Suchergebnisse für cornils

love

love

Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love von Ross Sutherland

_

0. Before the inevitable hypothesis

1. Hypothesis

2. Apparatus

3. Diagram

4. Method

5. Results

6. [Discussion]

7. After the inevitable discussion

8. But do we want it any other way?

Von Kristoffer Cornils

tumblr_mmwss5444R1qz5r5lo1_1280

Richard Branson von Ross Sutherland

Ein Text von Kristoffer Cornils

c kristoffer cornils

c kristoffer cornils

_

As a so called digital native, I grew up discussing a lot. Ever since I’ve first went online with a dial-up modem to chat with strangers on AOL, I’ve enjoyed being able to have a dialogue with like-minded people at any time I wanted to. Over the time the net has changed. After AOL lost its appeal, I signed up to message boards, then social networks. My attitude changed, too. I don’t go on the internet anymore hoping to find people with whom I agree. A dialogue with people who think just like you is fruitless, isn’t it?

_

I write a lot of reviews and articles on music and literature. Naturally, people often disagree with me and verbalise their disagreement in various ways. I like that. I don’t want to be that person who tells you what to think – I just want to throw my opinion in the ring, contribute to a greater discourse. Provide one voice where there are many others, thus expanding my horizons through other people’s perspectives.

_

Hence ¿Comment! seemed like the perfect project to me. Not only was I able to work with more than just words, but also pictures, music, etc., but I would automatically enter a dialogue of sorts. With Ross Sutherland’s poetry, the commentary provided by Stefan Mesch and Ross’s translator, Konstantin Ames, and on top of that everyone else assigned to or interested in joining the discussion on this blog or other social media like Facebook.

_

There remained one problem, though: As great as it is to have a multilingual – German, English, French – dialogue, a lot of that gets lost in translation. Ross even reached out to me on Twitter asking if I could clarify some of the points I made because Google Translate couldn’t make much sense of it. Which is probably my fault because I like to toy around with words too much, thus making any attempt to auto-translate my writings a futile task. When Katharina Deloglu asked me to provide a brief summary of my short essays on Ross’s poems, it made a lot of sense to me. After all, he should be able to join the dialogue just like everyone else, shouldn’t he?

_

Having said all this, it should be obvious why I started out with Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again). In my essay, I reflect upon my own childhood, how it was shaped by the various media (comics, books, TV, video games) I consumed growing up and how they changed my perception of reality or, to be more precise, the concept of reality. Ross and I were born only a few years apart, but it seems to me like the differences in our perception of what is real and virtual are quite different. I don’t like to consider those two concepts – »reality« and »virtuality« – as opposed entities, but rather as complementary to each other, if not completely indistinguishable. I mean, just take a look at your smartwatch: It is 2014, isn’t it? However, the last lines of Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again) make me think that Ross tries to warn us of the »real-life« ramifications of looking at things through the lense of »virtuality«. It actually reminded me of those times when my mum scolded me for reading too much or watching TV endlessly instead of going outside to play, i.e. spend time in the »real world«. To me, that seemed rather conservative.

_

Recommended listening/watching:

_

_

Choosing Zangief  next made perfect sense to me. Again I was able to put the »me« in »media«: I spend Chtulu knows how many days of my childhood years mashing the buttons of an SNES joypad. I usually lost. Partly due to the lack of any actual skills and maybe because I preferred the female characters in Street Fight. They are by default weaker than the dudes you could choose from. Thus, I took the opportunity to connect Ross’s decision with an ongoing debate in the gaming community, linking it to the latent sexism in the game industry and how those games perpetuate sexist stereotypes. My idea was that, while Ross’s poem is neither sexist nor deals directly with sexism, his choice of character – a visibly potent, powerful and hypermasculine male – indirectly contributes to that perpetuation of stereotypes. I then tried to deconstruct the myth of the alpha male as depicted by the game by pointing out its homoerotic implications. In Zangief, the Russian street fighter battles a bear – »bear« is conincidentally a term used by the gay community to describe homosexual men who pretty much look exactly like Zangief. That was a freebie.

_

The bear, however, has yet another connotation: It’s a symbol for Russia – which is where Zangief comes from according to the game manual provided by Nintendo. Street Fighter is not only inherently sexist, but also incredibly racist. Ross’s poem seemed like a perfect satire of this, because it takes all the stereotypes so far that they ultimately seem utterly absurd. Job well done, I thought. Until I started thinking about its political implications in the particular (geo-)political situation we are experiencing right now. When covering the current crisis in Ukraine, the media and people on the internet make use of a lot of stereotypes – both negative and positive – to describe and depict Russia. Point in case: It took me about five seconds to find a photoshopped image of Vladimir Putin riding a bear. Go figure. In the end, that gives Ross’s poem even more power. However, it’s an ambiguous kind of power: Is Ross providing a tongue-in-cheek critique on the way Russia is portrayed – or does he himself contribute to that by perpetuating those stereotypes?

_

Disclaimer: I have since learned that Zangief is actually part of a cycle of poems, each one devoted to another character from the Street Fighter universe. Yes, that includes the female ones. Thus my criticism is partly, if not completely invalid. It is also worth noting that Ross wrote the poem long before the ongoing debate about sexism in games (although the topic itself isn’t exactly brand new) or the conflict involving Russia and Ukraine (although Putin’s rise to even more power also can’t be considered a novelty). My decision to connect the text to those two issues regardless of the time difference between it was written and where in we are now is based on my belief that any piece of art from any time in history can and should be applied to any other time in history.

_

Recommended watching:

_

_

The idea that forms the foundation of A Second Opinion, i.e. taking a metaphor way too literally, has always been a common trope in literature. I used some examples, notably Heiner Müller’s aptly titled Herzstück (Heart Piece), to locate Ross’s poem in this particular tradition. Obviously, it pales in comparision to the dry humour of Müller. But that’s besides the point. A Second Opinion is yet another literary discussion of how words, i.e. what literature is made of, can fail (us). It touches on the eternal paradox of literature as a form of communication (and of course communication itself, as it is always also literary as it heavily relies on metaphors, metonymies, etc.) that somehow provides a meaning by simultaneously concealing it. Bottom line: Language is tricky as hell and if you throw love into the ring, too, things will inevitably (that word will have a comeback later in similar context) lead to communicative and emotional chaos.

_

Recommended watching:

_

_

With my essay on Jean-Claude van Damme, I took another chance to dive into my childhood memories. JCvD used to adorn the cover of a magazine I used to read when I was aged seven or eight. Limit was aimed at young boys like me, offering a glimpse in the world of people who, on the screen at least, were the heroes of our world(s). One of the pillars of pop culture as a whole is its inherent promise of being able to identify with heroes like that. Back in the days, I was just like JCvD: Made from steel, yet flexible and agile. Sassy and cool as fuck. That, of course, hadn’t much to do with my »reality« (if you haven’t realised it before: the discussion of real vs. virtual is a reoccuring theme of Ross’s poetry). Thus, I took the chance to interpret the poem with a psychoanalytic approach. Rule number one of the psychoanalysis club besides talking very carefully about the psychoanalysis club: If there’s a father, you want to kill him. Either literally or figuratively. The last few lines of the poem – Ross sure likes to deliver his punchlines and twists at the very end of a text – show the father, a figure of identification just like JCvD was like to me in my childhood, as a defeated and powerless person. By consoling him, the son (I doubt it is a daughter we are dealing with here) triumphs over his hero.

_

Recommended reading:

_

a-freudian-slip-is-when-you-say-one-thing-but-mean-your-mother

_

And hey, guess whom I am talking about in my comment on Ross’s Nude III! Yup, that’s right: Me again. The idea of »identical buildings« is very a powerful one as we surround ourselves with mass-produced objects all the time, architecture included. When I was first standing on the beach of Odaiba, the artificial island in the bay of Tokyo in 2010, metres away from what appeared to be the Lady Liberty (originally located outside of New York) and the Golden Gate Bridge (to be found on the other side of the USA, in San Francisco) at the horizon, I realised how immensly alienating it can be to see familiar objects (although, mind you, I’ve never actually stood before those two!) in a strange surrounding, i.e. a different cultural context. The effect Nude III had on me was similar: Here, everything and everyone seemed so familiar to me that I instantly sensed a feeling of alienation. The characters are stereotypical and blank to a point where they don’t seem human to me, even though they give me plenty to identify with. Which made me think: Is Ross maybe trying to tell us that people all over the world (or the privileged Western part of the world, to be more precise), regardless of them experiencing the same things in similar environments in mass-produced »identical buildings«, are still individuals? That cultural differences weren’t completely nullified by capitalism and its devil’s advocate, pop culture? If so, that would be completely banal. But aren’t most things that appear to be banal also true and important?

_

I definitely liked this one the most.

_

Recommended listening, part 1:

_

_

Recommended listening, part 2:

_

_

I was in for a big fat surprise when I published my essay on Richard Branson. Turns out the hyperlinks had originally not been part of the poem, but were later added by curator Simone Kornappel. Considering that I based my entire interpretation on those hyperlinks, it’s safe to say that I was bummed out, right? Nope, absolutely not. On the contrary: I was utterly delighted. In my essay, I completely ignored what Ross had written, but focused on the formal aspects of the poems. At the same time, the insertion of those hyperlinks offers an aid of interpreting the poem while introducing new ideas to it, thus making an interpretation a bit harder than if the poem came without them. After I’d used the theory of intertextuality to write about A Second Opinion, I witnessed its creative application to a poem.

_

The links referred me to the man who gave the poem its title – a music industry mogul -, poor, overlooked scientist Jocelyn Bell Burnell – who was never credited for the exciting discoveries she’d made because, guess what, she wasn’t born with a dick – and articles about the artwork of Joy Division’s masterpiece Unknown Pleasures. How are those topics, which are connected to the poem, connected to each other?, I asked myself. Simple: Bell Burnell discovered the pulsars which are depicted on the cover of Unknown Pleasures. And guess what, she didn’t get any credit for that, too. Because that is just how not only pop culture, but art itself works. »Talent borrows, genius steals«, Oscar Wilde is believed to have said once, elegantly summing up a cultural method which – although the basis of all creation – is frowned upon and systematically criminalised. Criminalised by people like Richard Branson, who in his time as CEO of Virgin has sued the fuck out of a lot of internet users who disseminated music released by his corporation on the internet without paying for it.

_

There’s an obvious connection between the aforementioned method of intertextuality – referring to, or: borrowing and stealing other ideas – and capitalism which the French philosopher Roland Barthes had already written about decades before sample-based music (a lot of which made Richard Branson a very, very rich man, by the way), the internet or filesharing were on the horizon. He proclaimed the Death of the Author, meaning that the person who creates something is never fully in control of what s_he does. Which, conincidentally happened to Ross who was – figuratively speaking – killed by Simone when she inserted all those hyperlinks in his poem. Which raised an interesting question: Had I really just commented on a poem written by Ross – or one written by Simone? Furthermore: Can we really say that the essay I wrote is genuinely my work? I did use an awful lot of ideas some other people had before me, didn’t I?

_

Recommended listening:

_

_

After that, there was only one poem left: Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love. Seriously, again? Yup, again the subject was love and again I identified it as a literary trope. A brief search for the word »love« in my »Music« folder came up with almost 1.500 music files out of 83.00 files in total (I’m a music journalist and a collector, after all). That’s a lot. So why not fight fire with fire, trope with trope? I posted some links to songs which, as I saw it, reflect what happens in the individual chapters of Ross’s poem. Additionally, I put a frame around that by adding Haddaway’s What Is Love? (which, by the way, was the first CD I’ve ever bought and probably listened to while skipping through Limit) and Tina Turner’s What’s Love Got To Do With It in order to to highlight its both Hegelian and circular structure. When linking to those music videos, I used the word »inevitable« without much thinking. A bit later, it dawned on me why I’d used that particular word: There’s a line in a song by The Ergs called Pray For Rain - »I just can’t wait for the day when inevitably / You say I’m not the guy you thought you knew when we have ‘The Talk’ / And you’ll regrettably inform me that you’re taking a walk« – which perfectly captures what is called the »Minneparadox« in German medieval poetry and provides the foundation for most literature on the subject of love: The impossibility or failure of a relationship (for whatever reasons) is what makes those sweet sad sappy love songs possible and successful pieces of art in the first place. Kudos to my subconscious for that. If you’re reading this (I know you do): I owe you one, pal.

_

Recommended listenting (over and over again because it’s terribly catchy and downright awesome):

_

_

Okay now. That was a lot already. But wait, there’s more.

_

I then wrote a final statement trying to explain my overall approach. Another thing I like about ¿Comment! is its transparency: Unlike an article, essay or review I publish in a printed magazine, readers can directly react to it and I have to take a stand, explain myself or justify my methods (if I don’t, I’d come across as a snob, right?). As this project explores the possibilities of promoting literature to a younger crowd, I felt like I should point out some notions and prejudices that have always bothered me when I was in school, still bother me on my occasional visists to university or when discussing literary criticism:

_

a) If it is considered to be important, it has to be good.

_

It’s okay not to like whatever it is that you were assigned to analyse, interpret, etc. In school, you are confronted almost exclusively with literature that is widely considered to be canonical. Canonisation itself is highly problematic, especially because it gives (young, inexperienced) readers the impression that they have to like something because someone has at some point decided it’s culturally relevant. Similarily, ¿Comment! also presents to you four authors (whom, coincidentally and unfortunately, all happen to be male) who have been pre-selected by people who, frankly put, know their shit when it comes to literature. Their writing has to be good, right? Nope, not necessarily. If you don’t like it, that’s perfectly fine.

_

b) If you don’t like it, it’s not worth your time.

_

Dealing with stuff that doesn’t resonate with you seems like a trite and unrewarding task, but it hasn’t got to be. It can actually be very rewarding. Spending time trying to make sense of a text that doesn’t appeal to you is much like having a conversation with someone who disagrees with you: Maybe they’ll win you over. Maybe by finding a way to articulate what exactly it is that you don’t like about it, you might improve your intellectual methods. Maybe you learn something about the opinions you’ve formed and how you present them and, thus, yourself. I’ve dealt with an abundance of literature and music that didn’t seem worth my time to me. But I think I’ve progressed a lot as a student, critic or art aficionado, maybe even as a person, by giving it a shot over and over again.

_

c) Some people’s opinions are more relevant than yours.

_

Even though I’m listed as a »Profileser« (»professional reader«), I don’t claim any kind of authority. If you think I’m a dick and you completely disagree with absolutely everything I’ve written here, go ahead and just tell me. Maybe I’ll feel offended, sure. Still, I’d be more offended knowing that people don’t want to disagree with me because they think that I am somehow above them. Disagreeing with me might make me re-evaluate my opinion or choice of words. Which is not necessarily a bad thing. I’ve said it before: I grew up discussing all the time. I’m used to it. I even appreciate it. Hell, I fully endorse it. After all, it’s all about having a dialogue, isn’t it? Let’s have it at eye level.

_

By Kristoffer Cornils

listen_to_yourself

listen_to_yourself_

Ich war mir beim ersten Überfliegen schon relativ sicher, mittlerweile aber weiß ich es: Ich mag die Lyrik Ross Sutherlands nicht. Ich finde sie überdreht und bemüht. Ein wenig prätentiös im Ganzen. Ross ist Performer und seine Gedichte lassen sich vielleicht besser live im Vortrag als auf einem Screen erleben. Auch wenn nicht glaube, dass sie mir dann wesentlich besser gefallen würden.

_

Ich kann mir trotzdem schon vorstellen, dass sie jemand mag: Sie haben einen gewissen Humor, vollziehen absurde Wendungen, sind fantasievoll. Zumal sie gerade ein jüngeres Publikum ansprechen könnten. Eins, das mit dem Fernseher, Street Fighter und dem Internet aufgewachsen ist. Das Leben mit und in Medien ist ein zentrales Leitmotiv in Ross’ Lyrik, es erschließt sich womöglich am besten denen, die darin ihre eigene Lebensrealität gespiegelt sehen. Dazu gehöre ich eigentlich auch, und doch mag ich diese Texte nicht. Sorry, Ross.

_

Kurzum: Ich würde mich eigentlich nicht freiwillig mit diesen sieben Gedichten beschäftigen. Ich musste es im Rahmen dieses Projekts aber tun.

_

Es fiel mir nicht sehr schwer.

_

Als Leser im stillen Kämmerlein, Schüler im Deutsch-Grundkurs, Student der Literaturwissenschaften, Kritiker und Veranstalter von Literaturevents habe ich gelernt, dass sich nicht nur die Beschäftigung mit der (vermeintlich) Unverständlichen, sondern auch dem Nicht-Gemochten lohnen kann. Zumindest ist sie jederzeit möglich. Jeder Text bietet eine Vielzahl von Anknüpfpunkten und/oder Angriffsflächen. Auch wenn es ein wenig Überwindung kostet: Aus jedem Stück Literatur lassen sich Gedanken filtern, ästhetische Konzepte herausziehen oder neue Ideen extrahieren. Selbst wenn etwas nichts als Widerspruch hervorruft, erfüllt es schon einen Zweck.

_

Es war mir beim Verfassen meiner Kommentare wichtig, meine ganz eigene Position zu den Texten exponiert herauszustellen. Denn ich bin es hier, der seine Assoziationen, Interpretation sowie gelegentlich seine Kritik äußert. Wenn wir uns mit Literaturvermittlung befassen, dürfen wir nicht vergessen, dass es im Umgang mit Literatur keine Kategorien wie richtig oder falsch gibt. Und dementsprechend auch das Oppositionspaar objektiv und subjektiv ein heikles ist. Ich kann mich unmöglich von meinem Hineinwachsen in die neuen Medien losmachen, wenn ich über Ross’ Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again) schreibe. Ich ziehe es vor, das auch offen herauszustellen, anstatt meine Person hinter einer Objektivität zu verschanzen, die es meiner Meinung nach so nicht gibt.

_

Viele der Teilnehmenden sind Schüler_innen. Vielleicht nicht hundertprozentig freiwillig dabei, vielleicht nicht wirklich mit dem Herz bei der Sache. Vielleicht ein wenig eingeschüchtert davon, nicht ganz zu kapieren, worum es in Text xy eigentlich »geht«. »Was uns der Autor (nebenbei: ich finde es schon etwas unglücklich, dass wir nur Texte von Männern zu lesen bekommen) damit sagen will.« Vielleicht etwas ratlos, ob die eigenen Assoziationen und Gedanken zu einem Gedicht diesem wirklich gerecht werden.

_

Ich habe versucht, mich auf sieben verschiedenen Arten an sieben verschiedene Gedichte heranzumachen, um eine Idee davon zu geben, wie vielfältig die Beschäftigung mit Literatur ausfallen kann.

_

Im Kommentar zum Text Zangief bin ich sehr weit gegangen, indem ich den Text mit zwei politischen Diskursen verbunden, die so direkt im Text nicht angesprochen werden: Sexismus in der Videospielindustrie (sowie die latente Homoerotik des character designs von Spielen wie Street Fighter) und die derzeitige gesellschaftspolitische Lage in Russland.

_

A Second Opinion bin ich dann mit intertextuellem Ansatz angegangen. Die Metapher des Herzens wörtlich zu nehmen, um damit auf die Grenzen unserer Sprache hinzuweisen, das wird bereits in anderen Texten gemacht oder zumindest vorbereitet. Ich habe an dieser Stelle zum Beispiel auch nur diejenigen aufgezählt, die mir aufgefallen sind – dabei hätte ich vielleicht noch auf Hugo von Hofmannsthals Ein Brief hinweisen können oder einige Gedichte Arthur Rimbauds… Das ist eben auch meine subjektive Beigabe: Ich selektiere, ob gewollt oder nicht.

_

Zu Jean-Claude van Damme wählte ich, ähnlich wie zu Inifinite Lives (Try, try, try again) einen persönlichen, autobiografischen Zugang, um eine eher psychoanalytische Deutung zu versuchen. Inklusive der sehr ausgeleierten Pointe, dass dort eigentlich ein Ödipuskonflikt ausgespielt wird.

_

Für meinen Kommentar zu Nude III bin ich dann schon etwas tiefer in die Wortebene eingetaucht und bin dem Text mit meinen eigenen Erfahrungen begegnet. Das ist wohl der Kommentar, der am ehesten klassisch-hermeneutisch funktioniert.

_

Als ich mich mit Richard Branson befasste, war mir sofort klar: Scheißegal, was dir der Text erzählt, viel spannender sind die Hyperlinks. So habe ich das Gedicht eher von seiner formalen Seite, nicht seinem Inhalt her betrachtet und konnte daraus – wie ich finde – ein paar interessante Schlüsse ziehen. Noch interessanter wurde es, als ich darauf hingewiesen wurde, dass die Hyperlinks gar nicht von Ross in den Text eingeführt wurden – was nahezu unheimlich gut in meine Argumentation passte.

_

Das Experiment to Determine the Existence of Love bin ich im Grund sehr ähnlich angegangen wie A Second Opinion (was sich allein thematisch anbot). Zeigen wollte ich damit eher, dass ein Kommentar nicht immer mit (den eigenen) Worten stattfinden muss. Der Song von The Ergs beispielsweise fasst mit seinen Lyrics gut zusammen, was seit dem Minnesang als Paradox der Liebeslyrik gilt: Ohne deren Scheitern wäre sie nicht so spannend.

_

Ich halte jeden meiner Kommentare zu Ross’ Lyrik für ein absolut legitimes Statement.

_

Dennoch: Ich halte jeden meiner Kommentare zu Ross’ Lyrik für absolut angreifbar.

_

Wenn wir uns mit Literaturvermittlung befassen, dürfen wir nicht vergessen, dass es vor allem darum geht, einen Dialog zu schaffen. Verschiedene Perspektiven nebeneinander zu stellen, selbst wenn sie sich widersprechen. Zu streiten, einander zuzustimmen. Das sagt ¿comment! – Lesen ist schreiben ist lesen bereits mit dem Titel aus, die Praxis stellt sich genauso dar: Ihr könnt meine Kommentare kommentieren. Ihr sollt es sogar. Denn ich kann mir zwar vorstellen, dass es noch andere Sichtweisen und Möglichkeiten des Kommentierens zu Ross’ Text gäbe – ich kann sie nur für mich nur schlecht ausformulieren, habe meine Grenzen.

_

Ich halte insofern jeden eurer Kommentare zu meinen Kommentaren zu Ross’ Lyrik unbesehen für ein absolut legitimes Statement.

_

Ich habe im Rahmen dieses Projekts das Label »Profileser« aufgedrückt bekommen. Das impliziert ungewollt eine gewisse Autorität, die ich eigentlich nicht inne habe. Zumindest habe ich keine über euch und eure Gedanken. Wenn ich es als okay empfinde, Ross’ Gedichte nicht zu mögen und das auch zu schreiben, dann soll es euch doch wohl ebenfalls gestattet sein, meine Texte nicht zu mögen.

_

Ich freue mich deshalb auf Zu- genauso wie auf Widerspruch.

Von Kristoffer Cornils

tumblr_mmwss5444R1qz5r5lo1_1280

tumblr_mmwss5444R1qz5r5lo1_1280

Richard Branson von Ross Sutherland?

_

Ich wusste nicht, wer Richard Branson ist. Wozu aber gibt es Wikipedia? Ross Sutherland tut mir den Gefallen, direkt auf den Eintrag zum Virgin-Gründer zu verlinken. Das gesamte Gedicht Richard Branson ist mit Hyperlinks angereichert. So wird dann der Text zum Hypertext. Er verbindet sich mit der Welt und schafft in sich neue Querverweise. »My love« und »combination« linken beide auf die Wikipedia-Seite zu Jocelyn Bell Burnell, die mir ebenfalls nicht bekannt war, von der ich vielleicht nie etwas gehört hätte, wenn Sutherland mich nicht von den Worten »My love« und »combination« zu ihr gelockt hätte.

_

Richard Branson vernetzt auf diese subtile Art Themen miteinander: Naturwissenschaft, Popkultur, Kommerz. Die sind so nicht offensichtlich in den Text eingeflochten, sondern werden drangetackert. Das Gedicht erklärt sich damit ein bisschen, hilft bei der Interpretation – und macht sie gleichzeitig schwieriger, weil die Informationen zunehmen und sich noch mehr Gedankenfäden zusammenstricken.

_

Wo wir schon beim Text sind, können wir ja auch gleich zu den Textilien übergehen: In seinem Buch Unknown Pleasures erzählt Peter Hook über die Zeit bei Joy Division, dass die Band in ihrer mal ordentlich zur Kasse gebeten. Es ging um nicht versteuerte Einkünfte, die aus Merch-Verkäufen hervorgingen. Das Finanzamt kassierte die Band gnadenlos ab, obwohl die beteuerte, niemals überhaupt Bandshirts produziert zu haben. Das muss wohl auch unglaubwürdig gewirkt haben: In den Straßen von Manchester waren überall Joy Division-Shirts zu sehen. What is this? I’ve seen it on tumblr.

_

black-flag-cat

_

Diese Shirts sind auch aus dem Berliner Stadtbild noch 24 Jahre nach Ian Curtis’ Selbstmord nicht wegzudenken. Im Mauerpark verkaufen Bootlegger sie neben anderen Shirts, die zum Beispiel Raymond Pettibons Black Flag-Logo oder das Cover von Sonic Youths Goo zeigen. Das ikonische Artwork von Peter Saville zum Joy Division-Debütalbum aber wurde auf ganz besondere Art weitergetragen. Sogar Disney erlaubte sich ein Rip-Off-Design. Weil eine Band, die sich ihren Namen von einem KZ-Zwangsbordell aus dem Roman House Of Dolls geliehen und deren Sänger sich vor seinem Suizid Lyrics wie »Existence, well what does it matter« aus den Fingern geleiert hat, ja auch so kinderfreundlich ist.

_

Die Weiterverwendung von Savilles Design zieht häufig Empörung nach sich. Sie richtet sich gegen Einzelpersonen, die »nicht mal wissen, wer Joy Division sind« oder generell »keine Ahnung von Musik haben«. Sie richtet sich kommerzielle Unternehmen, die die Indie-Band Joy Division vom Indie-Label Factory (über das übrigens der vielleicht beste Musikfilm aller Zeiten gedreht wurde) für ihre Zwecke verwenden. Sie richtet kurz gesagt dagegen, dass das Design aus seinem subkulturellen Kontext gerissen wird, im Internet landet und disseminiert. Bis niemand mehr darin seine ursprüngliche Bedeutung, sondern nur noch ein schönes Stück Design sieht. What is this? I’ve seen it on tumblr.

_

Dabei hat Saville es eigentlich – nach einem Hinweis von Drummer Stephen Morris – selbst ebenfalls gestohlen, aus seinem Kontext gerissen und wie ein bedeutungsloses Stück Design behandelt. Und Jocelyn Bell Burnell keinen Credit dafür gegeben, die durch die Linien abgebildeten Pulsare jemals entdeckt zu haben. Hier verheddern sich nämlich zwei Stricke, die Sutherland per Hyperlink in den Text eingeflochten hat. Und lassen weiterdenken: Bell Burnell hat für ihre Arbeit sonst ebenfalls wenig Anerkennung gefunden, landete immer auf dem zweiten Platz hinter ihren männlichen Kollegen.

_

_

»Here I was all stressing about copyright infringement… but now it looks like the image itself might have been infringed upon already!«, steht in dem von Sutherland verlinkten Text über die Geschichte des Artworks von Unknown Pleasures. So macht Sutherland eine Meta-Ebene auf: Indem er auf fremde Quellen verweist, thematisiert er unseren Umgang mit fremden Quellen. Es geht ums Urheberrecht, auf das Großkonzerne wie das von Richard Branson gegründete Virgin pochen, wenn sie gegen Filesharing vorgehen. Dabei geht es nicht um den Respekt gegenüber den Künstler_innen, sondern schlicht ums Geld. Viel Geld. Und das, obwohl zum Beispiel Virgin Millionen mit Rap-Artists gemacht haben und Hip Hop ohne seinen – sagen wir mal: großzügigen – Umgang mit Samples und damit auch Urheberrechten nicht denkbar gewesen wäre.

_

_

Schon 1956 wies der Philosoph Roland Barthes auf den Zusammenhang von Urheberrecht und Kapitalismus hin. »Der Tod des Autors« hieß der Text, der zum geflügelten Wort wurde. Der Autor (und bestimmt auch wohl die Autorin) hat laut Barthes nicht wie zuvor propagiert die absolute Kontrolle über sein Werk. Mit seinem Tod fängt die »Geburt des Lesers« an. Das Lesen eines Textes bedeutet damit auch immer schreiben, nämlich in den Text einschreiben. So, als würde ein_e Leser_in Hyperlinks in die Zeilen vor ihr_ihm einfügen. Das stellt natürlich auch das Urheberrecht infrage. Wenn wir erst eigentlich dem Text einen Sinn geben – warum soll die Person, die ihn geschrieben hat, die Kohle dafür bekommen? Und eh: Müsste diese Person nicht was abgeben – an alle Menschen, deren Werke sie hat in diesen Text einfließen lassen?

_

copyright

_

Barthes veröffentlicht diesen Text zu einem kulturgeschichtlich interessanten Zeitpunkt: Es ist auch die Geburtsstunde der Popkultur. Pop-Musik, so analysiert etwa der Pop-Theoretiker und Journalist Diedrich Diederichsen, wäre ohne ihre Rezipient_innen nicht denkbar. Dass Popkultur und die medialen Entwicklungen der letzten Jahrzehnte eng miteinander verknüpft sind, zeigt uns allein unser Wortgebrauch. Wir samplen, remixen und prosumieren was das Zeug hält. Und lassen das Urheberrecht dabei meistens links liegen. What is this? I’ve seen it on tumblr.

_

Sutherlands Gedicht diskutiert also auf einer Ebene hinter dem eigentlichen Text Fragen des Urheberrechts – müssen wir nicht unsere Quellen transparent machen? Den Urheber_innen Credit geben? Was ist eigentlich ein Original? – und verschärft diese Fragen in der Art, wie sie in den Text eingebracht werden. Indem er uns zeigt, wie wir uns mittlerweile durch Medien bewegen. Das ist ziemlich smart. Im Grunde funktionieren Gedichte schon immer so: Sie fordern uns auf, weiterzugehen. Ob das nun rein gedanklich oder per Klick stattfindet, das macht nur einen kleinen Unterschied.

_

Was allerdings einen gewaltigen Unterschied macht: Wenn ich mich als Leser irreführen lasse. Simone Kornappel, nicht Ross Sutherland hat die Links in den Text gesetzt, schrieb sie mir kurz nach Veröffentlichung dieses Kommentars. Damit hat sie den armen Sutherland zwar – in Barthes Metaphorik zumindest – gekillt, aber meine Argumentation nochmals bestätigt: Wir werden als Rezipient_innen von Medien immer aktiver und stellen damit auch den klassischen Begriff von Urheberschaft in Frage. Habe ich also nun einen Text von Ross Sutherland… oder aber Simone Kornappel interpretiert?

_

What is this? I’ve seen it on tumblr.

Von Kristoffer Cornils?

81137838

81137838

Nude III von Ross Sutherland

_

Kurze, dumme Frage: Was seht ihr auf diesem Bild? Lady Liberty, schon klar. Nächste dumme Frage: Was seht ihr dahinter? Die Golden Gate Bridge. Berechtigte, letzte Frage: Hä?

_

Dieses Bild wurde nicht gephotoshoppt, es wurde weder in New York noch in San Francisco aufgenommen, sondern in Odaiba, einer künstlichen Insel in der Bucht von Tokyo. Odaiba ist ein beliebtes Ausflugsziel – am Strand reihen sich Restaurants und Malls aneinander. Der Weg dorthin kann mit einer Monorail zurückgelegt werden, ein beeindruckendes Erlebnis. Die führerlose Bahn fährt durch fast menschenleere Gebiete, in denen riesige Gebäude zu sehen sind. In der Ferne ist sogar der Tokyo Tower zu erkennen, die Ketchup-und-Mayo-Variante des Eiffelturms.

_

pD112305630

_

Es ist bizarr, sich durch diese Kulisse zu bewegen, all diese »identical buildings« zu sehen und das Vertraute in der Fremde wiederzuerkennen. So wie »The School of Broken Necks in Toronto« und »The Yahtzee Institute in Bethlehem« gleich aussehen, so tun es die New Yorker und die Tokyoter Lady Liberty, die Golden Gate Bridge in Frisco und die Rainbow Bridge in der Bucht der japanischen Millionenstadt, der Pariser Eiffelturm und sein fernöstlicher, ein paar Meter größerer Kompagnon.

_

Die Architektur, die uns umgibt, wirkt sich unmittelbar auf unsere Weltwahrnehmung aus. Indem wir den Unterschied zwischen einem Spandauer Schrebergartenhäuschen, einer russischen Datscha und einem skandinavischen Wochenendhaus erkennen, identifizieren wir kulturelle Unterschiede. Und vielleicht kommt uns das Berliner Holzhäuschen ein bisschen einladender vor, weil es uns so vertraut ist.  Weil wir mit den Menschen darin eine Sprache und einen gemeinsamen kulturellen Background teilen.

_

Ich habe mich nie so fremd und fehl am Platz gefühlt wie in Japan. Ich spreche kaum Japanisch, erst recht aber fiel es mir schwer, mit der japanischen Mentalität zurechtzukommen. Zudem sah ich mit meinen 1,96 Meter Körpergröße, meiner obszön großen Nase und meinen straßenköterblonden Haaren zwischen all den etwas kleineren, in Haar und Teint dunkleren Asiat_innen aus wie ein riesiger, bunter Hund. Es fiel mir schwer, mich zurechtzufinden. Nicht nur geografisch, sondern auch kulturell. Dass ich immer wieder auf vermeintlich Vertrautes – ob nun die Lady Liberty, »Kartoffel Brot«, Goethe oder ganz finstere Gestalten der deutschen Geschichte – stieß, machte die gesamte Erfahrung noch surrealer. Es schien mir darüber fast unmöglich, mit irgendwelchen Menschen eine Verbindung aufzubauen. Komisch eigentlich. Denn haben wir nicht zumindest das Eine gemeinsam: Sind wir nicht alle Menschen?

_

Auch in den »identical buildings« von Ross Sutherlands Nude III leben Menschen. »[O]chre girlfriends«, die von Hockeyteams misshandelt werden. »Young minds«, die in Bibliotheken dahinsiechen. Und die_der »last member of an improv group«, die_der auf dem Nachhauseweg Iron Maiden hört. Iron Maiden habe ich in Japan auch gehört, sogar beim Karaoke dazu gesungen (es war viel, viel Schnaps im Spiel) und das letztlich sogar in einem Gedicht verarbeitet. In dem geht es vor allem darüber, wie wir andere Kulturen wahrnehmen. Mit welchen Vorurteilen, Missverständnissen wir uns dem Fremden nähern. Wie wir Vertrautes herbeiziehen, um uns das Unbekannte zu erklären. Wie falsch und anmaßend das sein kann.

_

Auch in Nude III – noch sowas: sehen wir nackt nicht alle gleich aus? – geht es um vermeintlich Vertrautes und die Menschen dahinter. Keine der genannten Personen aus den »identical buildings« ist uns wirklich unverständlich, egal wie ockerfarben sie sein mögen. »[A] closed burger van« sieht ja auch über auf der Welt gleich aus. Oder?

_

Vielleicht aber wäre es falsch, das anzunehmen. Vielleicht sollten wir vielmehr versuchen, das Besondere im Personal von Nude III auszumachen anstatt auf das Vertraute zu vertrauen. Vielleicht möchte uns das Gedicht ja sogar darauf hinweisen, dass wir – auch wenn wir alle dieselbe »hold music of the sky« hören und Tag für Tag durch ein instagrammiges »sepia of the streetlights« laufen, doch alle unterschiedlich sind. Egal, wo wir herkommen, welcher Kultur wir zugehören.

_

Banal? Vielleicht. Aber ist nicht so vieles, was uns banal scheint, im Kern richtig und wichtig?

Von Kristoffer Cornils

jcvd no prblm

 

Jean-Claude Van Damme von Ross Sutherland

 

Schon wieder Street Fighter, diesmal aber die Live-Action-Version. In der hat Jean-Claude van Damme mitgespielt. Ich habe den Film nie gesehen, dabei war ich doch eigentlich ein riesiger Fan von JCvD mit… So ungefähr sieben, acht Jahren. Mein Vater brachte mir ab und zu diese Zeitschrift mit, Limit hieß die und berichtete von coolen Typen, die das Limit regelmäßig überschritten. JCvD war einer davon, sein Haupttalent bestand darin, richtig geil schmerzhaft Spagat zu schlagen und dabei hart zu gucken. Ich erinnere mich noch an einer Poster aus der Limit, da trägt er so eine schwarz-weiß gestreifte Ballonhose und ein Unterhemd und guckt so markig, wie ich wohl gerne geguckt hätte; damals, als die Asis aus der Parallelklasse in den Schulhofschlägereien in der ersten und zweiten großen Parallelklasse mich in den Schwitzkasten nahmen. Tja. Bullshit, Wunschdenken.

 

Die Limit wurde irgendwann eingestellt, die Schulhofschlägereien ebenso und mittlerweile finde ich es relativ dumm, sich starke, männliche Identifikationsfiguren zu suchen, denen ich in Gedanken oder tatsächlich nacheifere. Erst recht nicht solche, die Muskeln aus Stahl haben oder geil Spagat schlagen können und dabei hart gucken. JCvD macht das aber immer noch und die Leute fressen die Scheiße noch, klicken es 75.000.000 mal an und nennen es epic. Warum eigentlich? Warum geht es uns dermaßen ab, wenn so ein abgehalfterter Karate-Nulli und Dritte-Wahl-Schauspieler einen geilen Spagat zwischen zwei Trucks schlägt? Wahrscheinlich, weil wir insgeheim immer noch so drauf sind wie ich mit sieben, acht Jahren und all diejenigen bewundern, die sich durchsetzen können, die körperliche und geistige Stärke aufbringen, irgendwas bis zum Schluss durchzuziehen. Ziemlich erbärmlich eigentlich. Nichts anderes, als wenn wir Steroid-Hengsten und Silikon-Stuten auf YouPorn beim Ficken zuzuschauen. Die haben was, die können was, was wir nicht haben und nicht können.

 

limit_oben

 

So wie der Vater, von dem in Jean-Claude van Damme die Rede ist. Der scheißt auf alles und erst recht scheißt er alles ein. Mit Atomsprengköpfen, seiner Entourage von thugs und seinem rotzig-tödlichen Verhalten gegenüber seinen Vorgesetzten. Nur ist Daddy eben kein JCvD und zieht sich tierisch die Leisten beim Versuch, dem nachzueifern. Weil er eben doch nur dasitzt und traurig vor sich hinsabbert, während der Fernseher läuft. Ist schon manchmal okay zu verlieren, versichert ihm der Sohn (es ist ganz bestimmt keine Tochter, mal wieder). Was lernen wir daraus? Fernsehen und Leben, das sind schon zwei verschiedene Sachen. Fantasie und Realität sind selten kongruent. Aha. Hm, na gut. Hatten wir schon, kennen wir. Ich habe ja auch weite Teile der ersten und zweiten großen Pause in diversen Schwitzkästen verbracht, obwohl ich ein JCvD-Poster in meinem Zimmer hängen hatte. Und das mit dem Spagat endete fast in Tränen. Glaubt mir, ich hab’s versucht. Es tat weh.

 

Obwohl es natürlich auch die andere Möglichkeit gibt, diesen Text zu lesen: Dass JCvD hier den Daddy gibt, den geschlagenen General. Als arme Muskelwurst. Als tapferer, tragischer Held. Ross Sutherland und ich, wir sind – obwohl ein paar Jahre zwischen uns liegen – ja vor allem mit dem Fernseher aufgewachsen, nehme ich an. Der hat uns die Welt gezeigt, uns erzogen, und uns wie diese Poster aus der Limit! damals Dinge gezeigt, denen wir gerne nacheifern wollten. Klar, dass wir mitleiden, wenn etwas auf dem Screen passiert. Klar, dass wir den armen JCvD trösten möchten, wenn das mit dem weltweiten Terrornetzwerk in die Hose geht. Wir hätten uns gefreut, wenn wir an seiner Macht hätten teilhaben können. Was wir ja getan hätten als Zuschauer, ganz sicher. So aber bleibt uns ein eigentlich irgendwie tröstlicher Gestus zum Schluss: Ein erhabenes better luck next time, »it’s OK to lose«. Die Altersweisheit der nachfolgenden Generation gegenüber der vorangegangenen. Dem heimlichen Triumph im stillen Fernsehkämmerlein, weitab von den Schwitzkästen dieser Welt. Auch eine Art, den Vater umzubringen.

Von Kristoffer Cornils

IMAG1855_1

IMAG1855_1

 

A Second Opinion von Ross Sutherland

Das Theater des 21. Jahrhunderts sieht so aus: Nackte Menschen stehen auf einer nackten Bühne und schreien sich an. So will es das Klischee, so ist manchmal die Realität. Nach spätestens zwei Aufführungen schockt das niemanden mehr, wirkt irgendwie ziemlich überflüssig. Gut machte es mal die Volksbühne, die einer Inszenierung von Père Ubu von Alfred Jarry das kurze Herzstück von Heiner Müller voranstellte. Da standen dann zwei nackte Kerle auf er Bühne. Die schrien nicht, sondern sprachen so ruhig wie besonnen miteinander und beim Satz »Es ist mir ein Vergnügen« griff die ZWEI der EINS ganz nüchtern an den Sack. Irre. Witzig. Irre witzig. Und ziemlich schlau eigentlich.

 

Das Ich aus Ross Sutherlands A Second Opinion lässt sich weder ans Herz noch in den Schritt grabschen, es bringt nur Röntgenbild mit, um seine (wortwörtlich:) innere Verfassung zu beweisen. »I told you what was in my heart«, aber das reicht eben nicht. Worte sind noch keine Beweise. Und die braucht es, warum auch immer. Es bleibt dem Ich also nichts anderes übrig, als armer Schluffi dazustehen, »tapping the acetate«. Dabei labert es weiter: Das hier, das ist eigentlich das. Und das, das ist das. Sein Gegenüber sieht wohl die hellen und dunklen Flecken, nicht aber den »a dead fox overlapping an empty wardrobe«. Es braucht eine zweite Meinung und selbst die liefert keine Ergebnisse.

 

Da hängt er nun, der arme Torso und ist so klug als wie zuvorso: Nämlich gar nicht. Das Röntgenbild zeigt nichts von dem, was das Ich im eigenen Brustkorb wähnt. Es müsste sich dazu schon ganz in Heiner-Müller-Manier das Herz herausschneiden lassen. Doof nur, dass das ein klitzekleines bisschen tödlich wäre. Da hat es die Volksbühne schon klüger angestellt, die Extremitäten baumeln ja frei herum und vielleicht findet sich sogar jemand, der sie lesen kann. Unsere Triebe sind halt leichter zu lesen als unsere Psyche. Das weiß ja auch der umtriebige Faus Goethes, der auch »nicht mehr in Worten kramen« möchte und bei dem sogar zwei Herzen in einer Brust pochern.

 

A Second Opinion ist eine einzige Krise. Die Worte versagen, das Bild allein ist noch kein Garant für Verständnis. Klar sieht »the September evening in my chest« milde aus für die Person, die diesen Septemberabend im Herzen trägt. Ob das Gegenüber jedoch dieselbe Wetterlage erkennt, das ist damit noch nicht gesagt. Zurück bleibt nur die Hoffnung darauf, dass alle Worte und Bilder dem anderen Menschen genug an die Hand gegeben haben, um zu verstehen. Das ist aber, sobald Sprache und Zeichen ins Spiel kommen, gar nicht mal so simpel. Wenn ihr versteht, was ich meine.

Von Kristoffer Cornils

zangief liu

 

Zangief von Ross Sutherland

 

Warum eigentlich Zangief und nicht Cammy? Weil die, wie so viele weibliche Game-Figuren, keine besonderen Kräfte, sondern nur riesige Titten vorzuweisen hat? Es gibt da diese große, wichtige und völlig berechtigte Diskussion, die gerade tobt: Videospiele sind sexistisch. Weil Frauen darin Inventar darstellen, keine Akteurinnen sind. Und wenn eine Frau wie Anita Sarkeesian das ausspricht, schlagen ihr Mord- und Vergewaltigungsfantasien entgegen. Nein, es gibt keine Gleichberechtigung in Videospielen, auch wenn die Zielgruppe bei 52% zu 48% stehen soll. Insbesondere da, wo gekloppt und gekillt wird, spielen boys mit boys, weil boys eben boys sind. »Wild boys, wild boys, wild boys.« Zangief ist eben so ein wild boy, muskulös, bärtig und höchstwahrscheinlich ungewaschen. Er würde sich auch im Berghain gut machen, ganz vorne links auf der Tanzfläche. Der Teil, der gerne als »Bärenecke« bezeichnet wird. »the Russian picks his partner from the trees«. Ein wild boys‘ dream, könnt ihr drauf wetten.

 

Zangief habe ich nie ausgewählt, als ich damals bei meinem Nintendo-Freund Michael Runde um Runde bei Street Fighter so richtig hart verprügelt wurde. Ich mochte die grazileren Figuren. Was damals – wie eben auch heute – bedeutete, dass ich die Frauen spielen musste. Die waren nur leider eben halb so stark wie die bauchigen Typen, mit denen sie es zu tun hatten. Noch so ein Grund, warum ich immer verloren habe. Zangief aber ist ein übermännliches Ungetüm, so ein richtiger Testosteroni. Ein (Arche-)Typ, wie er vor über 20 Jahren schon beliebt war und es immer noch ist. Wenig Hirn, viel Muskeln. Ein natural born winner.

 

zangief liu

Sutherland geht in seinem Text der Frage auf den Grund, warum unser Bodybuilder-Bärchen eigentlich so ein Untier ist, der laut Spiel-Booklet auch gerne mal seine Artgenossen, die sibirischen Bären, hopsnimmt. Boys beating bears. Es ist nämlich nicht wirklich überraschend, dass ausgerechnet die Darstellung eines Russen durch die Japaner (ich kann das »_innen« an dieser Stelle wohl stecken lassen) von Nintendo ziemlich stumpf ausfällt. Die beiden Nationen sind sich schon seit einiger Zeit nicht sonderlich grün und Japan hat, verkürzt gesagt, eh ein paar kleine Rassismusprobleme. Kurz: Zangief ist eben auch so ein Überuntermensch, weil er Russe ist. Was in dem Fall bedeutet, dass er ein Barbar ist. Im Text Zangief zeigt Sutherland das, sagen will er damit aber das Gegenteil.

 

So nimmt er sich nicht nur den Topos der übermännlichen Spielfigur vor, er spielt auch bewusst mit dem Motiv des Bärenkloppens: Der Bär muss kulturgeschichtlich gemeinhin als Allegorie für Russland herhalten. Der wild boy Zangief, selbst so ein pixeliges, martialisches Symbol für den grobschlächtigen Nachbarstaat, prügelt so gesehen seine eigene Herkunft, bis deren Schädel splittert. Das wäre übrigens aus japanischer Sicht der höchste aller Hochverrate. Sutherland denkt das Klischee vom überpotenten, manierenbefreiten Haudruff weiter, treibt es auf die Spitze. Und mit der stichelt er auf dem Rassismus des character designs herum. So weit, so gut. Aber dann?

 

Dann aber lässt er den Russen Russland, sich selbst, ausbluten. Nicht einfach so aus primitiver Grausamkeit heraus, sondern als eine Art Lektion. Russland soll solange bluten »until he sees those stars again«. Und wenn’s auch nur der eine ist, der über Hammer und Sichel prangt, oder was? Wirklich eindeutig wird der Text nicht, und doch: Zangief, das Gedicht und nicht der Typ, riecht nach Revolutionsaufruf. Das ist zwar sozialverträglicher als »stinking of shit« durch die Gegend zu müffeln, aber: Wer wie Sutherland als Europäer soweit geht, den anderen ihre Vorurteile vorzuhalten, sollte sich auch die eigenen vorhalten. Denn auch in seinen Videospiellandschaften tauchen Frauen nicht auf, vielmehr prügeln sich halt die Russen (eben auch nicht: _innen) gegenseitig die Scheiße aus dem Fell. Im Optimalfall für eine bessere, nicht weiter definierte Zukunft.

 

Ich weiß nicht, wann Sutherland Zangief geschrieben hat. Aber gerade im Jahr 2014, wo die westliche Gesellschaft und insbesondere deren Presse anlässlich der brenzligen Situation in der Ukraine mit negativen wie positiven Vorurteilen um sich schmeißt, wirkt es auf mich umso brisanter. Noch ein bisschen spitzer, noch ein bisschen stumpfer. Weil es, indem es die Vorurteile vorführt, sie auch bestätigt. Unter anderem das vom muskulösen, russischen Gewinner, der sich die Bären zu Untertanen macht.

 

tumblr_mhxc4mc8RF1qzpsuoo1_1280

 

Von Kristoffer Cornils

IMAG1851

(c) Kristoffer Cornils

Infinite Lives (Try, try, try again) von Ross Sutherland

 

Ich habe nie eine Spielkonsole besessen und trotzdem immer Videospiele gespielt. Auch wenn Muddan auf pädagogisch wertvollen Krimskrams – Brettspiele und, echt jetzt: Holzspielzeuge und das alles – bestand und mir in meiner Teenager-Zeit schlicht das Geld fehlte, habe ich seit der Grundschule an ziemlich viel mitnehmen können. Denn ich hatte Nintendo-Freunde. Michael und später dann Jan, irgendwann kam Helge. Mit denen traf ich mich bei ihnen und wir zockten den ganzen Nachmittag und, wenn Wochenende war, auch mal die Nacht durch. Guter Deal für beide Seiten: Ich konnte daddeln, solange ich wollte und sie hatten einen Sparring-Partner, der ihnen das gute Gefühl gab, unschlagbar zu sein. Ich habe nämlich nur in den seltensten Fällen gewinnen können.

 

Ich mochte wohl fiktive Welten schon immer lieber als die, in der ich angeblich leben sollte. Schon als ich noch gar nicht lesen konnte, war ich regelmäßig in der Stadtbücherei, Comics gucken. Als Muddan sich irgendwann weigerte, meinem fünf Jahre alten Ich einen ganz besonders pädagogisch wertlosen Comic vorzulesen, habe ich mir das Lesen dann einfach selbst gebracht. Vielleicht war das aber nur ein besonders smarter, pädagogisch wertvoller Trick von Muddan, dem ich da aufgesessen bin. Ich las alles, was mir zwischen die Finger kam. Kinderfreundliche Literatur, nicht ganz so kinderfreundliche Sagengeschichte und später dann Krimis und Thriller, die alles andere als kinderfreundlich waren. Nebenbei entdeckte ich außerdem das Fernsehen, das heißt: Ich durfte endlich mal gucken. Und verlor mich mit der gleichen Intensität, mit der ich auch durch die Zeilen jagte, in Cartoons, Spielfilmen und Action-Serien.

 

Vielleicht habe ich also nach und nach einen problematischen Realitätsbezug entwickelt. Das zumindest war immer Muddans Sorge, deswegen hat sie mich ab und an aus dem Haus geschmissen, damit ich mich mal wieder mit dem echten Leben umgebe, statt heimlich im Bett zu lesen, mich verstohlen ins Fernsehzimmer zu schleichen oder bei meinen Nintendo-Freunden abzuhängen. Vielleicht aber habe ich dabei einfach nur eine besondere Wahrnehmung entwickelt. »I have helmed enough spaceships in my time / to understand a lounge in three dimensions.« Videospiele haben nicht meine Fantasie gekillt, sie haben sie erweitert. Ich konnte sie im echten, also richtig echten Leben anwenden, so wie Sutherlands Text das vormacht. Noch bevor der Begriff augmented reality aufgetaucht war, hatte ich das schon als Praxis verinnerlicht.

 

Was nicht allein positiv ist, klar. Irgendwo lauert immer »some great crash yet to come«, vielleicht wird er sogar herbeigesehnt. Um mal auszuprobieren, ob es wirklich Infinite Lives, unendlich Leben, in diesem einen gibt. Kurz speichern, was riskieren, dabei draufgehen, resetten und entspannt von vorn anfangen. Easy, oder? »I used to watch // those bartenders and think that they were fakers.« Als würden die anderen nicht auch in ihren filter bubbles leben, sich ihre eigene Welt zurechtzimmern. Wenn wir uns alle unsere Realitäten selbst schaffen, und sei es nur die Realität vom besonders realen Leben, das nun mal ist wie es ist – warum das nicht auf die Spitze treiben?

 

Wegen der »out-takes« vielleicht. Dem, was kein Film zeigt, was in keinem Buch steht und was in jedem Videospiel nur überflüssiger Ballast wäre. Wenn nach dem Risiko was draufgeht. Und es keinen letzten Speicherpunkt gibt, von dem es sich respawnen ließe. Das habe ich wie nebenbei nämlich auch gelernt: Dass ich ab und zu eben auf die Fresse fliege oder kriege, wenn ich zu weit gehe. »OK I finally get it«, das wäre mir nie über die Lippen gekommen. Zumindest nicht das »finally«. Weshalb ich diesen Text etwas banal, um nicht zu sagen moralinsauer finde. Muddan hätte ihn vielleicht gut gefunden, damals. Nach dem Motto: Du wirst schon rausfinden, dass das nicht das echte Leben ist. Als würde das mit der Trennung zwischen virtuell und echt so einfach hinhauen. Was ich eben nicht denke. Ja, I got it, sowas von. Trotzdem, nein halt, gerade deshalb: Lebe ich lieber in allen möglichen Realitäten zugleich, als zu kapitulieren und mich in die eine zurückzuverkriechen. Als Belohnung winken Infinite Lives.

Von Kristoffer Cornils

IMAG1736_1

Foto: (c) Kristoffer Cornils

Konventionelle Kindheit und Jugend in Buxtehude, nach dem Abitur dann standesgemäßer Umzug nach Berlin für ein ehrgeizig verfolgtes Studium der Literaturwissenschaften, auf das ein halbherzig verfolgtes Studium der Kulturwissenschaften folgte. Das ist noch nicht ausgestanden.Regelmäßig in Print- und E-Magazinen wie spex, Groove, HHV.de Mag, VICE und Fixpoetry zu lesen. Schwerpunkte: Musik und Literatur. Mitbegründer der Lesereihe Kreuzwort, nach etwas mehr als drei Jahren aber gleichermaßen erleichtert wie rührselig ausgestiegen. Diverse Moderationsjobs hier und dort sowie Konzeption, Organisation und Moderation des Literaturfestivals außerbetrieb im Herbst 2011.

 

Links:

Blog von Kristoffer Cornils
Kristoffer Cornils bei Twitter
Kristoffer Cornils bei facebook

IMAG1736_1

Foto: (c) Kristoffer Cornils

Profi-Leser

Konventionelle Kindheit und Jugend in Buxtehude, nach dem Abitur dann standesgemäßer Umzug nach Berlin für ein ehrgeizig verfolgtes Studium der Literaturwissenschaften, auf das ein halbherzig verfolgtes Studium der Kulturwissenschaften folgte. Das ist noch nicht ausgestanden.Regelmäßig in Print- und E-Magazinen wie spex, Groove, HHV.de Mag, VICE und Fixpoetry zu lesen. Schwerpunkte: Musik und Literatur. Mitbegründer der Lesereihe Kreuzwort, nach etwas mehr als drei Jahren aber gleichermaßen erleichtert wie rührselig ausgestiegen. Diverse Moderationsjobs hier und dort sowie Konzeption, Organisation und Moderation des Literaturfestivals außerbetrieb im Herbst 2011.

 

Links:

Blog von Kristoffer Cornils
Kristoffer Cornils bei Twitter
Kristoffer Cornils bei facebook
 

 

 

Dienstag, 18. November 2014, 19:00 Uhr, Eintritt frei
¿Comment! – Lesung & Installation mit Ross Sutherland und Konstantin Ames, Catherine Hales und Simone Kornappel

 

Gedichte des schottischen Lyrikers und Kommentare seiner Leser, darunter Stefan Mesch, Kristoffer Cornils, Konstantin Ames sowie von Schülern der John F. Kennedy School, des Hildegard-Wegschneider Gymnasiums und des Paulsen Gymnasiums

Zweisprachige Lesung (deutsch/englisch)
Die Lettétage dankt allen Förderern und Partnern!

 

Lettrétage, Mehringdamm 61, Nähe U7/U6 Mehringdamm

 

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

foto ross sutherland_(c) James Lyndsay

 

Ross Sutherland wurde 1979 in Edinburgh geboren und arbeitet als Autor und Performer, Filmemacher und Dozent in Creative Writing. Er kombiniert live seine literarischen Texte mit Stand-Up-Elementen und Visuellem.

Sutherland veröffentlichte vier Gedichtbände, alle beim Londoner Independent Verlag Penned in the Margins:
„Things To Do Before You Leave Town“ (2009), „Twelve Nudes“ (2010), „Hyakuretsu Kyaku“ (2011) und „Emergency Window“ (2012).

 

Website von Ross Sutherland

     

     

     
foto_kornappel-(c) Ken Yamamoto

Kuratorin Simone Kornappel, 1978 in Bonn geboren, ist Mitherausgeberin der „Randnummer Literaturhefte“. Ihr Debütband „raumanzug“ ist derzeit in Arbeit und erscheint demnächst bei Luxbooks, Wiesbaden.

Kuratorisches Statement:

Jemand berichtet, ist aufmerksam. Ein Ich, das die anfallenden Unfallstellen genau untersucht, kommentiert. Dazu ein Hin und Her hinter den Kulissen. Absagen an. Einladungen zu. „preparation(s) for some crash yet to come”.

 

 

Zur Performance
hall of [variation von sachverhalt und falschen pfründen, vom bäumen der allee, e e e, durchgängig
zitierbar] wem?

 

In ihrer Inszenierung hebt Simone Kornappel darauf ab, die Verschränkung von literarischem Text (Schreiben) und Leserkommentaren (Lesen) widerzuspiegeln sowie die Mechanismen der digitalen in die analoge Welt zu übertragen. Die Texte werden wie Räume durchschritten, der Raum wie ein Text gelesen. Kornappel arbeitet daher in der Lettrétage mit verschiedenen Medien und Raumelementen wie einer live durchgeführten Twitter-Session, Audioaufnahmen von beteiligten Schülern und mit Kommentaren bedruckten Post-it‘s und Papierknäueln.

 

Gedichte von Ross Sutherland (e/dt)

Kommentare zu den Gedichten Ross Sutherlands

 

von Katharina Deloglu

 

Video zum Gedicht My shoes are in love

100 Fragen an die Lyrik, Stefan Mesch

In September of 2014, Literaturhaus Lettrétage invited me to write about 7 poems of British author Ross Sutherland for “comment – lesenistschreiben”, a Berlin-based project that encouraged students and whole school courses to react to contemporary writers.

.

Once I was done with my initial 7 statements, Literaturhaus Lettrétage solicited another, final text:

.

Over three weeks in September and October, my assignment grew into this essay.

.

It is written for (German) high school students and it has some links to Ross Sutherland and the “comment” project.

.

Still: You don’t need to know anything about Ross or the project to enjoy my text. I worked with similar lists in the past (link 1, link 2, link 3), and if you want to syndicate this text and / or publish a German translation of it – please get in touch: smesch@gmx.net   

.

.


“Dogs are so tricky!” Does poetry matter?

.

Stefan Mesch

.
01_I don’t know any people who read poetry… that aren’t poets themselves.

.

02_Have you ever spent money on a poetry collection?

.

03_Did you ever copy, photograph or forward a poem? They’re easy to pirate / collect / archive / spread around. Why aren’t we doing that – all the time?

.

04_Why aren’t there poems in Happy Meals? On street corners? In every issue of Der Spiegel? Poetry doesn’t take much space: Why isn’t it more present in public life?

.

05_What’s the use of studying poems in school?

.

06_What’s the use of learning poems by heart?

.

07_Would you rather read 10 poems by 10 people… or 10 poems by one poet? What’s the difference between reading the first poem by Ross Sutherland and the 7th? Does reading the 7th make you want to read another 7? Or buy one of his poetry collections?

.

08_Would you rather meet someone who wrote poems – or someone who read them? Would you rather be known as a poet… or as a reader of poems?

.

09_Where can you go to find new poetry? Where can you get specific, personal recommendations? What prizes, festivals, literary magazines, experts, curators, critics, websites and poetry publishers do you know… and trust / like?

.

10_Why isn’t there a Netflix- or last.fm-like poetry recommendation streaming service that helps you curate a personal poetry stream?

.

11_Why isn’t there a social cataloging site that lets you rate poems? And if there was: What would end up as their best-rated, most popular one? Plucky, affirmative, hopeful poems like Hermann Hesse’s „Stufen“? Christian / religious wisdom? Love poems? Limericks and comedy? Nostalgic rhymes for children?

.

12_Imagine you wanted to learn about Japan. Or Poland. Would you learn more by reading 100 Japanese (or Polish) poems – or 100 pages of a novel? By looking at 100 adverts? Or 30 music videos? 100 pieces of photojournalism? What different things could you learn from each format?

.

13_The more you know about a culture and a language, the better you’ll be able to understand the nuances of their poems. That being said: Would you rather read poems written by your cousin – or by someone with a completely different home, culture, background?

.

14_If you had never heard of Ross Sutherland: Would you have noticed that these poems were written by a man? A young person? A Brit? A white person?

.

15_As a German: When you read Ross Sutherland, are you reading “a poem” or “something British”? What stands out: Ross’ British-ness or Ross’ poems-as-poetry?

.

16_Name three famous poets… who are still alive.

.

17_Name one famous poet still alive… who is famous for his or her poetry: no novelists or playwrights or Bob Dylans who publish poetry on the side!

.

18_Close your eyes. Imagine a male poet. Imagine a female poet. Who is younger? Funnier? Sexier? Smarter? More widely-read? Angrier? Dorkier? More confident? More serious? More respected?

.

19_If poems are nowhere in our culture – why bother with them in the curriculum? Shouldn’t we study video games, instead?

.

20_Are poems “nowhere in our culture”? If not: Where ARE they, actually?

.

21_My poet friends seem angrier, more political and disenfranchised than my novelist friends. Maybe because they are used to getting the short end of the stick? Less recognition? Less money? Less respect?

.

22_Why are novels more popular than poems, and why are the media more eager to praise and feature novelists? Has it always been that way, historically? Is there a way this could change?

.

23_Are movies “more inviting” than novels? Are novels “easier” than poems? Why is poetry considered such a “difficult” and “problematic” format?

.

24_Are “difficult” and “problematic” the same thing?

.

25_Imagine a poetry reading at Literaturhaus Lettrétage: What would need to happen for you to buy a ticket? (Bilingual would be good. Verses on a projector would be good. Some sort of discussion and Q&A would be great! Also: guests with different positions and backgrounds. Diversity!)

.

26_Poet Sabine Scho asks: Why do people enjoy dissing poetry?

.

27_I’d counter: Why does poetry leave nearly everyone cold?

.

28_It’s time-consuming to pick a favorite movie director, because sampling even one director’s work will take you 90+ minutes. It’s easy to buy a collection like „Lyrik von jetzt“ and start finding favorites. What are you waiting for?

.

29_Are poems less present because they are hard to market and commodify? 10 years ago, “personal” cell phone ring tones were a gold mine. Could something similar happen to poems? A digital poetry gift service? A WhatsApp subscription store? Are poems on the fringe because no one has found a way to make quick money from them yet?

.

30_But then: Hardly anyone makes money from webcomics, either. And THEY have a huge online presence and millions of passionate fans.

.

31_This webcomic audience is pretty young, though: many tweens, teenagers and college students. Do poets reach these audiences? Is poetry TRYING to reach these audiences? Are there poems on Instagram? Poets on Vine? Are there tumblr-famous Young Adult poets I’ve never heard of?

.

32_Sabine Scho loves that, because poetry is little-read, she can get crap past the radar: “There is no place you can go wilder, get ruder than in a poem. Their punk potential is enormous! To me, that is enough.” How can poets “go wild”? How would you “go wild” in a poem?

.

33_Traditionally, poetry has often been a way to voice dissent and be political. Would poems be more popular if states forbid and outlawed them?

.

34_If you had an urgent live-or-die message that had to reach many readers, would you sit down and write a poem? I can see how poetry is essential in regimes where no one can talk openly. But today? Here and now? Can’t we all be blunt? Write down what we really mean?

.

35_Where’s the fun in NOT being blunt?

.

36_How can poetry disrupt / object / challenge?

.

37_Are there people who pirate poems? Should poems be free? Are there copyright fights over poetry? I know that there are fierce legal battles over every word Karl Valentin ever published: His heirs and copyright holders sued many, many people. If you help spread Karl Valentin’s work, chances are good that you will be sued. (Rightly so?)

.

38_Are poems elitist? Are poems too complicated? Are poems like posh, sneaky parties in a room that takes 10 keys (and 20 years of education) to unlock? Does poetry get dissed because it’s not inclusive enough? IS poetry inclusive enough?

.

39_German readers can compare Ross Sutherland’s original poems to their German “Nachdichtungen”. Personally, I felt that the original poems sounded harsher, more abrupt or less sentimental than their German “Nachdichtungen”. Why? Because to Germans, English often sounds like the “edgier”, less sentimental language?

.

40_How does translation change a poem’s tone and atmosphere? As a poet, would you be okay with these tonal changes to your texts? As a reader, do you prefer all original versions to their German “Nachdichtung”?

.

41_Would you rather be talented enough to write excellent poems… or have the talent to understand other people’s poetry?

.

42_Imagine a magician that sells talent: What should be his price range for a „If I write poems, they will turn out great“ talent? Which other talents would be near that range? What would you sacrifice or invest to create great poetry yourself?

.

43_Few people have the money and the resources to finish a movie. Few people have the time and energy to finish a novel. A lot of people can try and write some poems: Why do most of them stop in their 20s?

.

44_A publisher friend once lamented that if all people who had written poems as teenagers would be buying new poems today, poetry would be mainstream. Do people love writing poems more than they love reading them?

.

45_How would you pick your own poem’s images and topics? Would you research? How? What do you think has been the kernel of most poetry: an idea? A feeling? An impulse? I feel like Ross Sutherland wants to amuse and surprise / astonish.

.

46_Do you think classic poems, the ones you read in school, were „more universal“, „aged better“?

.

47_On Amazon and rating sites like Goodreads, poetry collections get very high scores: People give more stars to nonfiction, experimental books, “difficult formats” than to novels. But if these “difficult formats” are so much fun – why is hardly anyone reading them? Is there prestige in posting high ratings for “difficult” books? Do you feel rewarded when you read “difficult” poems? If you told everyone in your life that you loved poetry: Who would react? How?

.

48_Imagine you could be known by every school kid for the next 100 years for one poem that will be taught everywhere: What would your poem be about?

.

49_What’s the best age to read Ross Sutherland’s poems? Does it help to be male? Does it help to be British? Does it help to be born in 1979, be white, know video games etc.? Do his poems have a target audience?

.

50_”Why is poetry seen as a problem child? You won’t get rich from dogwalking either – and still, no one says: ‘Dogs are so tricky! There’s something wrong with dogs.’” (Sabine Scho)

.

51_How can we be sure that Ross is a true, “professional” poet? What sets him apart from a hobby poet? Is that a valid distinction – is it important?

.

52_In an interview, Ross recommends the “big poetry clubs” of Great Britain. “Nights such as Book Slam, OneTaste and Homework in London, Hammer and Tongue in Brighton, Big Word in Edinburgh.” Do places like that exist in Germany? Where can you go to discover young poets? Is there a difference between “poet” and “poetry slam contestant”?

.

53_There is a lot of humor in Ross’ poems. I love that – because if you pay for comedy, you want to laugh. Throughout a comedic performance, you might ask: “Is this funny enough? Am I getting what I came for?”. Ross can afford to be more elegant, relaxed – because his humor comes as an extra, an unexpected bonus: It’s not the “main attraction”. Are Ross’ texts funny because it’s not their main goal to be funny?

.

54_What is their main goal? Do they achieve it?

.

55_Is this a question that should be asked? Can it be answered by readers?

.

56_I wish that lots of poetry had links and footnotes – like the ones Simone Kornappel used to complicate and remix Ross’ “Richard Branson” poem.

.

57_Poets might reply: “But poetry has links already! The title ‘Richard Branson’ makes you think of Richard Branson! Katharina Schultens’ ‘gorgos portofolio’ poems recall the gorgons of Greek myth. There are huge semi-hidden references in nearly every poem: Try to uncover these connections yourself! You want ‘hyperlink literature’? Poems are hyper-hyperlinked!”

.

58_My reservation here is that I can easily recognize a reference like “Zangief” because I grew up playing “Street Fighter II”. I have huge problems with a reference like “Hyperion” because I’m not a scholar of ancient Greece – or an upper-class school boy at a humanistic private school in Vienna, ca. 1880. What is the difference between poems named “Menelaus” and “Lindsay Lohan”? Can I love one – but feel bored and excluded by the other?

.

59_If Katharina Schultens wrote a “Gorgos Portfolio” NOVEL, I’d buy it. Because novels taught and reassured me that most background facts I’ll need to know in order to enjoy them are right there on the pages – like toys that come with batteries included. Poems often seem like reactions, comments, references and replies: meta-narration, second-degree writing, texts that needs other text, frustrating on its own. Beiträge zweiter Ordnung.

.

60_When I started reading Ross Sutherland’s poetry, I didn’t know about his goals or personal history, his self-image or the standards to which he holds his work. In my analysis, I approached his poems as carefully constructed, deliberately literary texts; delicate strings of words where every nuance matters. How else could poetry be approached? Are we more careful and nervous around poems? Are we too careful? Frightened?

.

61_I’m much less respectful with (…or intimidated by) songs: Once I hear music, I feel confident enough to say „These are smart lyrics. These are trite lyrics!“ To me, this comes easier because music brings so many extra layers of information – especially online: the instruments, the album artwork, musicians and their stage personae, the videos and live performances. I feel competent around songs. They are easy to scrutinize. Poems, on the other hand, often seem distant, hermetic, guarded, solipsistic or opaque. They make me turn away and shrug: “Why bother? Who am I to criticize?”

.

62_Do you want to know what Ross looks like? If he sleeps with men or with women? If he wins awards? Had a happy childhood? If he’s a not-very-rich poet – or a starving one? Does all this help you understand (and appreciate) his work?

.

63_Do you want to know Ross’ intentions? Each poem’s backstory and making-of? His insecurities, personal verdicts and the walkthroughs, user’s guides, interpretations and cheat codes he has been handing out to explain his work?

.

64_Should poems “work on their own” – or is that kind of extra information half the fun? Do you wish each poem came with a text about the author’s intentions? Or does that show that Ross’ poems are too meek to stand for themselves?

.

65_Why should poetry “stand for itself”? A lot of poets are excellent at writing about their work: Much better than most novelists (…or singers). I love reading poetry-related essays, analysis and discourse in places like Lyrikkritik.de or BELLA triste. In fact, I love these poetry essays much more than I love most poetry!

.

66_Compared to journalists and novelists, poets often seem more social, open, more professional and eager-to-network: They are doing performances and discussions, translations and curating work, they write essays and give workshops. Is it because they HAVE to – in order to make a living? Because a community as small as the poetry scene needs strong bonds and a carefully maintained system of give-and-take? Or is their work as poets giving them skills to branch out, connect, experiment, adapt?

.

67_Name five things you value in a poem. Here are mine:

1. ambivalence

2. ambition

3. emotion

4. curiosity

5. imagery that, for a while, won’t leave my head

.

68_Is it okay if they aren’t there? Some of them? All of them?

.

69_Can a poem be too short? Too long? Are two words a poem? One? To me, Ross’ “Experiment to determine the Existence of Love” felt too long – but more because it wasn’t strong / complex enough to hold my interest through all these stanzas.

.

70_Is there something a poem shouldn’t be? Didactic? Ignorant? Racist? Branded / commercial? Boring?

.

71_I can imagine a dangerous book, a dangerous movie. But I have trouble picturing a dangerous poem – besides ones that reproduce or make light of intolerance: propaganda, hateful or cruel slogans.

.

72_That being said: I feel like Ross’ poems are extremely harmless.

.

73_Music has rhythms. Paintings have color schemes. But modern poetry mostly did away with rhymes. Are rhymes too banal? Playful? Were they essential to poetry before? Until when? What is essential to today’s poetry?

.

74_What makes a text qualify as a poem?

.

75_Poetry collections are rather thin. Poems are rather short. Neither have to be: There are reasons that most feature films are long enough to warrant a trip to the cinema. That most paintings are smaller than a garage. That most albums take less than 80 minutes to play. But is there a reason that most poems fit on one or two pages?

.

76_I’d love to see poems use pictures, not words. But I guess that would be too… expensive? Hard to stage? Anyone all over the world can write „a sad, pale pink shirt on a frozen riverbank“. But it would take lots of resources to find the ideal shirt – and place it on the ideal riverbank. Still: If there are graphic novels – why aren’t there graphic poems? Sequential images, structured and layered like written poetry?

.

77_Because no matter how clear and simple a poet’s words – it’s hard to make people see the “correct” pale pink shirt: Is it frustrating to describe a shirt and have your readers picture 1000 different ones?

.

78_I lost a lot of faith in Ross-the-Poet when I saw his poetry films on Youtube: They seemed much simpler, flatter, easy to dismiss – like student projects finished in a rush because everyone involved wanted to go and play air hockey instead. Our standards are rising: It’s often excruciating to manage Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, to blog and be camera-ready and professional if you’re a single artist / freelancer. Still: Ross’ videos looked so haphazard and careless that I wondered how much care this same person invested in their poetry. (Is this a fair question, though? How many poets should we judge by their Youtube accounts?)

.

79_”The poems are the bricks, the performance is the mortar”, Ross writes about his career on stage: “Poetry comes alive for me in those situations. To see my poems dead on the page… they look a little lost.” Do you agree? How “dead” and “lost” are Ross’ poems?

.

80_What are we missing if we discuss Ross’ work as nothing but text? Imagine that someone stole Madonna’s song lyrics and posted them online, without any context or musical cues: If we talk about these words but stay ignorant about their performer, the stage, their delivery… how much can we really understand?

.

81_And what if I’m wrong: What if Ross Sutherland’s biggest goal IS the laughter? The applause? What if he writes poetry to make college-aged crowds in bars cheer and laugh? Would that still be “poetry”? Why wouldn’t it?

.

82_I expect poets to place each word with care (…but then: maybe I’m too conventional: it must be okay for poets to be rash, silly and careless, too!). Still – I love texts, essays, novels, translations, tweets by poets because they pick better, more thought- and colorful words than anyone else – and I wonder if this is becoming more important for many non-poets, too: How? Where? What can poets teach us?

.

83_All German children spend 9+ years in school. They have more than 9,000 hours of classes. How many of these classes should be about poetry? Poetry writing? Poetry history? Poetry analysis?

.

84_I don’t remember if, in 13 years of Deutschunterricht, we ever saw a poem by a non-German author. Even today, I could not name 5 to 10 French, Spanish or Italian poets. We had no Milton in school. No Dante. Plath, cummings, Dickinson and Blake only showed up in my A-Level English class / Englisch-LK.

.

85_Because poets know so well how to craft colorful, intelligent, suprising and precise sentences… what kind of jobs or university courses could profit from a poetry-writing class or workshop? Who could learn? And what? Teachers? Copywriters? Journalists? Anyone talking or writing?

.

86_Once I google „Why is poetry important“, I get these points and ideas:

language awareness

critical analysis

creativity and enthusiasm

and, in ALL German results: “to talk about the feelings that you can’t express otherwise”

.

87_You meet an interesting person. Now… you might want to take a portrait. Do an interview. Write a novel! Once you hear a song, you might want to sing your own version. I understand how people say: “I saw something. It challenged me – and made me want to create a play, a movie, a game, an essay, an intervention.” But what needs to happen to make a poet say: „Oh! I want to take this stimulus… and describe it in ambivalent language in an ambivalent way“…? Poems seems like a more indirect, long-winded, complicated way to react to the world than most other artistic responses.

.

88_Because despite all well-picked words, poetry often seeks ambivalence: Words can mean two or three exclusive things. There can be friction and frightening gaps. Where else is that kind of paradox, unclear language possible – and encouraged?

.

89_If there’s not one single correct interpretation to a poem… why bother interpreting at all? If anything can mean two or three different things… why go play detective? With most poems, we will never find out the murderer’s motif. Or the poet’s “intention”…

.

90_Fantasy literature is much more popular in rural areas: The German publisher of “Lord of the Rings” said that most of their fan mail came from remote German villages. If fantasy is a “country thing” – is science fiction a “city thing”? What about poetry: Are the classic poems (Nature! Romance! Weather!) more popular with rural people? Is modern poetry a “city thing” – colder, fractured and dense?

.

91_15 years ago, when German journalist Else Buschheuer started writing about her love for “Sex and the City”, a lot of horrible women approached her and cheered “Yes! I love that show, too! We have so much in common”. Buschheuer says that she has never felt “in worse company” than after she championed “Sex and the City”. Do you know someone who loves poetry? What are they like? Would you enjoy their company? Become “one of them”?

.

92_Do you think Ross Sutherland loves poetry? I studied Creative Writing – but many students around me didn’t love books and read very little. What they loved was being a writer. The heroism. The rebellion. The scrappy underdog allure.

.

93_I really don’t know anyone who LOVES poems the way many of my friends LOVE novels: Only publishers of poetry… who say that poetry is important. And many poets writing about their poetry friends. But everyone has skin in the game – and everyone seems more passionate about the “importance of poetry” than they are about actual, living poets: “poetry” is beloved. Actual, living poets, though? They are treated like rare birds. Or whales. You want them to survive. But you don’t want them to stay on your couch.

.

94_As a reader and literature critic, I often roll my eyes when I discuss publishing: like many readers and critics, I think that there are too many bad or overhyped books – while the good ones are hard to find. On pages like Lyrikzeitung.com, most poets sound equally exhausted about poetry – but while I feel that there is too much [overhyped fiction], most poets feel overlooked. Stefan: „Don’t we spend too much time talking about books that might not be worth that attention?” Poets: „Poetry needs more attention! Now!” I feel like most poets love „all of poetry“ while I definitely don’t love „all of literature“. My aim is selection. Their aim is… promotion? Protection? Survival?

[In German, “Selektion” is a phrase that has strong Nazi implications. If you’re a critic, please don’t talk about “Selektion”.]

.

95_How would this discussion, the whole perception of poetry, change if poems became popular again? If there was money for poets and publishers and more people interested in reading and listening to poetry? Would the poems change? Would the discussions change? Would happiness increase?

.

96_How can you support poetry? How can you help make poems more visible?

.

97_Many authors write down new and little-used words. What would happen if you kept a file and updated it for a full year? How would it change you? Would it be worth your time?

.

98_Why would Ross partake in the “comment”-project? Would you enjoy reading hundreds of comments, responses, critiques and conflicting ideas about your work?

.

99_I can imagine Ross saying „Wow. There were three German scholar guys [Kristoffer Cornils, Konstantin Ames and me: the Profileser] who immediately started googling shit like ‘School of Broken Necks’ like THAT was the most important aspect of my poetry.” I think that Ross would enjoy a more relaxed, less scholarly approach to his work. Any ideas?

.

100_Are poems inspiring? Movies and TV shows make me empathize with difficult characters. Video games inspire me to work hard – or explore. Novels inspire me to shape a story, connect the dots and focus on bigger pictures. Poems, if anything, inspire me to reflect the way I have been using words.

Because every one of these little fuckers… matters. So much.

Hi this is Ross Sutherland, providing some extra notes on my poem “A Second Opinion”.

I think this is one of the most straight-forward poems I submitted! It’s a pretty heavy-handed metaphor, but at the same time, the poem is a pretty useful key to understanding my other poems.

In it, you get the story of a couple going through the ‘biopsy’ of a relationship. The author shows his girlfriend an x-ray of his heart, then begins to wax lyrical about the diagnosis.  The x-ray is full of dark patches, signifying the ‘sickness’ of the relationship, but the author tries to transform each one into an elaborate, pointless metaphor.  Metaphor used as a band-aid on reality.

A lot of my work is about the limitations of language. I’m interested in the places where words break down. Almost all my poems have a moment where the poem breaks down or calls attention to itself – I think I’ve handled the subject with more skill as I’ve got older, but I like this poem because it’s a very simple articulation of that idea.

I can almost hear people shouting “so what? Boring postmodernism 101. Tell us something we don’t know!”

I wrote this poem in the middle of the worst break-up I ever had. For me, it’s not just a piece of literary grist, but a very personal poem as well. In the final couple of lines, I’m trying to grapple with the end of the relationship. Perhaps if this poem wasn’t so personal, I could abandon it. But my life is tied to this poem, whether I like it or not. I’m still learning this lesson- that you can’t use poetry to win the hearts of others. You can only use it to change yourself.

If the x-ray is supposed to symbolise my relationship, what about the light that passes through it? I’ve not really thought about it before. The ‘september light’ coming through the window is the symbol of the outer world. It’s the world I can’t control. At the end of the poem, my soon-to-be ex-girlfriend will exit the house, walk into that white light and vanish. But this same white light is what ‘powers’ the x-ray. The dark parts of the x-ray are the poems I write, the white parts are the space around them. Poems are defined by the space around them. Like the empty gap on the page beneath a poem. But also – the space inside poems. The things you can’t say or can’t control. The space between words. These are the things that shape a poem, just as much as the dark masses of text we produce.

 

I really liked the Heiner Muller poem, posted by Kristoffer Cornils in response. A lovely poem on a similar subject.  Here’s another favourite of mine: “The Six Times My Heart Broke” by Luke Kennard.

I’m here online to absorb all your misgivings. So whether you loved it / hated it / felt no human emotion whatsoever, let me know through the comment section below.

1 2