitdem seitdem sehe ich van Damme weniger als den prototypischen (Eurotrash-)Helden der Direct-to-Video-Filme der 80er und 90er… sondern als den prototypischen, gut gelaunten, hedonistischen (Eurotrash-)Videotheken-Besucher. Schmierig, aber charmant:
.

“Years later, Jean-Claude Van Damme admitted he had a serious drug problem while filming Street Fighter: The Movie. He also confessed to having an extramarital affair with co-star Kylie Minogue.
.

From the actor’s August 2012 interview with The Guardian:
.

“Yes,” says Van Damme, “Okay. Yes, yes, yes. It happened. I was in Thailand, we had an affair. Sweet kiss, beautiful lovemaking. It would be abnormal not to have had an affair, she’s so beautiful and she was there in front of me every day with a beautiful smile, simpatico, so charming, she wasn’t acting like a big star. I knew Thailand very well, so I showed her my Thailand. She’s a great lady.”‘

.

zweite Idee: heute also kann ich Jean-Claude van Damme mit etwas gutem Willen als schrägen Vogel lesen, naiven Horndog, Loveable Jock. vor 20 Jahren aber, in der Unterstufe, standen solche Helden, Sportskanonen, Strahlemänner auf der Gegenseite: ein Schlumpf wie Schlaubi kriegt regelmäßig eins auf Maul, und in einem van-Damme-, Chuck-Norris-, Steven-Seagal- oder Bud-Spencer-Film hätte ich nur Opfer, Freak oder Widerling sein dürfen, Kinder wie ich werden Scar statt Simba, Jaffar statt Aladdin, Mel Gibson lässt in “Braveheart” einen Schwulen aus dem Fenster werfen… mit 12 versteht ein Kinderpublikum, welche Menschen in welcher Geschichte erwünscht / willkommen sind.

.

wer hätte ich sein dürfen… im Erzählraum eines van-Damme-Films? höchstens der steife, blasse, tuntig-oder-sonst-irgendwie-sexuell-vermurkste Bösewicht? oder sein hoffnungsloser Sohn?

.

dritte Idee: Ross Sutherlands Gedicht trifft bei mir einen Nerv. und funktioniert – auch über die bloße Grundidee hinaus – hervorragend: Atomsprengköpfe, eine Wand aus Fernsehschirmen, Honduras, Rom, Washington, Peru, geheime Bösewicht-Tattoos, böse Agenten mit bös verbrauchter Haut (“fahl”, wie Konstantin Ames übersetzt? oder eher teigig, gelbstichig? sind nicht die meisten solcher Handlanger nicht-weiß?), eine Privatinsel, prächtige Uniformen, viel zu rotes Blut… all diese Bilder und Motive sind so perfekt klischiert und abgegriffen, ich sehe den Film vor mir, in all seiner Pracht, gedreht zwischen 1987 und 93.

.

besonders schön: Tattoos auf der Arschbacke? van Damme, der die Wachleute völlig nackt auszieht? warum sind solche Filme oft offen homophob – und bauen dann solche Kracher ein?

.

vierte Idee: mir gefällt die Lesart, der Kunstgriff, Ross Sutherlands Idee, dass das Kind eines erfolglosen, vernichtend geschlagenen Bösewichts den Triumph Jean-Claude van Dammes auf Video sehen kann, egal, ob auf Überwachungs-Tapes aus dem geheimen Hauptquartier oder eben als tatsächlicher Hollywood-Trashfilm (weil der Vater nur einen Bösewicht spielt? weil der Vater ein realer Terrorist war, dessen Geschichte in einem Jean-Claude-van-Damme-Projekt nacherzählt wurde? weil ein profanes Kind seinen profanen Vater wieder erkennt – in der Sorte Verlierer und Terror-Strippenzieher, die Video-Helden wie Jean-Claude van Damme jedes Mal besiegen?) egal: Ross Sutherlands Gedicht funktioniert auf all diesen Ebenen. mehr noch: es funktioniert besonders gut, weil es all diese Ebenen, Lesarten zulässt.

.

fünfte Idee: Fernsehen vs. das reale Leben. sich selbst auf Video sehen, sich selbst in Video-Figuren spiegeln, die eigene Geschichte in Popkultur erzählt bekommen, platte Helden, platte Feinde, platte Hollywood-Triumphe als Selbstbestätigung Amerikas, die Frage, ob der Bildschirm “die Wahrheit” zeigt und die grelle, künstliche Inszenierung “mehr Wahrheit” festhalten kann als das graue, tägliche Leben… das alles sind recht langweilig bekannte Gemeinschaftskunde- und Medienpädagogik-Fragen, und ich bin unsicher, ob Ross Sutherland viel Kluges, Neues beizutragen hat. trotzdem – auch, wenn die Fragen bekannt und die Klischeebilder abgegriffen sind: “Jean-Claude van Damme” hat mich von allen sieben hier veröffentlichten Arbeiten Ross Sutherlands am meisten überzeugt. gefällt mir!

.

gern gelesen: unbedingt, ja! ich wünschte, ich würde Jean-Claude van Damme besser kennen und könnte beurteilen, ob der Text zu ihm passt… oder ob das selbe Gedicht auch “Dolph Lundgren” hätte heißen können.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “There are reports of a life-sign inside the perimeter.” das “there are” wirkt clunky, unbeholfen. wer übermittelt dem Vater diese Nachricht?

.

später / danach:

.

“Runaways” erzählt von sechs Jugendlichen aus dem Marvel-Universum, die verstehen, dass ihre Eltern Superschurken sind. ich las letzten Herbst die ersten sechs von 52 Ausgaben… aber war nicht besonders überzeugt / interessiert.

.

ein Übersetzungs-Tadel: ich glaube, “Dad puts a bullet through his general’s eye” soll heißen: “Papa verpasst / schießt seinem General eine Kugel zwischen die Augen”, nicht “Papa schiebt eine Kugel durch sein Generalsauge.”

.

Musik-Assoziationen? ich denke an Bon Jovis platt-sympathische 90er-Jahre-Medienkritik “Real Life”: ein Song, der ähnliche Fragen stellt.

.

und: fast eine Woche lang dachte ich, die letzte Ziele wäre “it’s not OK to lose”. hätte mir besser gefallen – und den Erzähler interessanter gemacht.

.

weiter mit: meinem Abschluss-Statement, auf Englisch. erscheint am Dienstag, 23. September.

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?).

Blau_Comment

Zu Christian Prigent:  l’âme: le bleu, tomber du jour #2

 

Ich schreibe mir eine kleine Kulturgeschichte der Farbe Blau zusammen: Vor den chemischen Farben sind Blautöne Luxus. Lapislazuli ist so schwer erhältlich und in seiner Leuchtkraft so unnachahmlich, dass die Maler im Mittelalter seine Verwendung extra berechnen. Lapis lazuli ultramarine – Ultramarin – kommt als azurro ultramarino nach Venedig, buchstäblich von ‚jenseits des Meeres‘, aus Afghanistan. Das beständige, lichtechte Blau ist kaum durch Extrakte aus Blaukraut oder Beeren zu ersetzen. Auch aus gemahlenem Glas gewonnenes Blau erreicht nicht die Kraft, die es für die Darstellung atmosphärischer Muttergottesmäntel brauche (à propos, Wikipédia-Fund: Möglichkeiten, auf Französisch zu fluchen, ohne Blasphemie zu begehen: „Ventrebleu, palsembleu, corbleu, maugrebleu, parcorbleu, morbleu, parbleu, sacrebleu, tubleu, vertubleu, nom de bleu“).

Dazu mische ich aus meinem Sprach- und Literaturtuschkasten: blaue Blume, blaues Band, blauer Reiter (Kandinsky: „Je tiefer das Blau wird, desto tiefer ruft es den Menschen in das Unendliche, weckt in ihm die Sehnsucht nach Reinem und schließlich Übersinnlichem. Es ist die Farbe des Himmels.“)
Blauer Montag, Blauer Montag, Blausucht und Blausäure
Aber gibt es eine Seelengeschichte des Blaus?

Krzysztof Kieślowski hat im Jahr 1993 eine verfilmt

 

Trois couleurs: Bleu; Drei Farben: Blau
Und eine kleine französische Literaturgeschichte des Blaus?
Vor Prigent hat Arthur Rimbaud in einem Gedicht mit Farbe hantiert.

 

Das synästhetische  Sonett  „Voyelles“, 1883 veröffentlicht, sortiert die Vokale auf einer Farbpalette ein.

Das O ist blau:
“A noir, E blanc, I rouge, U vert, O bleu: voyelles”

Und im letzten Terzett heißt es:

“O, suprême Clairon plein des strideurs étranges,
Silences traversés des Mondes et des Anges “

von Stefan George übersetzt:

„O: seltsames Gezisch erhabener Posaunen
Einöden durch die Erd- und Himmelsgeister raunen.“

 

Was raunt der Text von Prigent?

 

Erstes Signal:
l’âme : le bleu …. Die Seele unterhält eine Doppelpunktbeziehung mit der Farbe Blau!
Gibt die Seele – dieses Nicht-Organ – Licht von einer bestimmten Qualität ab?

Zuerst greife ich nach der augenfälligen Form des Textes, Makrostruktur: 5 Strophen, die erste davon drei-, die übrigen – bis auf einen Zweizeiler, der das Ende ankündigt – vierzeilig:

le bleu déplorable
le bleu de prusse suspendu au noir
le bleu du déboire

le bleu de succion
le bleu de gnons
le bleu d’horions
le bleu de zéro horizon

le bleu de nuit
le bleu recuit
le bleu de cuite
le bleu de fuite

le bleu vite
le bleu vide

le bleu sans yeaux l’album
de l’oeuvide
l’albumine
de l’oeuf de moi vide

Die Strophen beginnen, bis auf die letzte – ausnahmslos mit dem Artikel ‘le’; der Text ist verblos und ergibt eine enumeratio, nein, eine Palette seelischer Blautöne.


 

Erste Strophe
le bleu déplorable – erstes Blau: und schon ein bedauernswertes?

le bleu de prusse …– Preussischblau, im Jahr 1706 vom Berliner Farbproduzenten Diesbach hergestellt, deswegen auch Berliner Blau genannt, drei Jahre später zum ersten Mal in der Malerei verwendet, in Theodor Fontanes Roman Frau Jenny Treibel in großem Umfang produziert: ein Blau, das nicht ausblutet, wetter- und lichtbeständig. Weitere Bezeichnungen: Pariser Blau! Chinesisch Blau!Sein Name variiert je nach Herstellungsverfahren, -ort und -eigenschaften.….

…suspendu au noir….

Eigenschaft im Text: reicht ins Schwarz hinein, ist an ihm aufgehängt. Die Nichtfarbe zieht das Blau auf ihre Seite, oder: reißt es an sich, knöpft es auf, hängt es auf? Ergibt Schwarzblau, das in assonante Atmosphäre fällt:

le bleu de déboir: Die Seele der Punkt, an dem Enttäuschung sich von der Handlung ‘Täuschung’                                                                                                          separiert

 

und auf das Subjekt einfällt.

Spricht hier ein Subjekt? Déboire-boire: Zu tief ins Glas? In die Seele geblickt?

 

Zweite Strophe

 

le bleu de succion: Es wird immer blauer, saugblau. Da saugt sich jemand so blau, dass nur noch ein
bleu de gnons
danach noch ein bleu d‘horions folgen kann

Schlagkräftiges Blau! Knock out? Augenblau?

le bleu de zéro horizon, wohl ein dunstiges Blau. Filmriss.

Vom Riss aus laufe ich die Zeilenstrecke noch einmal zurück, zum Ausgangspunkt, notiere: der blaue Sog war so stark, dass ich unbemerkt die Reimstufen hinunter gestürzt bin: – on – ons – ons- on
Und wieder hinunter: on – ons- ons – on

Die Strophe hat sich mir eingebläut!

 

Dritte Strophe

Da stehe ich nun, die Stufen Blau hinter mir.   Ist da noch jemand? Oder bleibt bloß Blau?

Aussichtslos. Die Nacht ist herangerückt. In Nachtblau, versteht sich:
le bleu de nuit

Vorangeschritten. Schon sind meine Schuhe vorm Hinabsteigen der nächsten Blautonstufen gespitzt: sie wittern die pfeifende Reimskala: -uit-uit-uite-uite.

Le bleu recuit
Le bleu de cuite
Le bleu de fuite

 

Nächtens glühts blau, folgt Brand, wer löscht das Feuer?

Fuite. Fort. ((Französische Redewendung: “Avoir une peur bleue”, ‚eine Heidenangst haben‘)

Vierte Strophe

le bleu vite
le bleu vide

Fluchtlinie, schwaches Zeilenpaar: das schnelle Blau ist aufgebraucht! Flasche leer?

Fünfte Strophe

Letzte Station der Palette: Einzeilig blau, dann klingt yeaux l’album/ de l’oeuvide/ l’albumine/de l’oeuf de moi vide.

 

Der Doppelpunkt ist aufgerauscht! Das Blau verkostet!

Die Seele, dieses Nacht-Organ, getunkt in Milch, Ei, Weizen -

 

gähnt Morgenweiß!

_________________

 

Und Eure poetische Farbenlehre?

 

(Rike Bolte)

 

 

ross sutherland experiment

ross sutherland experiment 2

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 6, zu “Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: das ist zu lang. und als Video schöner / sympathischer:

.

Ross Sutherland: Experiment to determine the Existence of Love (Youtube)

.

zweite Idee: ich lese dieses Gedicht als schnelle, eitle, spielerische und bewusst ausschweifende Gedanken- und Ideenburg, ehrgeizig, bunt, kleinteilig… aber beliebig und nicht sehr stabil. so (Link).

.

dritte Idee: alle Worte der deutschen Übersetzung alphabetisch sortiert, mit diesem Programm:

.

*rogueelements* 1 2 22 3 4 5 6 ab Alkohol Alle Alle alle als an an an Angst-Pufferzone anhaltend Ankreuzkästchenstimuli Ansagen Anstalten Anwendung Anwesenden Apparat Attrappe auf auf auf Aufriss auftauchen Auge ausgelöst ausgemusterte Ausrichtung Aussprache Auto Bad bedenklicher bedeutender Bein berühren bilden bin birgt Blickwinkel bloß blutet blutrote Brille Bräunungsstreifen Busfahrschein Bürgersteige Charlie da Dann Das das das das das das Das dass dass Daten Daten davon dazu deinem dem dem den den Der der der der der der Der der der der der der Der Der des Diagnose dicke die Die die die die die die Die die die die die die Die die Die die dieses Diskussion diskutieren Doppelstöckige drollige durch durch durchgeknallter eben ehe eher ein ein Ein ein Ein ein Ein ein eine einen einer einer eines einfach eingerechnet einzelnen Element Endstadium entworfen Entwurf er er Ergebnisse Ergebnisse Ernährung erröten erscheinen erst erste erwarteten erwiesen Es evident Existenz Experiment Experiment Experiment falls falsche fangen Fehleinschätzung fest Flussdiagramme flüchtige folgen fortgeschrittene funktioniert Funktionsvorgänge für für fürs Ganze geborstene gebracht gegen gehängt Geister gelöscht gemacht gerade gerichtet gescheitertes Geschwisterargwohn Glasauge glatthäutiges gleicht gleichwertig hebt hervor Herz Herzfraktal hier hinter Humber Hypothese hätte höchstwahrscheinlich ich Ich ich ihr ihrem im in in In indes Infolgedessen ins ins ist ist ist Jalapeno Jazz jedem jeder jeder jenseits John JPEGs kann Kein kein kein keine Kellners Kerzenwachs klinische Knöchel kommen Kommentar Kontrolldaten Kontrolle kratzende Kühlschränke L Laborergebnissen Lakshmi Laryngophone Leib lese letzten Leute Liebe Liebe Liebe Linie Luftfeuchte Mann meine Meinung Merke messgeschieberten Methode mindestens Minuten Minuten mit mit mit mit mit Mitternacht Mond Mundwasser Muss Nachbartisch Nacht Nachweis Nehmen neu Neugier nicht nicht Null Nur offensichtliche Organe paar Parabelkurve Parker Pfeile Poster prescht qua Reaktionsfähigkeit reitet Salm Salons Schaubild scheitert schlage schlechter Schlussfolgerung schneller Schnitt schnitten schob schreiben Schummrige schwarzes Schwein Schwein Seele sein selbst Selbstmordgedanken Serotoninreserven sich sich Sicherheitsvorkehrungen Sicht sie sie sind sind sind singt Skala so so Sodann Sodann sollen sollte Spaghetticode Spiegel Spiel Spiel Spirale stapeln Statistenrolle steigt Stifte subatomaren suche Säugling Süße Tag Tag Tausenden Testphase Theorie tief Tippex Toilettenschmierereien treffliche treiben tu Uhr Um und und Und und und und und uns unsere unsere unsere unserm unter unter unterblieben untilgbar unzulänglich Venn Verband Verbindungen verblichenes verblüffende verbunden verglichen Verminderter verseuchter vertrauenswürdig von von von vor vorerst Voruntersuchungen vorwiegend waren wartende Weg weg Weise werden werden werden widerspiegeln wie wie wie wie wie wieder Winter wir wir wir wir wir wir Wir Wirbel wird wird wissen Wissenschaft wohl würde würde würden zehn zehn zeigt Zeit zu zugeschrieben zum zur zur zurücktreibt zusammenstießen Zustand zwei zwei Zweifelsohne überleben überzeugenden überzeugt – „Yesterday“

.

vierte Idee: Humber? gegoogelt: Flussdelta in Nordengland. a faded poster of Lakshmi? gegoogelt: die hinduistische Göttin des Glücks. funny jpegs? ich weiß nicht, warum Ross Sutherland keine funny .gifs nimmt. John Venn? auch jemand, der 1000 funny Internetbilder macht. Laryngophon? gegoogelt: Kehlkopfmikrofon.

.

und: ich war überrascht, dass “not a good day for [dieses], but not a bad day for [jenes]” kein feste Wendung ist. sounds very British.

.

alle sechs Abschnitte des Gedichts haben andere Zeilenschemata. die Stelle, die für mich am besten funktioniert:

.

The heart’s fractal. The clinical vision.

The exploded body. The bloodless incision.

.

fünfte Idee: vieles hängt hier durch, hat keine Spannung, läufts ins Leere, verliert sich, bleibt unentschieden. lieblose (weil erstbeste) Bilder wie “a quick sketch of the soul”, “the spaghetti programming of the heart”, “crepuscular statements”, “the flowcharts stack up like decommissioned fridges”, “the night resembles a parabola curve”, “the thick, blood-red line surfaces like an insane, contaminated salmon”. unsaubere Perspektiven (“my sweetness”, “your calipered eye”, aber: “the way she lifts her leg into the waiting car”). und:

.

Alle Anwesenden waren einer Meinung,

dass das Schwein eher hätte ins Spiel gebracht werden sollen.

.

da stimme ich zu: das Baby auf dem schwarzen Schwein, die Saloon-Kulisse, der schlecht gespielte Kellner mit dem Glasauge… da wirds dann schnell zur Farce. das kommt zu spät und halbherzig.

.

gerne gelesen? als Video hält es zwei Minuten meiner Aufmerksamkeit. die Printversion macht mich müde.

.

schlechtestes Wort: “my sweetness”, weil es dem Text die Spannung nimmt und viel zu früh signalisiert: hier treffen sich nicht zwei Liebende, auf Augenhöhe. hier wird gespielt, gequatscht, die Frau bleibt ein Objekt / Untersuchungs-Utensil.

.

später / danach:

“Big Brother” hat zwei große Probleme mit Begriffen, seit beinahe 15 Jahren: die Produzenten und die “Big Brother”-Stimme werden wütend, wenn Kandidaten sich als Teilnehmer eines “Projekts” bezeichnen. “Big Brother”, stellen sie klar ist kein Projekt. am wenigsten: ein Projekt, getragen von den Bewohnern. egal, wie es sich für sie, im Container, anfühlt.

Psychologen und Wissenschaftler werden wütend, wenn “Big Brother” “Experiment” genannt wird. denn Experimente brauchen eine Grundfrage: etwas soll be- oder widerlegt werden. ich fühle mich bei Lektüre von “Experiment to determine the Existence of Love” wie ein Kandidat, im falschen Container abgestellt: die Fragestellung passt nicht zum Text. die Vorgänge, Handlungen, Themen passen nicht zur Fragestellung. die Bildwelten und der Ton bleiben ironisch-lässig-windschiefe Spielereien. alles ist fadenscheinig, unfertig. half-assed.

.

Konstantin Ames vermutet, der Text bleibt half-assed, um sich gegen die typischen Kritikmuster und -Anforderungen des Creative Writing zu stellen: the pig should have been introduced earlier? ein “Fuck you” an die Schreibschulen.

.

Konstantin Ames übersetzt “a minimum of two strong drinks” mit “mindestens zwei Doppelstöckige” (toll. nie gehört!)

.

…und beschreibt Segment Nr. 5 das Auf und Ab einer Erektion? gehts da um Penisse, in Wirklichkeit?

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherland, “Jean-Claude van Damme”

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?)

ross sutherland second opinion

ross sutherland secod opinion 2

.

kurze Texte zu den Gedichten von Ross Sutherland.

Text 5, zu “A Second Opinion”

Konstantin Ames schreibt hier. Kristoffer Cornils hier.

alle Texte von Stefan Mesch: [1. nude III] [2. Zangief] [3. try try try] [4. Branson] [5. Röntgen] [6. Experiment] [7. van Damme]

.

erste Idee: stell dir vor, Ross Sutherland plant ein Rodeo. doch er reitet keine Pferde, sondern Metaphern, und falls sich eine Metapher bäumt, ihn abzuschütteln droht, erzwingt er einen Richtungswechsel, damit sie sich vergaloppiert. so lange, bis die Metapher umfällt, kollabiert, beim Pferdeschlachter endet. aus jeder dritten… wird Lasagne!

.

ein schiefes Bild? nein. mehr: “Metaphorgotten” nennt meine liebste Website für angewandte Erzählforschung, TVtropes.org, Metaphern, die sich so schwungvoll lange am Leben halten, dass sie… im Altersheim noch auf den Tischen tanzen: Vergleiche, bewusst absurd verselbstständigt. Sinnbilder, die sich so weit von ihrem ursprünglichen Bezug entfernen, dass sie unterwegs zu Rätselbildern werden.

.

Metaphern also, die kurz Zigaretten holen gehen. dabei ihr Gedächtnis verlieren. nach Kassel ziehen, sich die Haare tönen und fünf Jahre später… eine Tabakhandlung öffnen. verspielt. vieldeutig. absurd.

.

zweite Idee: “Eine zweite Meinung” ist über weite Strecken herzig, sympathisch und langweilig. denn Lyrik lebt von offenen und widersprüchlichen Bedeutungen, Lücken, Entweder-Oders: hat eine Zeile zu viele mögliche Lesarten, wird sie beliebig. stehen alle Worte nur im Wortsinn brav am richtigen Platz, bleibt es banal. ich kann weite Teile von Ross Sutherlands Gedichts wie einen Alltags- und Gebrauchstext lesen: mal wieder ein Ich. mal wieder ein Du. dieses Mal in einer drolligen Welt, in der Röntgenbilder auch das Gefühls- und Innenleben abbilden.

.

oder (Möglichkeit 2): mit einem drollig-durchgeknallten Ich-Erzähler, der so tut, als ob.

.

oder (3) mit einem nicht-so-drollig verrückten Ich-Erzähler, der im Wahn spricht.

.

oder (4) in einer Welt wie unserer, in der zwei unglückliche Menschen in Metaphern die Zukunft ihrer Liebe verhandeln. ohne aber, dabei tatsächlich an “Gefühls-Röntgenbilder” zu glauben.

.

egal: verstehen lässt sich das Hin und Her zwischen einem aufgewühlten Ich (“I told you what was in my heart.”) und einem “naturally” skeptischen Du (“You told me to prove it”) auf all diesen Ebenen mühelos, und welches die “korrekte” Ebene ist (und wer das festlegt: Ross Sutherland?), muss / kann – das ist das große Glück, die große Chance von Lyrik – nicht entschieden werden. aber: vier solcher simpler Lesarten heißt nur: simpel mal vier. das ist noch nicht, was ich mir wünsche, wenn ich die “offenen und widersprüchlichen Bedeutungen, Lücken, Entweder-Oders” guter Lyrik lobe.

.

dritte Idee: denn trotz dieser vier Ebenen ist alles recht eindeutig erzählt, egal, ob nun Traum- oder Wahnwelt, Magie, Spinnerei oder bloß grauer Alltag dahinter stecken. Konstantin Ames’ Kommentar erklärt, wie literarisch bekannt / verbraucht die einzelnen Motive auf dem Röntgenbild auf ihn wirken. auch mir fehlt über weite Teile des Texts Raffinesse. bis dann die – tollen – “Metaphorgotten”-Rätselbilder kommen:

.

ich kann mir zusammen reimen, warum ein Stück menschlichen Innenlebens mit einem “collapsing pier” verglichen wird. aber was genau “bedeuten” die Stare?

.

“ein leerer Kleiderschrank”? gekauft! “ein toter Fuchs”? leuchtet mir ein. aber warum überlappen sich Kleiderschrank und Fuchs? hier wird es mehrdeutig. absurd und spannend: eine Röntgenaufnahme eines Brustkorbs wird vor ein Fenster gehalten und Nachbarn schauen darauf wie auf ein exhumiertes Grab, und das alles – das Innenleben des Erzählers = ein Bild seines Brustkorbs = ein exhumiertes Grab – sieht aus wie / erinnert an / kommt dem Erzähler vor wie “ein Skelett, das im Schornstein fest steckt”.

.

mein Innenleben ist eine Röntgenaufnahme ist ein exhumiertes Grab ist ein Skelett, das im Schornstein fest steckt. großartig!

.

vierte Idee: am Ende wird die Röntgenaufnahme (also: das Innenleben = das exhumierte Grab = das Skelett im Schornstein?) mit einem Septemberabend (…oder dem Bild eines Septemberabends) gleich gesetzt, der milde wirkt, doch dem man besser nur im Mantel entgegen treten sollte. “Ich habe darauf vertraut, dass du deinen Mantel mit dir nimmst” “on your way out” schiebt einen realen Ort, die Wohnung und das Wetter vor den Fenstern, gegen einen bildlichen: Geht das Du in die Welt des Röntgenbilds hinein… oder aus dem Apartment hinaus?

.

“Wenn du einen Platz in meinem Herzen willst, zieh dich warm an!” oder doch “Du bist schon halb zur Tür / aus unserer Beziehung raus: Und draußen, allein im echten Leben, ist es so kühl wie in meiner Brust. Erkälte dich nicht, wenn du gleich gehst und mich alleine lässt!”

.

fünfte Idee: “Occasionally you wonder if [Ross Sutherland] might be a parody of a poet and the joke is on us”, schreibt Tim Clare (Link). das ist hier, bei “A Second Opinion”, stärker als in allen sechs anderen Texten als Kompliment zu lesen: “Eine zweite Meinung” ist witzig, ohne albern zu sein. pointiert, aber nicht auf billige Pointen aus. ein süffiger, leichter, eindrücklicher Text. verständlich. aber – durch die Metaphern-Matryoshkas - geheimnisvoll statt platt.

.

gerne gelesen? ja. ich kann verstehen, dass es unter den “comment”-Kommentatoren das bisher beliebteste Ross-Sutherland-Gedicht ist.

.

schlechtestes Wort: zu viele amerikanische (Anfänger-)Kurzgeschichten, schrieb ein Creative-Writing-Professor oder New Yorker-Redakteur mal, enden mit dem Wort “home”. für mich setzt “on your way out” hier einen ähnlichen, etwas abgenutzten Effekt.

.

später / danach:

.

dass Ärzte oft eine zweite Meinung einholen, macht Sinn. dass Partner aber herumzweifeln, gar nicht wissen, was sie sehen und wie sie es bewerten sollen, am Ende sogar die Nachbarn um Kommentare bitten… greift gut, als böse, resignierte Metapher: ich habe dir mein Herz ausgeschüttet. aber du erkennst nichts. kannst mich nicht lesen, interpretieren, erkennen. und richtest dich nach den Meinungen der erstbesten Gaffer.

.

keine Song-Assoziation, dieses Mal. aber eine Idee, um eigene Metaphorgotten-Rätselbildketten zu schreiben: eine Aufzählung wie in R. Kellys “The World’s Greatest” wird spannender und komplizierter, sobald alle Vergleiche aufeinander Bezug nehmen statt immer nur auf das selbe Erzähler-Ich. “I am a mountain / I am a tall tree / Oh, I am a swift wind / Sweepin’ the country”? lieber “Ich bin ein Berg, groß wie ein Baum. Ein Baum, schnell wie ein Wind” usw.

.

mich enttäuscht, dass weder “Rorschach Ultrasound” noch “Rorschach X-Ray” gute Ergebnisse in der Google-Bildersuche bringen: beide medizinischen Techniken machen ein Innenleben sichtbar. aber sind für Laien schwer zu lesen.

.

weiter mit: Ross Sutherlands »Experiment to determine the Existence of Love«

.

Stefan Mesch, geboren 1983, schreibt für ZEIT Online und den Berliner Tagesspiegel. Er studierte Kreatives Schreiben und Kulturjournalismus in Hildesheim, war Herausgeber von BELLA triste und Mitveranstalter des Literaturfestivals PROSANOVA und arbeitet an seinem ersten Roman, “Zimmer voller Freunde”. Als Liveblogger begleitete er u.a. das lit.futur-Festival 2013 und den Berliner Open Mike 2012. Buchtipps, Essays, Interviews und Texte auch auf seinem Blog… und erschreckend oft bei Facebook (Freund werden?)

1 2 3 4